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'[EE] Soldering'
2008\12\19@193403 by solarwind

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So I gave my huge weller 140 watt gun type soldering iron in my basement a try.

I soldered two wires together. I noticed that, I needed to tin the tip
to properly transfer heat to the joint. Also, after the iron heated
up, I touched the tinned tip to the joint and had to wait a few
seconds for the joint to get hot enough to melt the solder. It's
leaded solder I believe.

This caused the entire wire to become quite warm to the touch (even
through the insulation). My only concern is that when I do this (with
a pencil type 15 - 20 watt iron) I will overheat and damage the
components. How do I heat just the joint and not the entire component
and damage it? (When I do get around to soldering my pics and stuff...

--
solarwind

2008\12\19@194802 by Jinx

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> How do I heat just the joint and not the entire component and damage it ?

Using thin gauge solder helps. Like 1.0mm for general work and perhaps
0.8mm for delicates. The trick is not dithering and only practice can help
you there. As well as forming the joint, solder is also the vector to transfer
heat to make the joint. Contamination, like an unclean tip and leads, acts as
an insulator. The flux in the solder will aid flow and having a fine wire brush
to clean the tip and leads helps the flux. Some larger component leads may
even need a scrape with a fine file to expose bare metal

Shiny is good

2008\12\19@195657 by Bob Blick

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On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 19:34:01 -0500, "solarwind"
<spam_OUTx.solarwind.xTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> said:
> So I gave my huge weller 140 watt gun type soldering iron in my basement
> a try.

Each time I haul out and dust off my soldering gun I loosen and tighten
the two tip nuts to insure a good connection.

> I soldered two wires together. I noticed that, I needed to tin the tip
> to properly transfer heat to the joint. Also, after the iron heated
> up, I touched the tinned tip to the joint and had to wait a few
> seconds for the joint to get hot enough to melt the solder. It's
> leaded solder I believe.

Leaded solder is the best, use it while it is still available. Just
don't chew it :)

Solder allows the tip of the iron to transfer heat, and fresh solder
transfers heat best - always wet the tip with fresh solder and
everything goes faster with less overall heating. Then heat damage won't
ever be a problem.

Cheers,

Bob

--
http://www.fastmail.fm - Choose from over 50 domains or use your own

2008\12\19@212825 by solarwind

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On Fri, Dec 19, 2008 at 7:56 PM, Bob Blick <.....bobblickKILLspamspam@spam@ftml.net> wrote:
> On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 19:34:01 -0500, "solarwind"
> Leaded solder is the best, use it while it is still available. Just
> don't chew it :)

What do you mean still available?

--
solarwind

2008\12\19@213152 by Dr Skip

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Besides the other suggestions...

Use a socket for the PIC and other expensive parts

Use a clamp heat sink if it's a leaded component like a diode

Don't try to solder a large lead to a small expensive one

Try to heat (contact) both parts at the same time, and have a little solder on
the tip so there's good thermal contact to begin with. That's not the solder
that will fill the joint, it's just so you get more than an edge to edge
touching of iron to leads.

If the solder seems to ball up on whatever parts you have, or it seems they
have to get very hot before it wets, get some paste rosin flux and dab a little
on the lead first.

Practice first.



solarwind wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\12\19@213645 by Jinx

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> > Leaded solder is the best, use it while it is still available. Just
> > don't chew it :)
>
> What do you mean still available?

Google RoHS

2008\12\19@214033 by Bob Blick

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solarwind wrote:
> On Fri, Dec 19, 2008 at 7:56 PM, Bob Blick <bobblickspamKILLspamftml.net> wrote:
>> On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 19:34:01 -0500, "solarwind"
>> Leaded solder is the best, use it while it is still available. Just
>> don't chew it :)
>
> What do you mean still available?

In some countries it's only available for repair. In the USA sooner or
later we will follow.

Currently all the products I design are manufactured using lead-free
processes, even though they are sold mostly in the USA.

Lead-free solder is awful. It is very hot and doesn't flow well, and is
never "shiny" so spotting bad connections is harder. You can really ruin
connectors and switches soldering to them with the temperatures required
for lead-free solder.

Best regards,

Bob



2008\12\19@214118 by solarwind

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So I should stock up on leaded solder?

2008\12\19@215412 by Bob Blick

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solarwind wrote:
> So I should stock up on leaded solder?

Just stay subscribed to the piclist. When it appears the end is nigh
there will be plenty of outcry.

I wonder what will happen to the pricing of leaded solder over the next
few years? It's still quite affordable. Has there been a glut of it
caused by the shift to lead-free elsewhere?

Lead-free solder is certainly pricey.

