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'[EE] Pronouncing RoHS'
2008\01\28@173912 by Zik Saleeba

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Is there any conventional way of pronouncing "RoHS"?

I pronounce it as the letters "arr oh aitch ess". But what's driving
me mad is that a guy where I work is calling it "rosh". He says it
with such style and confidence that other people here are now starting
to imitate him and call it "rosh" too. Do other people call it "rosh"
or is this just something he's made up?

Cheers,
(Pedantic) Zik

2008\01\28@175255 by M. Adam Davis

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I've heard several different pronunciations, with "roe-hoss" being the
one I hear most frequently and favor.  Primarily because it's a
slightly less abbreviate version:

Restriction of Hazardous Substances
RoHaS

I've heard other people calling it rosh, but that grates on my
pronunciation nerves a tiny bit.  Are there _any_ English words that
end in "hs" that make a sh sound?

The other pronunciation I've heard is "rose" but with the soft s as in
simple rather than the z of rose and nose.

-Adam

On 1/28/08, Zik Saleeba <spam_OUTzikTakeThisOuTspamzikzak.net> wrote:
> Is there any conventional way of pronouncing "RoHS"?
>
> I pronounce it as the letters "arr oh aitch ess". But what's driving
> me mad is that a guy where I work is calling it "rosh". He says it
> with such style and confidence that other people here are now starting
> to imitate him and call it "rosh" too. Do other people call it "rosh"
> or is this just something he's made up?
>
> Cheers,
> (Pedantic) Zik
> -

2008\01\28@181934 by Martin Klingensmith

face
flavicon
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>
> On 1/28/08, Zik Saleeba <.....zikKILLspamspam@spam@zikzak.net> wrote:
>> Is there any conventional way of pronouncing "RoHS"?
>>
>> I pronounce it as the letters "arr oh aitch ess". But what's driving
>> me mad is that a guy where I work is calling it "rosh". He says it
>> with such style and confidence that other people here are now starting
>> to imitate him and call it "rosh" too. Do other people call it "rosh"
>> or is this just something he's made up?
>>
>> Cheers,
>> (Pedantic) Zik
>>

I say "rose" with a soft 's' as well. I despise the rohoss and rosh
pronunciations ;) or I just say "lead free" which I realize doesn't have
the same meaning, but usually suffices in my business.
-
Martin

2008\01\28@182126 by PAUL James

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All,

*** Are there _any_ English words that end in "hs" that make a sh sound?
***

I can't think of any, but along a similar vein, how about "FAVRE"
pronounced as if it were apelled FARVE.
As in "Bret Favre" the football player.


       
Regards,

       
Jim


{Original Message removed}

2008\01\28@190407 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Jan 29, 2008 6:52 AM, M. Adam Davis <stienmanspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:
> I've heard several different pronunciations, with "roe-hoss" being the
> one I hear most frequently and favor.  Primarily because it's a
> slightly less abbreviate version:
>
> Restriction of Hazardous Substances
> RoHaS

What I heard (from a US standard expert) is that this is wrong
pronunciation but it is very common in US. The reason he
told us is that many people can not easily pronounce the
correct "rosh" like sound which the French people can
easily pronounce.

> I've heard other people calling it rosh, but that grates on my
> pronunciation nerves a tiny bit.  Are there _any_ English words that
> end in "hs" that make a sh sound?
> The other pronunciation I've heard is "rose" but with the soft s as in
> simple rather than the z of rose and nose.
>

He told us the correct sound is between "rosh" and "rose".
After all, ROHS directive is not invented by US. It is original
a European directive. So do not expect that it should be
pronounced in an American English way. And again, even
though US English is widely imitated now in some
non-English-speaking countries, it is still not considered to be
the standard English in many English-speaking countries now.

But I admit I have problems with pronouncing the correct
sound. So I just pronounce it as "R O H S".

