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'[EE] U.S. ceiling fan laws'
2011\01\29@231629 by Charles Craft

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I've put in more than my share of ceiling fans between rooms that didn't have one, the metal
was the wrong color for my spouse, rehab, ....

Went looking for one recently and got stung by this.
Most of them now only come with sockets for candelabra or intermediate bulbs.
If you work around this by getting bulb adapters there's a current limiter built into the light kit.


http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/residential/ceiling_fans.html

Ceiling Fans and Ceiling Fan Light Kits

"As required by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established test procedures and energy conservation standards for ceiling fans and for ceiling fan light kits. The standards for ceiling fan light kits apply to certain socket types as of January 1, 2007, and other socket types on January 1, 2009. Links below provide further information for manufacturers and consumers."


"Question #1: How much time may elapse before a current-limiting device must halt operation of a lamp that consumes more than 190 watts in order for the ceiling fan light kit (other than those light kits that have medium screw-based or pin-based sockets for fluorescent lamps) to comply with the energy conservation standards? Has DOE designated specific current limiting technologies that manufacturers must use?

   Answer: The ceiling fan standard does not specify the use of any one technology. Manufacturers may choose to rely on any technology so long as the requirements of the standard are met, including, but not limited to, a fuse, circuit breaker or other current-limiting device. 72 FR 1270."

2011\01\29@232335 by Sean Breheny

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Huh? Effectively mandating that there be a fuse or circuit breaker to
prevent energy-hogging bulbs? This is really bass-ackwards.

Sean


On Sat, Jan 29, 2011 at 11:16 PM, Charles Craft <spam_OUTchuckseaTakeThisOuTspammindspring.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2011\01\30@013319 by Bob Blick

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Note: this is [EE], please constrain yourselves to the technical aspects
of the ceiling fan.

On Sat, 29 Jan 2011 23:16:28 -0500 (GMT-05:00), "Charles Craft" said:

> "Question #1: How much time may elapse before a current-limiting device
> must halt operation of a lamp that consumes more than 190 watts in order

190 watts is huge! That is something like eight large compact
fluorescent bulbs, enough to light several hundred square feet.

Or are you still in the incandescent part of the world where electricity
is too cheap to meter?

I think there are no incandescent lamps within my house. Porch and
garage still have one each, because fluorescent is slow turning on in
cold weather.

But if you really feel the need to burn a kilowatt on lighting, feel
free to bypass the fuse. While you are doing that, consider the thermal
capacity of the lamp sockets.

Best regards,

Bob




-- http://www.fastmail.fm - Or how I learned to stop worrying and
                         love email again

2011\01\30@014830 by Charles Craft

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-----Original Message-----
>From: Bob Blick <.....bobblickKILLspamspam@spam@ftml.net>
>Sent: Jan 30, 2011 1:33 AM
>To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <piclistspamKILLspammit.edu>
>Subject: Re: [EE] U.S. ceiling fan laws
>
>Note: this is [EE], please constrain yourselves to the technical aspects
>of the ceiling fan.
>

(I believe my original post was technical with a smidgen of background info)

We've spent a lot of time choosing the right color CFL bulbs for different parts of the house.
And there's at least one incandescent bulb in every multi-bulb fixture.
It gets pretty cold in Central MN and the thermostat is always at 65 or lower so it takes a while
for the CFL bulbs to put out decent light.
Trying to find the right color CFL bulbs for a candelabra (E12) or intermediate (E17) base isn't
something you pick up at the local farm and feed store out here in Lake Wobegon.

chuckc

2011\01\30@015721 by Charles Craft

picon face
-----Original Message-----
>From: Bob Blick <.....bobblickKILLspamspam.....ftml.net>
>Sent: Jan 30, 2011 1:33 AM
>To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <EraseMEpiclistspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu>
>Subject: Re: [EE] U.S. ceiling fan laws
>
>Note: this is [EE], please constrain yourselves to the technical aspects
>of the ceiling fan.
>

I missed this. [EE] used to be Everything Engineering.
Didn't realize there was a [TECH] tag. Wonder what good stuff I've been missing over there?


http://old.nabble.com/PICLIST-admin-stuff-td18424752.html

Parent Message unknown PICLIST admin stuff
Click to flag this post

by Dan Smith-11 Jul 12, 2008; 07:26pm :: Rate this Message: - Use ratings to moderate (?)

Reply | Print | View Threaded | Show Only this Message
I'd like to welcome Bob Blick and Russell to the admin team as list
moderators :-)

We've set up another topic tag called [TECH] which Russell has agreed
to police (along with [OT]).  Bob will be helping to police the [PIC]
and [EE] tags.  This will allow us to refocus some of the other tags.

2011\01\30@193201 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Jan 29, 2011, at 10:48 PM, Charles Craft wrote:

> Trying to find the right color CFL bulbs for a candelabra (E12) or  
> intermediate (E17) base isn't
> something you pick up at the local farm and feed store out here in  
> Lake Wobegon.

Yeah; it is particularly annoying that "regulation" is attempting to  enforce low-energy bulbs by requiring fixtures that only accept  particular types of energy-efficient bulbs, while "technology" is  creating the most variety of energy-efficient bulbs in forms that fit  "standard" sockets.
For example, in-ceiling lighting fixtures are required to be  externally-balasted bi-pin or quad-pin fluorescent, which greatly  restricts the range of bulbs you can use, makes ballast replacement a  relatively difficult and expensive proposition, and essentially  eliminates the ability to experiment with LED-based bulbs.  Ceiling  fans with candelabra base sockets are similarly limiting, and much  more likely to get 4x40W incandecents than the 4x"60W equiv" (20W)  CFLs someone might put in if there were standard-base sockets.

(anyone want to go into business designing LED lamps aimed at the bulb- side of a fluorescent ballast?)

BillW

2011\01\31@012740 by Bob Blick

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Thank you for your insight into the terrible burden put upon you. I
liked analog TV, too. But I got over it. No more horse-and-buggy days.

Since they are intentionally not commonly available I even manage to
make an RPSMA adapter when I need to connect an RF device to my spectrum
analyzer.

And I taught myself to solder with that new-fangled stuff without lead.

There was some nice blue sky today and I did lots of chores and didn't
have to read anyone's whining about minor "annoyances".

Who was it that said there's no crying in baseball? Well, it should have
been "there's no whining in [EE]".

Reply offlist if you really feel the need.

Bob

On Sun, 30 Jan 2011 16:31 -0800, "William Chops Westfield"
<westfwspamspam_OUTmac.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - One of many happy users:
 http://www.fastmail.fm/docs/quotes.html


'[EE] U.S. ceiling fan laws'
2011\02\01@232738 by Jonathan Hallameyer
picon face

Have wirenuts and strippers, will fix as needed.
-Jon

On Sat, Jan 29, 2011 at 11:23 PM, Sean Breheny <@spam@shb7KILLspamspamcornell.edu> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> -

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