Cheers,

Bob

2008\12\19@221303 by John Chung

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SolarWind,

Try to watch all the videos from here:
http://solder.net/technical/iPodtips.asp

GREAT tutorials and you need to change your
soldering tools :)

I use the following:

Sponge
Isoproply
No clean flux(Important ingredient!)
thin solder wire(as mention)
brass brush(to clean the tip after each session)
antex soldering pen.....(as long as it works well)

Regards,
John






     

2008\12\19@222549 by apptech

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Copied from the bottom:

If you don't not only do basic research on the most basic of subjects, but
give an indication that you have done so if you have done so, then you are
going to bring the censorious ravings of the alpha-males down on your head,
and then everyone will yell at each other (again), and then ... we are NOT
going to have a repeat of the last few weeks. So if it happens again just
maybe EVERYONE who gets involved in the yelling sessions gets a short sharp
dose of moderation. Which always starts more yelling. So lets try not to
start. (Alpha males also please note).

_______________________________________

Given the zillions of articles on the web on soldering ...

This presumably came as no surprise.
> I soldered two wires together. I noticed that, I needed to tin the tip
> to properly transfer heat to the joint.

nor this
> Also, after the iron heated
> up, I touched the tinned tip to the joint and had to wait a few
> seconds for the joint to get hot enough to melt the solder.

> I t's leaded solder I believe.

Most of the solder 'around the place' will be.
Much is '60/40' (Google knows).
Some little will be aimed at Alumin[i]um soldering. Rare.
Some little ill be slver solder and similar specialist.
More modern solder may be lead free and an abomination to use (Google knows)

> This caused the entire wire to become quite warm to the touch (even
> through the insulation).
Also, I imagine, no great surprise.

> My only concern is that when I do this (with
> a pencil type 15 - 20 watt iron) I will overheat and damage the
> components. How do I heat just the joint and not the entire component
> and damage it? (When I do get around to soldering my pics and stuff...

The answer to that is an extremely easy one.
Read a few of the zillions of articles on the web on soldering.
Repeat until you get the idea.
And/or read PICListarchive material on same until suitably informed.

When you have found it come back and tell us.
ie soldering is a basic electrical construction skill which has been part of
the amateur constructors necessary skill set for many many mnay decades.
As such there is an inordinate amount of information about it on web and in
books and more. You can probably even find (shudder) U tube videos on
electronic soldering 101.

Asking questions about basic soldering skills on list is liable to bring a
hail of not totally misplaced abuse down on your head re RTFine(they tell
me)Manual et al. It doesn't sound from what you wrote (regardless of what
you actually did) as if you have as much as Gargoyled "soldering" (11.5
million hits) nor "electronic soldering" (380,000+ hits) nor ... .

If you had done the latter (or have) you'd find the very first hit to be
useful. Viz
   http://www.epemag.wimborne.co.uk/solderfaq.htm
   www.epemag.wimborne.co.uk/solderfaq.htm#irons
Like perhaps unto it
   http://www.elexp.com/t_solder.htm
   www.essortment.com/home/solderingiront_sagx.htm
   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldering

and more.

If you don't not only do basic research on the most basic of subjects, but
give an indication that you have done so if you have done so, then you are
going to bring the censorious ravings of ther alpha-males down on your head,
and then everyone will yell at each other (again), and then ... we are NOT
going to have a repeat of the last few weeks. So just maybe everyone who
gets involved in the yelling sessions gets a short sharp dose of moderation.
Which always starts more yelling. So lets try not to start. (Alpha males
also please note).


  Russell




2008\12\19@224429 by apptech

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> Lead-free solder is awful. It is very hot and doesn't flow well, and is
> never "shiny" so spotting bad connections is harder. You can really ruin
> connectors and switches soldering to them with the temperatures required
> for lead-free solder.

... and under many conditions grows tin whiskers which will bridge small
gaps in time. And some large gaps in more time.
Gargoyle 'tin whisker' solder.

At least one communications satellite is believed to have died due to this
problem.(In 1998. Galaxy IV, a Hughes HS-601)

       http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Galaxy-IV

Here's a discussion of a NASA paper which anaylyses the threat to the Space
Shuttle and Space Station from tin whiskers [!].

     http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2006/06/nasa-rebuttal-of-tin-whisker-dissent/


        Russell McMahon

2008\12\20@090951 by olin piclist

face picon face
solarwind wrote:
> How do I heat just the joint and not the entire component
> and damage it? (When I do get around to soldering my pics and stuff...

Leads conduct heat and the part will heat up.  They can take that for some
combination of time and temperature.  See the data sheet.

When soldering small stuff, set the temperature to 600F and keep the tip
clean and tinned.  Once you develop good technique, which takes practise
like any other skill, it will only take a few seconds for each lead.  5
seconds at 600F on a lead won't damage most normal parts, including PICs.

Also, I asked this before you never answered: Where are you located?


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Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

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