Xiaofan

2008\01\28@193705 by Bob Barr

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On Mon, 28 Jan 2008 17:20:40 -0600, "PAUL James" wrote:

>
>All,
>
>*** Are there _any_ English words that end in "hs" that make a sh sound?
>***
>
>I can't think of any, but along a similar vein, how about "FAVRE"
>pronounced as if it were apelled FARVE.
>As in "Bret Favre" the football player.
>

Maybe he's dyslexic. :=)


Regards, Bob

2008\01\28@194233 by Dwayne Reid

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At 03:38 PM 1/28/2008, Zik Saleeba wrote:
>Is there any conventional way of pronouncing "RoHS"?

I mostly hear it pronounced as "row hoss" - two syllables.  Anyone
who has ever watched the TV series "Bonanza" knows how "Hoss" is
pronounced <grin>.

Come to think of it, "Row" has a couple of different ways you can say
it - I mean as in "row a boat" or "rows of something planted in a garden".

dwayne



--
Dwayne Reid   <.....dwaynerKILLspamspam.....planet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax
http://www.trinity-electronics.com
Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing

2008\01\28@194448 by Apptech

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face
> He told us the correct sound is between "rosh" and "rose".
> After all, ROHS directive is not invented by US. It is
> original
> a European directive. So do not expect that it should be
> pronounced in an American English way. And again, even
> though US English is widely imitated now in some
> non-English-speaking countries, it is still not considered
> to be
> the standard English in many English-speaking countries
> now.
>
> But I admit I have problems with pronouncing the correct
> sound. So I just pronounce it as "R O H S".


I know that many people will dispute this clear and obvious
factual clarification :-)

The ONLY "correct" pronunciation of any acronym is the
naming of its individual letters sequentially. Anything else
is local interpretation.
Hence we don't have IB-IM or eye-BIM or IB-em or whatever.
We just have I. B. M.
We also don't have ICK-BIMs, ICKIB-EMS, eye-CIB-ems and the
like. We have I. C. B. M. s.
Right ?
:-)

The result may change with speakers maiden tongue.;-)
My favourite motorcycle of years gone by was
   to me always a SEE ZED
   to USAians it was a SEE ZEE
   and to the Czechs, who should know, as they make them,
it was something unpronounceable to me that sounded summat
like CHAY ZUDD.
   That's all short for the abbreviation of Ceske Zavode
(add speech marks as requisite) to C.Z.

SO (he argued)[tm]
the ONLY way to pronounce ROHS sensibly is R. O. H. S.
Which is the only way that I have ever heard it said, FWIW.

Here that's AR OH AITCH ESS
In Oz it's AR OH Haitch ESS.
Elsewhere it's ... ?

But, as I said, I know that many people will dispute this
clear and obvious factual clarification :-)



           Russell





2008\01\28@201307 by Martin Klingensmith

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Apptech wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I can't believe I'm doing this:
Russell, Mr. Pedantic, an acronym is actually a subset of an
abbreviation that is supposed to be a pronounceable word, like RADAR or
LASER. Now, I don't know if RoHS is supposed to be an acronym, but if
not, it's just an abbreviation.
-
Martin

2008\01\28@202042 by Jinx

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> Here that's AR OH AITCH ESS
> In Oz it's AR OH Haitch ESS.

Roaches it is then

2008\01\28@202353 by Jinx

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> I don't know if RoHS is supposed to be an acronym, but if
> not, it's just an abbreviation.

You'd think an easy one like USDA would be pronounced, but
I've only ever heard it spelled out. Like FIA. Unlike FIFA

2008\01\28@204730 by Forrest Christian

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Martin Klingensmith wrote:
> an acronym is actually a subset of an abbreviation that is supposed to
> be a pronounceable word, like RADAR or LASER. Now, I don't know if
> RoHS is supposed to be an acronym, but if not, it's just an abbreviation.
Just be glad that you don't work for the Department of Public Health and
Human Services in my state.... or DPHHS.

Someone should have tried to pronounce that one before they renamed the
agency a few years ago...

Back on topic, or at least semi-on-topic, the way I would pronounce RoHS
would be based on my opinion of the directive, which may or may not be
repeatable in mixed company depending on how irritated I am about it at
any given time.

