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'[EE] Sound meter recommendations'
2007\06\21@044930 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I've bought some green glue to test it's damping abilities,
>and now I'm looking for a good sound meter. Not too expensive,
>but reliable. I saw a few on eBay, but wasn't sure which to pick.

Do you really need a sound meter, or are you only after relative
measurements? If the latter then any microphone and AC millivoltmeter with
dB scale should do.

2007\06\21@184540 by Vitaliy

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face
> >I've bought some green glue to test it's damping abilities,
>>and now I'm looking for a good sound meter. Not too expensive,
>>but reliable. I saw a few on eBay, but wasn't sure which to pick.
>
> Do you really need a sound meter, or are you only after relative
> measurements? If the latter then any microphone and AC millivoltmeter with
> dB scale should do.

I'm gathering proof for the landlord, so it needs to be fairly accurate. $50
or even $100 sounds like a good investment, if we can get him to pay the $k
necessary to fix the problem.

2007\06\21@231651 by Robert Rolf

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Vitaliy wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Just get your local bylaw officer to come by to make a measurement for a
'noise complaint'. The ticket the landlord gets should be proof enough of
the 'problem'.

R

2007\06\26@152643 by Vitaliy

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Robert Rolf wrote:
>>>>I've bought some green glue to test it's damping abilities,
>>>>and now I'm looking for a good sound meter. Not too expensive,
>>>>but reliable. I saw a few on eBay, but wasn't sure which to pick.
>>>
>>>Do you really need a sound meter, or are you only after relative
>>>measurements? If the latter then any microphone and AC millivoltmeter
>>>with
>>>dB scale should do.
>>
>>
>> I'm gathering proof for the landlord, so it needs to be fairly accurate.
>> $50
>> or even $100 sounds like a good investment, if we can get him to pay the
>> $k
>> necessary to fix the problem.
>
> Just get your local bylaw officer to come by to make a measurement for a
> 'noise complaint'. The ticket the landlord gets should be proof enough of
> the 'problem'.

Bylaw officer? What's that? :)  I'd like to maintain a good relationship
with the neighbors, but we may need to eventually go that route (depending
on the landlord's attitude).

We already got a formal report from a local soundproofing company (paid $200
for a guy to come out, yap for an hour, and take a couple of measurements
with a sound meter).

By the way, I bought this JTS-1357 sound level meter:

http://www.amazon.com/Mastech-digital-sound-level-meter/dp/B00067L420

I don't know much about sound meters, but it looks pretty good, even has a
nice plastic carrying case.

By the way, a question for those who know -- which weighting should I use
for measuring equipment noise (A or C)? Why is C registering higher noise
levels -- I thought it simply enabled the low-pass filter?

Vitaliy

2007\06\27@043055 by Graham North

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face

>By the way, I bought this JTS-1357 sound level meter:
>
>http://www.amazon.com/Mastech-digital-sound-level-meter/dp/B00067L420
>
>I don't know much about sound meters, but it looks pretty good, even
has a
>nice plastic carrying case.
>
>By the way, a question for those who know -- which weighting should I
use
>for measuring equipment noise (A or C)? Why is C registering higher
noise
>levels -- I thought it simply enabled the low-pass filter?
>
>Vitaliy


A weighting simulates the human ear, which typically has a poor high and
low frequency response, so if you have a sound with a lot of high and
low frequency content C weighting will give a higher figure.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A-weighting

There are standards for measuring all types of noise; environmental,
noise nuisance etc, I recommend you do some digging on google if you
want to measure things correctly.

Don't expect any measurements from that meter to stand up in court
though :-(

G
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2007\06\27@130514 by Vitaliy

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Graham North wrote:
> A weighting simulates the human ear, which typically has a poor high and
> low frequency response, so if you have a sound with a lot of high and
> low frequency content C weighting will give a higher figure.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A-weighting
>
> There are standards for measuring all types of noise; environmental,
> noise nuisance etc, I recommend you do some digging on google if you
> want to measure things correctly.

Oh, I see. So I'm getting higher numbers for C weighting because it's adding
the equipment vibrations and low-frequency noise to the A weighting.


> Don't expect any measurements from that meter to stand up in court
> though :-(

Why not? :)

By the way, the guy who came in and charged $200 for an hour of yapping
about other people's sound problems, had a meter just like the one on
Wikipedia.

Vitaliy

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