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'[EE] UK electric plugs'
2010\01\29@152126 by Sean Breheny

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Hi all,

Can someone familiar with UK electrical wiring please tell me what
type of sockets would usually be found in an industrial (warehouse)
setting for use in powering small equipment (computers, printers,
personal fans, etc.)? Is it the BS1363-type or the IEC60309 or
something else? Our plan is that the equipment will be plugged into a
power strip and then that strip connected to the building electrical
supply via one plug (either BS1363 or IEC60309). Is this
typical/legal? If not, what is usually done?

Thanks,

Sean

2010\01\29@154240 by Mike Harrison

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face
On Fri, 29 Jan 2010 15:20:45 -0500, you wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>Can someone familiar with UK electrical wiring please tell me what
>type of sockets would usually be found in an industrial (warehouse)
>setting for use in powering small equipment (computers, printers,
>personal fans, etc.)? Is it the BS1363-type or the IEC60309 or
>something else? Our plan is that the equipment will be plugged into a
>power strip and then that strip connected to the building electrical
>supply via one plug (either BS1363 or IEC60309). Is this
>typical/legal? If not, what is usually done?
>
>Thanks,
>
>Sean

You will always have the normal 13 amp BS1363 sockets, same as domestic UK sockets.
You may additionally get 16 or 32 amp blue IEC60309 (ceeform) outlets, and maybe also the red
3-phase types, depending on the type of equipment expected to be used,  

In an environment where power is mostly used for handheld power tools you may see yellow 110v
IEC69309s, but I have only ever seen one factors where this was the case.

Legality is governed by the Electricity at Work act, plus whatever interpretation of it is imposed
by the company's Health & Safety dept. The latter can range from complete indifference to bizarre
and downright nonsensical interpretation of the requirements. .

It is common practice for all plug-in equipment, and things like IEC leads and power strips to be
regularly inspected and/or tested for safety.
There are no specific regulations on connector types, use of power strips etc., just that it is
safe, but see above comment regarding local H&S people....



2010\01\29@170921 by Charles Craft

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I travel with one of these:
  www.belkin.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Product_Id=16212
Pro Series AC Power Adapter Cable    Part # F3A101

Easier than carrying a pack of power cord adapters and I can usually get
a local IEC 320 power cord from my customer for free.
Regardless of country, seems most computer rooms have a big box of them in the corner. :-)

{Original Message removed}

2010\01\29@182614 by Tamas Rudnai

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Usually I have no problem to plug CEE 7/7 and 7/16 into any UK
connectors -- just have to open the shutters with a flat screw driver
or any suitable stick. I know it is not the best way to do that but I
had less problem with this than using any of the converters you can
buy at the airports.

In many bathrooms btw there are special connectors allowing you to use
the European and US plugs and I think few of them even have that funny
45 degree one (Australian?). But those are only for shavers.

Tamas


On Fri, Jan 29, 2010 at 10:08 PM, Charles Craft <spam_OUTchuckseaTakeThisOuTspammindspring.com> wrote:
> I travel with one of these:
>   www.belkin.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Product_Id=16212
> Pro Series AC Power Adapter Cable    Part # F3A101
>
> Easier than carrying a pack of power cord adapters and I can usually get
> a local IEC 320 power cord from my customer for free.
> Regardless of country, seems most computer rooms have a big box of them in the corner. :-)
>
> {Original Message removed}

2010\01\29@190041 by peter green

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face
Tamas Rudnai wrote:
> Usually I have no problem to plug CEE 7/7 and 7/16 into any UK
> connectors -- just have to open the shutters with a flat screw driver
> or any suitable stick. I know it is not the best way to do that
>  
If you do this then you won't have the protection against a plug fuse
(and UK mains wiring is designed assuming there will be a plug fuse to
protect the flex, if it's an older install you may only have the
protection of a very slow 30A rewirable fuse) in the case of the earthed
plug you won't get an earth connection either.

>but I
>had less problem with this than using any of the converters you can
>buy at the airports.
Unfortunately there are also a lot of adaptors sold that will accept those plugs but won't earth them why the regulators tolerate this I have no idea but it seems they do. You can get decent adaptors that have a fuse and have proper earthing connections for schuko plugs but it's not easy.


2010\01\29@191759 by ivp

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> that funny 45 degree one (Australian ?)

That would be right, and NZ too. When I see a UK plug now it
looks enormous in comparison, as the NZ plug is not intended for
as much current (and honestly, do many common home appliances
draw 16A / 3.5kW ?)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power_plugs_and_sockets

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AS_3112

wbr

2010\01\29@205713 by graham foulkes

picon face
Hi
BS1361 is the IEE standard UK wall outlet socket type plug, With 3
rectangular pins and an integral replaceable cartridge fuse, 5, 10 13 amp.
Multistrip outlets based on BS1361 outlets are widely available and used in
domestic, business and retail premises (homes,shops, offices etc.) for most
portable lighting and domestic appliances. The  IEC 60309 range of
connectors are are found in specific industrial areas and outdoor locations,
building sites etc. These are heavy duty (and pricey!) connectors with
locking caps and IP ratings covering a range of configurations from low
voltage, three pin 110 volt center tapped portable appliances  up to 600
volt 3 phase 30 amp, (5 pin) outlets and plugs.  The IEC 302C13 connector
range, three pin 10 amp, are pretty ubiquitous throughout UK and Europe in
light industrial and business premises as extension outlet strips. They take
up much less space and are well suited to light duty, lighting, computer,
printers etc.
I presume your power strip would be supplied as IEC 302C13 type. One further
point, is that most of the BS 1361outlets in office and retail premises are
connected to GFI (RLCB) ground fault interruption devices set at 25 MA.
leakage trip current. Sometimes causes problems with multiple pieces of
equipment with line EMI filters incoporated

On Fri, Jan 29, 2010 at 3:20 PM, Sean Breheny <.....shb7KILLspamspam@spam@cornell.edu> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2010\01\30@115419 by Alan B. Pearce

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>that funny 45 degree one (Australian?).

<VBG> Australia, New Zealand, parts of China, and I suspect a fair part of
SE Asia.

2010\01\31@200852 by Dario Greggio

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Tamas Rudnai ha scritto:
> Usually I have no problem to plug CEE 7/7 and 7/16 into any UK
> connectors -- just have to open the shutters with a flat screw driver
> or any suitable stick. I know it is not the best way to do that but I
> had less problem with this than using any of the converters you can
> buy at the airports.
>
I used to do the same :)

--

Ciao, Dario
--
Cyberdyne


'[EE] UK electric plugs'
2010\02\03@210755 by Sean Breheny
face picon face
Thanks to everyone with their help answering these questions. We had
to specify to a client what kinds of outlets our equipment would need.
We can put whatever kind we want on the cords so what mattered was
just specifying something which met local code and our electrical
requirements. We settled on BS1363 for the computer power strips since
it seems that it is universally available and more than adequate for
the current draw.

Sean


On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 8:08 PM, Dario Greggio <adpm.tospamKILLspaminwind.it> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

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