-forrest

2008\01\28@205514 by Jinx

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> DPHHS.
>
> Someone should have tried to pronounce that one before they
> renamed the agency a few years ago...

dufus ?

2008\01\28@233554 by Charles Craft

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And up North here it's Brat Favre as in the weiner. :-)

-----Original Message-----
{Quote hidden}

>> --

2008\01\29@022540 by Apptech

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> I can't believe I'm doing this:

[It worked :-)]

> Russell, Mr. Pedantic,

[I have him now]

> an acronym is actually a subset of an
> abbreviation that is supposed to be a pronounceable word,
> like RADAR or
> LASER. Now, I don't know if RoHS is supposed to be an
> acronym, but if
> not, it's just an abbreviation.

I know. You'll note the :-) fore and aft, and the so obvious
that it's clearly tongue in cheek, flame bait also fore and
aft.
I actually think that what I said makes pretty good sense,
but I just KNOW that it won't sit comfortably with many.

I agree that acronyms are made to be abused and that some
are pretty easy to get as intended (eg LASER). But an
acronym that is not self pronouncing (as it were) aint much
of one. And any SERIOUS descriptor SHOULDN'T [tm] be an
acronym unless it  just happens that way. eg LASER is fine
because they invented a neat toy and wanted a snappy name,
but ROHS has no right have its functionality defined by how
they want people to pronounce its acronym - especially so if
people subsequently CAN'T pronounce it consistently ;-).

By your argument and mine combined [tug gently on line to
embed hook in jaw] ROHS is not an acronym, but an
abbreviation, so should be pronounced by naming its letters.
viz AR OH aitch/HAITCH ESS. No?

A relatively recent lesson in life for me (some will have
learned it decades younger) is that either there is NO
correct pronunciation of a word in international use OR you
have it wrong (and I do too :-) ).  eg how does/should one
pronounce "Euro" - the currency unit. I'd (and did) say
"YOU-ROE", but found that in parts of YOO-RIP they leaned
towards EYE-ROE. Mayhaps I was really in EYE-RIP at the time
(looked more like JER-MAN-EEE / OSS-TREE-UH and thereabouts.
My daughter (hails from Planet YWAM so is at home in any
country) says that my subsequent tendency to say EYE-ROE is
just as wrong as YOU-ROW and teh pro-nun-shee-ay-shun across
the whole of [you|eye]-RIP varies widely and I have simply
latched onto one of many pronunciations.




       R


2008\01\29@025524 by William \Chops\ Westfield

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On Jan 28, 2008, at 10:42 PM, Apptech wrote:

> looked more like JER-MAN-EEE

Oh, you mean "Deutschland" ?

I've never quite figured out how there can be that much difference  
between what a country calls itself and what everyone else calls it.  
I mean, maybe in the long-ago politically-incorrect past, but if  
China (another one!) or India can change the names of their major  
cities more or less at will, why can't there be ONE pronounciation  
for each country (local mangling aside, and alphabet conversion  
allowed...)

BillW

2008\01\29@041049 by wouter van ooijen

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> I've never quite figured out how there can be that much difference  
> between what a country calls itself and what everyone else
> calls it.  

For a start: should we call ourselves "Nederland" or "Holland"? If
"Nederland" (which is our official name), why blame the rest of the
world for remembering that it used to be '*de* verenigde nederlanden'
hence *the* netherlands (or, translated almost literally) "le Pay-Bas"?

As a child I used to be upset because one of our southern provinces is
called "*North* Brabant" (the souther part is in Flanders), and nobody
could explain me why there is a "Norwegen" buth no "Southwegen". The
world is so nicely inconsistent.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu



2008\01\29@045447 by Apptech

face
flavicon
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>> looked more like JER-MAN-EEE
>
> Oh, you mean "Deutschland" ?

Super Alice?

Or, for New Zealanders -

       "Auckland, Auckland U...."

{Quote hidden}

Ignoring the fact that countries like India and China are
essentially a vast number of countries ... .

