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'[EE] Popular general purpose USB MCUs for hobbyist'
2005\12\20@223618 by Chen Xiao Fan

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I know there are some other USB MCUs other than PIC.
For example, Silicon Labs C8051F320/321 seem to be
nice USB MCU (they have US$11 demo board for sale
and the US$29 demo kit for C8051F064 uses this USB
MCU as the programmer/debugger). However the packaging
is not so friendly to hobbyists (LQFP32 and MLP28).

Philips LPC214x seem to be a nice family of USB MCUs.
The package might be a problem (LQFP64).

It is a bit strange that the Atmel USB MCUs are not
so popular judging from Google search results even
though their 8051 and AVR are quite popular.

I am not so familiar with other family of MCUs like
the Cypress PSoc and their USB MCUs but quite some
of them are not really general purpose MCUs.

Regards,
Xiaofan

2005\12\21@043147 by William Chops Westfield

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On Dec 20, 2005, at 7:36 PM, Chen Xiao Fan wrote:

> I am not so familiar with other family of MCUs like
> the Cypress PSoc and their USB MCUs but quite some
> of them are not really general purpose MCUs.
>
I think the cypress parts are pretty "general purpose"; they're
just not very popular for some reason.  IIRC, most of the low-end
parts are OTP and I don't even think they have uv-erasable versions.

Freescale has some apparently little-known flash USB parts in the
68hc908JB8 series (and perhaps elsewhere.  I thought I recalled a
14pin DIP, but the smallest JB8 is 20 pins...)

BillW

2005\12\21@202351 by Mike Singer

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William Chops Westfield wrote:
> I think the cypress parts are pretty "general purpose"; they're
> just not very popular for some reason.  IIRC, most of the low-end
> parts are OTP and I don't even think they have uv-erasable versions.

I'm afraid that's not true.

http://www.cypress.com/portal/server.pt?space=CommunityPage&control=SetCommunity&CommunityID=209&PageID=215&gid=9&fid=13&category=All&showall=false

They have even
Cypress's latest offering, WirelessUSB LP(TM) device combines very low
power, long range (10m+), high data rate (1Mbps-GFSK or 250Kbps-DSSS)
...

I was told that T.J. Rogers uses WirelessUSB for his personal
automated wine-making

Mike.

2005\12\22@172431 by Andre Abelian

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Mike,

I used Cypress mcu PSoC  and I can tell that it is very good chip.
It has programmable analog components built in you can
directly connect audio head to it, Flash based, windows compiler is only
100$.

Andre



Mike Singer wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2005\12\22@204155 by Chen Xiao Fan

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> I used Cypress mcu PSoC  and I can tell that it is very good
> chip.It has programmable analog components built in you can
> directly connect audio head to it, Flash based, windows
> compiler is only 100$.
>
> Andre

Interesting comment. The features seems to be good but
what I heard about PSoc is not that positive (very hard to
program, current consumption and other issues). I have no
experience with it though. And I am not so sure about the
company Cypress either.

The only thing I know is that the IDE is really taking
a lot of resources and very slow to load.

Regards,
Xiaofan

2005\12\23@014709 by William Chops Westfield

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>> I used Cypress mcu PSoC  and I can tell that it is very good

Can the PSoC do USB?

BillW

2005\12\25@004140 by Seitai Chen

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Hi Chen,

   I had the chance to use the Cypress FX2 USB Chip (I used the 68013
chip) and I liked everything about the chip except for its price. I
really think that re-enumeration is a very clever idea and that the chip
itself actually supports Hi-Speed mode (480 Mbps) instead of just Full
Speed (12Mbps) like the PIC USB chips. They actually have a lot of
support for the chip, everything driver to firmware source code in C and
app notes. Overall a nice little enhanced 8051 microcontroller w/ a very
powerful USB hardware engine. The most impressive thing about the FX2
chip was the fact that there was a dedicated programmable FIFO (GPIF)
that had a programmable parallel interface which allows it to
communicate w/ outside parallel devices while bypassing the the slow
microcontroller which was only 12 mips. This greatly improves ability to
stream large quantity of data (to a hard drive etc...).
   The only thing that really bugged me about Cypress was that their C
compiler (Keil, I think...) wasn't free and the trial edition had some
severe size limitation to it, and the fact that the firmware isn't
offered in assembly...

~Terry

2005\12\26@003050 by Shawn Wilton

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Has anyone tried the Silicon Labs USB chips (uControllers)?  They look
pretty decent.


On 12/24/05, Seitai Chen <spam_OUTseitai.chenTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

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