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'[EE] UART Serial Protocol Analyzer'
2010\02\23@223944 by Xiaofan Chen

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My firmware colleagues are trying to debug some UART related things
(between an MCU and an ASIC, proprietary protocol). We have the
following but it does not seem to support non-standard baud rate. Do
you have other recommendations about this kind of serial analyzer?
http://www.fte.com/products/Serialtest-11.asp

We have the Agilent MSO8104A but the addon serial analyzer
seems to be only for I2C/SPI and CAN. We have dedidated
CAN analyzer from Vector already.
http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/product.jspx?nid=-536902753.536908413.00&cc=US&lc=eng

Thanks.

--
Xiaofan

2010\02\23@224531 by Marcel Birthelmer

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The NCI Go-Logic (cheapest one is $1500 I think) supports all manner
of serial protocols, including RS232.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2010 at 7:39 PM, Xiaofan Chen <spam_OUTxiaofancTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2010\02\23@224724 by David Duffy (AVD)

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Xiaofan Chen wrote:
> My firmware colleagues are trying to debug some UART related things
> (between an MCU and an ASIC, proprietary protocol). We have the
> following but it does not seem to support non-standard baud rate. Do
> you have other recommendations about this kind of serial analyzer?
> http://www.fte.com/products/Serialtest-11.asp
>  

>From that page:

The RS-232 ComProbe II supports data rates up to 921.6Kbps. The user can
pick one of the standard rates in the drop down box in the I/O Settings
dialog. For non-standard rates, the user can simply type in the value in
the box.

David...

--
___________________________________________
David Duffy        Audio Visual Devices P/L
Unit 8, 10 Hook St, Capalaba 4157 Australia
Ph: +61 7 38235717      Fax: +61 7 38234717
Our Web Site: http://www.audiovisualdevices.com.au
___________________________________________

2010\02\23@230224 by Harold Hallikainen

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I really like the DigiView from http://www.tech-tools.com/dv_main.htm . I
use it to analyze SPI, I2C, async (UART), and parallel buses. It's really
nice to just read out the hex or ascii data instead of trying to decode
scope traces. Bit rates on the async display are fully programmable to
whatever you may need.

Harold


--
FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2010\02\23@231448 by Marcel Duchamp

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On 2/23/2010 7:39 PM, Xiaofan Chen wrote:
> My firmware colleagues are trying to debug some UART related things
> (between an MCU and an ASIC, proprietary protocol). We have the
> following but it does not seem to support non-standard baud rate. Do
> you have other recommendations about this kind of serial analyzer?
> http://www.fte.com/products/Serialtest-11.asp
>
> We have the Agilent MSO8104A but the addon serial analyzer
> seems to be only for I2C/SPI and CAN. We have dedidated
> CAN analyzer from Vector already.
> http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/product.jspx?nid=-536902753.536908413.00&cc=US&lc=eng
>
> Thanks.
>

My favorite terminal program is still Terminal V1.9b by Br@y++ and
checking it, it shows all the usual radio button baud rates plus custom.

The custom baud rate allows typing in any number you want; whether this
works or not, I have no idea as I have only used the standard rates but
the program is free to try...

2010\02\24@003551 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 12:14 PM, Marcel Duchamp
<.....marcel.duchampKILLspamspam@spam@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

> My favorite terminal program is still Terminal V1.9b by Br@y++ and
> checking it, it shows all the usual radio button baud rates plus custom.
>
> The custom baud rate allows typing in any number you want; whether this
> works or not, I have no idea as I have only used the standard rates but
> the program is free to try...

I think Terminal by Br@y++ is not useful here. Basically we need a serial
sniffer between two chips. The PC is not communicating with either
one, but rather to capture the communication data.

--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

2010\02\24@004327 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 11:47 AM, David Duffy (AVD)
<davidspamKILLspamaudiovisualdevices.com.au> wrote:
> >From that page:
>
> The RS-232 ComProbe II supports data rates up to 921.6Kbps. The user can
> pick one of the standard rates in the drop down box in the I/O Settings
> dialog. For non-standard rates, the user can simply type in the value in
> the box.
>

Thanks. I think my colleague had already tried that but I will
ask her to check again. We only had one license so my colleague
could not use it right now. The other team is using it.