China apparently changed the alphabet and phonetic systems
for the 'Romanji' [tm][Jp] versions of its names some while
ago. The language suddenly sprouted X's and Q's and more.
The trouble is that they use phonetics for the English
transliterations that in many cases bear only an approximate
relationship to what I expect them to sound like.

Mr 'Zhou' is Mr Joe. As they have the sound and are
borrowing our alphabet, why not use a J? [Yeah, I know the
linguists will explain why it 'must' be so].[A linguist
friend who spent decades in darkest PNG once explained what
goes into such processes. Hand coding in assembler is far
more attractive].

In eg Beijing/Peking, having a map can be useful as long as
you can read it yourself using the general shapes and names
of major features as navigation aids. If you are reduced to
trying to match street names on maps with those on road
signs, give up and look for a subway. Not only do the
English street signpost names not match the map street names
but the Chinese script one don't either. So no amount of
staring at the hieroglyphs (Chinese version) allowed me to
translate a sign into its map equivalent or vice versa.

If I showed a map to a taxi driver or to the resident of a
house or shop they would point out where I was. On no
occasion did what they showed me match what later turned out
to be reality. A resident and a taxi driver at the same
address confidently showed me different map locations,
neither of which was correct.

At the factory where I was working, nobody, including the
driver Mr Yuan (who I renamed Mr RMB and that became his new
name to everyone's amusement) could show me on a map where
the factory was located. Not even close - not within say 10
km.

I finally unpacked a GPS unit I had brought with me and
logged the Hotel Factory route. Wikimapia showed an empty
site where the factory now stands but it's clearly the
correct place.

Do not expect (unless a linguistic sponge) to be able to say
chinese place names in a manner which can be under stood. Or
the names of famous people. Even after you swap from Mao Tse
Tund to Mao Zhe Dong (or thereabouts) and say it 10 times
after your host, don't expect them to understand you. Chiang
Kai Shek is not what he's called (if he ever gets
mentioned). And the great father of moder China San Yat Sen
is also someone else.

I can now say "Long Fu Da Sha" well enough to have half a
chance of the taxi driver understanding me on the 10th try.
Spit out the Da Sha in what seems to be a comic and over
emphasised manner and it seems to work. That's the posh
extablishment in front of the access way to my budget 2*
retreat. Once there you force the taxi driver into the
bowels of the back streets and he responds incredulously as
the ferengi takes him 100m+ down narrowing lanes and rubble
littered byways to an obscurely positioned but superb value
for money hotel only 5 minutes bicycle ride from central
Beijing. Must remember how to say ... Da Sha .... . :-)



       Russell


2008\01\29@062133 by Alan B. Pearce

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>The trouble is that they use phonetics for the English
>transliterations that in many cases bear only an approximate
>relationship to what I expect them to sound like.

Hah, I can relate to what you are saying. We have a Chinese student staying
with us, and attempting to understand his English does get challenging at
times. We haven't quite got to the stage of writing things down, but
sometimes it gets close. ;)

2008\01\29@072210 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: spamBeGonepiclist-bouncesspamBeGonespammit.edu [TakeThisOuTpiclist-bouncesEraseMEspamspam_OUTmit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

It's known as "Rosh" in my company as well.  I can't say that I let it
worry me however!

Mike

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2008\01\29@075808 by Gerhard Fiedler

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William "Chops" Westfield wrote:

>> looked more like JER-MAN-EEE
>
> Oh, you mean "Deutschland" ?
>
> I've never quite figured out how there can be that much difference  
> between what a country calls itself and what everyone else calls it.  

