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'[EE] Silicone Caulk'
2008\04\12@112043 by Josh Koffman

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Hi all. I'm looking at using some silicone caulk to help secure a
couple of connectors against vibration on my current project. We've
talked about this a bunch in the past and I know I don't want anything
that uses acetic acid. Does anyone have any recommendations for
something I could get at a home improvement store in the United States
that might meet this requirement? Or should I just go and start
reading labels? I seem to recall someone mentioning the GE II stuff
but I can't be sure and I didn't find anything in the search I did.

Thanks!

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
-Douglas Adams

2008\04\12@114528 by Jack Smith

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Dow Corning 748 works - it's "neutral cure" and you may find it at a
good hardware store. There are other Dow Corning formulations also rated
for electronic work, but I like the 748 for general purpose use.

The key words are "neutral cure" or "non-corrosive sealant." You may
also find it at a good boat supply store if it's not at the hardware
emporium.

If you can't find it locally, McMaster Carr will sell you a 3 ounce tube
for $7.46 plus shipping. http://www.mcmaster.com/
Order via  the Internet and you will have it in a day or two.

Jack


Josh Koffman wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\04\12@120443 by Bob Axtell

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Josh Koffman wrote:
> Hi all. I'm looking at using some silicone caulk to help secure a
> couple of connectors against vibration on my current project. We've
> talked about this a bunch in the past and I know I don't want anything
> that uses acetic acid. Does anyone have any recommendations for
> something I could get at a home improvement store in the United States
> that might meet this requirement? Or should I just go and start
> reading labels? I seem to recall someone mentioning the GE II stuff
> but I can't be sure and I didn't find anything in the search I did.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Josh
>  
Actually acetic acid as a curing agent is long of tooth. Newer compounds
contain NO acetic
acid. Google for some of Dow Corning's stuff.

--Bob A

2008\04\12@132500 by Josh Koffman

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On Sat, Apr 12, 2008 at 9:04 AM, Bob Axtell <spam_OUTengineerTakeThisOuTspamcotse.net> wrote:
>  Actually acetic acid as a curing agent is long of tooth. Newer compounds
>  contain NO acetic
>  acid. Google for some of Dow Corning's stuff.

Interesting...so I wonder if whatever new stuff they're using is
better or worse than acetic acid?

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
-Douglas Adams

2008\04\12@132549 by Josh Koffman

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On Sat, Apr 12, 2008 at 8:45 AM, Jack Smith <.....Jack.SmithKILLspamspam@spam@cox.net> wrote:
> Dow Corning 748 works - it's "neutral cure" and you may find it at a
>  good hardware store. There are other Dow Corning formulations also rated
>  for electronic work, but I like the 748 for general purpose use.
>
>  The key words are "neutral cure" or "non-corrosive sealant." You may
>  also find it at a good boat supply store if it's not at the hardware
>  emporium.
>
>  If you can't find it locally, McMaster Carr will sell you a 3 ounce tube
>  for $7.46 plus shipping. http://www.mcmaster.com/
>  Order via  the Internet and you will have it in a day or two.

Thanks for the tip!

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
-Douglas Adams

2008\04\12@172523 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Hi all. I'm looking at using some silicone caulk to help
> secure a
> couple of connectors against vibration on my current
> project. We've
> talked about this a bunch in the past and I know I don't
> want anything
> that uses acetic acid. Does anyone have any
> recommendations for
> something I could get at a home improvement store in the
> United States
> that might meet this requirement? Or should I just go and
> start
> reading labels? I seem to recall someone mentioning the GE
> II stuff
> but I can't be sure and I didn't find anything in the
> search I did.

The phrase "neutral cure" is usually used for the non
acid-cure variety. These actually reduce ethyl alcohol
during cure - not usually a problem. Just don't lick too too
much of it while it's setting.

FWIW I have found neutral cure silicon rubbers to be amongst
the most long lasting and persistently tenacious of bonding
materials. While they work with 'almost everything' they do
not bond well to a few plastics so a little research may be
useful.


       Russell




2008\04\12@191321 by Peter van Hoof

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I would recomend hot melt glue it's easy to apply
bonds instantly and it works great for locking against vibration

Peter van Hoof


{Original Message removed}

2008\04\12@212244 by Matt Pobursky

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My experience with hot melt glue has been just the opposite,
*especially* when vibration was involved. It seems like every other
electronic assembly I look at that has used hot melt ends up with a glob of
hot melt attached to one component or wire and nothing else or rattling
around inside the enclosure. ;-)

On the other hand, I specify silicone adhesive fairly regularly in
production assemblies for high heat and vibration applications and have
seen virtually no failures.

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

On Sat, 12 Apr 2008 16:12:59 -0700 (PDT), Peter van Hoof wrote:
> I would recomend hot melt glue it's easy to apply
> bonds instantly and it works great for locking against vibration

2008\04\13@002706 by Apptech

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>> I would recomend hot melt glue it's easy to apply
>> bonds instantly and it works great for locking against
>> vibration

Matt said:

{Quote hidden}

I agree that hot melt does not last.
Initially it is fast and convenient but it does not adhere
long term unless it is mechanically "keyed" to a surface. ie
if a 'blob' of hot melt extends through a hole in a sheet
etc and then deforms on the other side so that it cannot be
withdrawn it may 'rattle' but will still bond.

I agree with Matt that silicon rubbers provide long term
adhesion in most cases.

Note that the hard white component-locating adhesive seen in
many Asian sourced products also fails in a year or two in
the same way that hotmelt does.



       Russell

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