--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

2010\02\24@005050 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 12:24 PM, Harold Hallikainen
<.....haroldKILLspamspam.....hallikainen.org> wrote:
> I really like the DigiView from http://www.tech-tools.com/dv_main.htm . I
> use it to analyze SPI, I2C, async (UART), and parallel buses. It's really
> nice to just read out the hex or ascii data instead of trying to decode
> scope traces. Bit rates on the async display are fully programmable to
> whatever you may need.
>

Personally I am still using the scopes to help decoding the SPI
communications together with the firmware engineers. But
I think an analyzer would help.

The DigiView looks nice and the price is also not bad. Thanks.
FTE SerialTest seems to be less capable in terms of features
but it has some advantages for us since it supports quite some
specialized industrial serial protocol.


--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

2010\02\24@082724 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Xiaofan Chen wrote:

> On Wed, Feb 24, 2010 at 12:14 PM, Marcel Duchamp wrote:
>
>> My favorite terminal program is still Terminal V1.9b by Br@y++ and
>> checking it, it shows all the usual radio button baud rates plus
>> custom.
>>
>> The custom baud rate allows typing in any number you want; whether
>> this works or not, I have no idea as I have only used the standard
>> rates but the program is free to try...
>
> I think Terminal by Br@y++ is not useful here. Basically we need a
> serial sniffer between two chips. The PC is not communicating with
> either one, but rather to capture the communication data.

Can't you use the RX lines of two RS232 interfaces, connected to two
instances of a terminal program?

Some terminal programs may even have an option to join the two RX lines
in one interface, for a more convenient reading (displaying one as RX,
the other as TX). I don't remember whether the Bray terminal is one of
these, but I've seen this somewhere.

You may need a custom hardware interface, though.

Gerhard

2010\02\24@112531 by John Coppens

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On Wed, 24 Feb 2010 10:27:14 -0300
Gerhard Fiedler <EraseMElistsspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTconnectionbrazil.com> wrote:

> Can't you use the RX lines of two RS232 interfaces, connected to two
> instances of a terminal program?

Note that any PC-based software analyzer can only use RS232 baudrates
which are divisors of 115200 (230400 in some cases). Even though they may
have a user-baud entry, they can't physically produce every possible
rate.

John

2010\02\24@131028 by James Holland

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> ------------------------------
>
> From: John Coppens <johnspamspam_OUTjcoppens.com>
> Subject: Re: [EE] UART Serial Protocol Analyzer
> Note that any PC-based software analyzer can only use RS232 baudrates
> which are divisors of 115200 (230400 in some cases). Even though they may
> have a user-baud entry, they can't physically produce every possible
> rate.
>
> John
>
>

The limitation with a PC is usually that the UART can only handle baud rates
that are a divisor of a fixed frequency (ie 115200). There is no software
limitation on the baud rate with the Windows API although some software
(Hyperterminal springs to mind) will only function with standard rates. For
an odd baud rate a USB/Serial converter implemented as a virtual com port
along with some suitably chosen software is a simple solution.
The Equipment referred to in the original post connects to the monitoring PC
using a USB link.

2010\02\24@135010 by Ivey Cole

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I've been using Docklight for the last several years.  You use two COM ports on the PC and it allows for setting non-standard baud rates, so it would work with the virtual COM ports as described by James.  It's approximately 49 USD.  In my lab environment I use a HP analyzer, but for the road found Docklight and a laptop work well so don't have to lug any additional stuff around.

--- On Wed, 2/24/10, James Holland <@spam@j_hollandKILLspamspambtopenworld.com> wrote:

From: James Holland <KILLspamj_hollandKILLspamspambtopenworld.com>
Subject: Re: [EE] UART Serial Protocol Analyzer
To: RemoveMEpiclistTakeThisOuTspammit.edu
Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 12:10 PM


{Quote hidden}

The limitation with a PC is usually that the UART can only handle baud rates
that are a divisor of a fixed frequency (ie 115200). There is no software
limitation on the baud rate with the Windows API although some software
(Hyperterminal springs to mind) will only function with standard rates. For
an odd baud rate a USB/Serial converter implemented as a virtual com port
along with some suitably chosen software is a simple solution.
The Equipment referred to in the original post connects to the monitoring PC
using a USB link.

2010\02\24@153612 by Forrest Christian

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If you can tolerate the 'capture, then analyze', then you need to get a
selae logic.

That is, it is a logic analyzer that will do serial decoding, of pretty
much any bitrate.

-forrest

On 2/23/10 8:39 PM, Xiaofan Chen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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