Maybe this helps:

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_for_Germany>

Gerhard

2008\01\29@082031 by Rolf

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wouter van ooijen wrote:
>> I've never quite figured out how there can be that much difference  
>> between what a country calls itself and what everyone else
>> calls it.  
>>    
>
> For a start: should we call ourselves "Nederland" or "Holland"? If
> "Nederland" (which is our official name), why blame the rest of the
> world for remembering that it used to be '*de* verenigde nederlanden'
> hence *the* netherlands (or, translated almost literally) "le Pay-Bas"?
>
> As a child I used to be upset because one of our southern provinces is
> called "*North* Brabant" (the souther part is in Flanders), and nobody
> could explain me why there is a "Norwegen" buth no "Southwegen". The
> world is so nicely inconsistent.
>
> Wouter van Ooijen
>
>
>  
While on the off-topic of country names and compass points, let me
enlighten you to some trivia....

South Africa is the only country in the world named after it's
Geographical location.

Then again, there have been a few times in my travels when I have met
geographically challenged (but otherwise very nice) people who wanted to
know what country in South Africa I come from.... ;-)

Rolf

2008\01\29@084058 by Chris Emerson

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On Tue, Jan 29, 2008 at 10:12:15AM +0100, wouter van ooijen wrote:
> and nobody could explain me why there is a "Norwegen" buth no
> "Southwegen". The world is so nicely inconsistent.

Now that you say it, "Southwegen" sounds quite a bit like "Sweden" if
you slur them.  And the geography works...

Chris

2008\01\29@090444 by Rolf

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Chris Emerson wrote:
> On Tue, Jan 29, 2008 at 10:12:15AM +0100, wouter van ooijen wrote:
>  
>> and nobody could explain me why there is a "Norwegen" buth no
>> "Southwegen". The world is so nicely inconsistent.
>>    
>
> Now that you say it, "Southwegen" sounds quite a bit like "Sweden" if
> you slur them.  And the geography works...
>
> Chris
>  
Actually, the Wiki article referenced elsewhere indicates that Old Norsk
(Norwegian) called Germany "South Way"...

see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_for_Germany#List_of_names_divided_into_groups

Then look for Old Norse <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Norse>:
/Suðrvegr/ – literally "south way"

Rolf

2008\01\29@094144 by David VanHorn

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The variant I keep hearing is "ROW Has"

2008\01\29@133943 by Eoin Ross

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face
Or from Ohio/Indiana....   Wash is pronounced Warsh     Often heard is the "hi-th" (not height) of an object.

>>> RemoveMEbbarrspamTakeThisOuTcalifornia.com 28 Jan 08 19:36:45 >>>
On Mon, 28 Jan 2008 17:20:40 -0600, "PAUL James" wrote:
>All,
>
>*** Are there _any_ English words that end in "hs" that make a sh sound?***
>I can't think of any, but along a similar vein, how about "FAVRE"
>pronounced as if it were apelled FARVE.
>As in "Bret Favre" the football player.
>

Maybe he's dyslexic. :=)
Regards, Bob


2008\01\30@043057 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>Or from Ohio/Indiana....   Wash is pronounced Warsh
>Often heard is the "hi-th" (not height) of an object.

Just don't start me on UK place names ... ;))) no wonder the Americans went
their own way with spelling ...

2008\01\30@052632 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> >Or from Ohio/Indiana....   Wash is pronounced Warsh
>>Often heard is the "hi-th" (not height) of an object.
>
> Just don't start me on UK place names ... ;))) no wonder
> the Americans went
> their own way with spelling ...

Cholmondeley.        Chumly
Worcestershire.    Worster
Pall Mall                Pell Mell
The Mall                The Mell
The Sweeney         Scotland Yard :-)


2008\01\30@060301 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Worcestershire.    Worster

Well, more like Wister (to rhyme with whisper)

then
Towcester    Toaster
Gloucester    Gloster
Bicester    Bister

and then, of course, you get into Scottish pronunciations ...

2008\01\31@131014 by James Newton

face picon face
There is an absolutely brilliant program (which happens to be about female
sexual desire) done by the BBC lately, which I've been watching, and
learning a lot from, but the one thing that drives me crazy is trying to
understand what the heck they are saying. Most BBC programs I can understand
quite clearly, e.g. the news and documentaries, but this one has a bunch of
people just chatting and the accent is just at the edge of what I can get.
(email me off list if you can't find it and are interested)

I strongly advocate for languages other than English (e.g. bilingual
education with both English and Spanish teaching) and I am saddened by any
damage western influence does to the use of native languages in other
countries. Diversity is a good thing.

On the other hand, if I had my druthers, I'D LIKE WORDS TO BE PROUNOUNCED
THE WAY THEY ARE SPELLED FOR PITTY SAKE!!! Using the pronunciation rules of
the language they are being used in. Or spelled the way they are pronounced:
Either way, but with consistency please!

So "Wednesday" should be pronounced "Wed" "nes" "day" unless "Odins" was
always pronounced "Odin" by the Norse.

RoHS should be pronounced "Row" "HS" ("HS" is like "Hoss" without the "O")

And "Worcestershire" should be pronounced "Wor" "sester" "shire" (C before
an E is an S).

I do understand that there are a lot of words in the English language that
are based on other languages, and I have no problem with that as long as we
can take the time to learn the other language enough to pronounce it. So:

"Chevrolet" is "Shev" "Row" "Lay" because the "ch" is "sh" in French, the
"o" is long from the "e" and every word ending with an "e" and any other
letter in French is pronounced "ay" apparently. "er", "ez", "es",  = "ay",
http://www.languageguide.org/francais/grammar/pronunciation/ I thought "et"
was also "ay", but I don't see that one.

ANYWAY...

Is "Worcestershire" from a language in which all words with "orchestershire"
in them are to have that replaced with "ister"?

Or is the English tongue just lazy?

And would someone please pass on to the town and to the sauce makers the
request that they either provide the etymology of the word with
pronunciation rules or change the spelling to "Wister"?

Thank you.

;)

--
James.



-----Original Message-----
From: piclist-bouncesEraseMEspam.....mit.edu [EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspammit.edu] On Behalf Of
Alan B. Pearce
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2008 03:03
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
Subject: Re: [EE] Pronouncing RoHS

>Worcestershire.    Worster

Well, more like Wister (to rhyme with whisper)

then
Towcester    Toaster
Gloucester    Gloster
Bicester    Bister

and then, of course, you get into Scottish pronunciations ...

2008\01\31@133711 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesEraseMEspamEraseMEmit.edu [RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamKILLspammit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

Not especially, but the English tongue does have a lot of history behind
it so it's inevitable that over the centuries some words get
"bastardised" and the modified form becomes the norm.

The of course you have regional dialects which can quite dramatically
change the pronunciation of a word. I'm sure you hear this in the US
just as much as we do in the UK.

Regards

Mike

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2008\01\31@134318 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Jan 31, 2008, at 10:11 AM, James Newton wrote:

> I'D LIKE WORDS TO BE PROUNOUNCED THE WAY THEY ARE SPELLED

The follow is apparently "author unknown":

English Is Tough Stuff (Unpredictable Pronunciation)

Dearest creature in creation,
Study English pronunciation.
I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.

Just compare heart, beard, and heard,
Dies and diet, lord and word,
Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
(Mind the latter, how it's written.)
Now I surely will not plague you
With such words as plaque and ague.
But be careful how you speak:
Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;

Cloven, oven, how and low,
Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe.
Hear me say, devoid of trickery,
Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore,
Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles,
Exiles, similes, and reviles;
Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
Solar, mica, war and far;

One, anemone, Balmoral,
Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel;
Gertrude, German, wind and mind,
Scene, Melpomene, mankind.
Billet does not rhyme with ballet,
Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
Blood and flood are not like food,
Nor is mould like should and would.

Viscous, viscount, load and broad,
Toward, to forward, to reward.
And your pronunciation's OK
When you correctly say croquet,
Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
Friend and fiend, alive and live.
Ivy, privy, famous; clamour
And enamour rhyme with hammer.

River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
Doll and roll and some and home.
Stranger does not rhyme with anger,
Neither does devour with clangour.
Souls but foul, haunt but aunt,
Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant,
Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger,
And then singer, ginger, linger,

Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge,
Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age.
Query does not rhyme with very,
Nor does fury sound like bury.
Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth.
Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath.
Though the differences seem little,
We say actual but victual.

Refer does not rhyme with deafer,
Foeffer does, and zephyr, heifer.
Mint, pint, senate and sedate;
Dull, bull, and George ate late.
Scenic, Arabic, Pacific,
Science, conscience, scientific.
Liberty, library, heave and heaven,
Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven.

We say hallowed, but allowed,
People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
Mark the differences, moreover,
Between mover, cover, clover;
Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
Chalice, but police and lice;
Camel, constable, unstable,
Principle, disciple, label.

Petal, panel, and canal,
Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal.
Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair,
Senator, spectator, mayor.
Tour, but our and succour, four.
Gas, alas, and Arkansas.
Sea, idea, Korea, area,
Psalm, Maria, but malaria.

Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean.
Doctrine, turpentine, marine.
Compare alien with Italian,
Dandelion and battalion.
Sally with ally, yea, ye,
Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key.
Say aver, but ever, fever,
Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver.

Heron, granary, canary.
Crevice and device and aerie.
Face, but preface, not efface.
Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass.
Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging.
Ear, but earn and wear and tear
Do not rhyme with here but ere.

Seven is right, but so is even,
Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen,
Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk,
Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.
Pronunciation -- think of Psyche!
Is a paling stout and spikey?
Won't it make you lose your wits,
Writing groats and saying grits?

It's a dark abyss or tunnel:
Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale,
Islington and Isle of Wight,
Housewife, verdict and indict.
Finally, which rhymes with enough --
Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough?
Hiccough has the sound of cup.
My advice is to give up!

2008\01\31@164550 by Gerhard Fiedler

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William "Chops" Westfield wrote:

> On Jan 31, 2008, at 10:11 AM, James Newton wrote:
>
>> I'D LIKE WORDS TO BE PROUNOUNCED THE WAY THEY ARE SPELLED
>
> The follow is apparently "author unknown":
[...]
> My advice is to give up!

Author could be any ESL student... :)

> English Is Tough Stuff (Unpredictable Pronunciation)

It is. You want a language with (almost) clear pronunciation rules, speak
Spanish or Portuguese. There is no such thing as a word that's pronounced
as it is spelled in the English language. There are a few that /seem/ to
be, but that's just to lead you the wrong way with the next word :)

Gerhard

2008\01\31@171831 by David Meiklejohn

face
flavicon
face

> Not especially, but the English tongue does have a lot of history behind
> it so it's inevitable that over the centuries some words get
> "bastardised" and the modified form becomes the norm.
>
> The of course you have regional dialects which can quite dramatically
> change the pronunciation of a word. I'm sure you hear this in the US
> just as much as we do in the UK.

For example, why does "Arkansas" not rhyme with "Kansas"?


- David Meiklejohn

2008\01\31@172727 by David VanHorn

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>
> For example, why does "Arkansas" not rhyme with "Kansas"?
>

"S" is pronounced as a "W" when it follows "Arkansa", of course!

2008\01\31@173514 by Carl Denk

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face
Does anyone want to wrestle with Cuyahoga (the county that Cleveland,
Ohio is in)(It's an American native Indian name), and Elyria (our county
seat in Ohio) named for the Ely family which is pronounced E-Lie, but is
pronounced El-lria.

David Meiklejohn wrote:
{Quote hidden}


'[EE] Pronouncing RoHS'
2008\02\01@083549 by Alan B. Pearce
face picon face
>There is an absolutely brilliant program ...
>... done by the BBC lately, ...
> but this one has a bunch of people just chatting
>and the accent is just at the edge of what I can get.
>(email me off list if you can't find it and are interested)

This sounds like it is people from around Manchester, Liverpool, or Glasgow,
all of which have quite hard to understand accents. Cannot say I am aware of
the program myself, but the BBC does have production centres in those
cities.

2008\02\01@083836 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>For example, why does "Arkansas" not rhyme with "Kansas"?

This is one I use, and also why is "solder" pronounced "Sodder" in the US?

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