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'[EE] Please please please'
2008\02\08@154836 by Mike Hord

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DO NOT use red/orange/green colors of one LED to send
your user data.

I'm working with a Newport motion controller and the only
user feedback it offers is via RS-232 or one single LED
which varies between red, orange, and green.

Or, as I see it, on, on, and on.

I know we've discussed this before but it bears repeating.

Mike H.

2008\02\08@171500 by Peter Todd

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On Fri, Feb 08, 2008 at 02:48:31PM -0600, Mike Hord wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Color-blindness right?

How about blink-codes?

- --
http://petertodd.org
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2008\02\08@180345 by Jake Anderson

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Peter Todd wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I dislike blink codes.
"Fast blinking = X
slow blinking = Y"

well is that flashing there fast or slow?
perhaps combine both?

2008\02\08@181121 by Steve Howes

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>> How about blink-codes?
>>
> I dislike blink codes.
> "Fast blinking = X
> slow blinking = Y"
>
> well is that flashing there fast or slow?

1 flash for error 1.. 2 flashes for error 2..

2008\02\08@182451 by Mark Rages

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On Feb 8, 2008 5:10 PM, Steve Howes <spam_OUTsteveTakeThisOuTspamgeekinter.net> wrote:
> >> How about blink-codes?
> >>
> > I dislike blink codes.
> > "Fast blinking = X
> > slow blinking = Y"
> >
> > well is that flashing there fast or slow?
>
> 1 flash for error 1.. 2 flashes for error 2..
>

Oh, please don't start the Morse code thread again...

Regards,
Mark
markrages@gmail
--
Mark Rages, Engineer
Midwest Telecine LLC
.....markragesKILLspamspam@spam@midwesttelecine.com

2008\02\08@184127 by Mike W

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The 'bell signaling' system used in the Cornish tin mines worked very well for
over 30 different underground signals.. Why not incorporate a piezo and use a
similar system. Even mobile phones use Morse.. SMS in Morse code when you
receive a message. No need to keep looking at the equipment for when it wants
to warn / inform you.

On 8 Feb 2008 at 23:10, Steve Howes wrote:

> >> How about blink-codes?
> >>
> > I dislike blink codes.
> > "Fast blinking = X
> > slow blinking = Y"
> >
> > well is that flashing there fast or slow?
>
> 1 flash for error 1.. 2 flashes for error 2..
>
> --

2008\02\08@184141 by Steve Howes

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>>
> Oh, please don't start the Morse code thread again

Oh you love it really ;)

2008\02\08@185355 by Mike Hord

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As long as it can be disabled or changed to visible only, sure.

Blink codes are actually REALLY nice, as they offer much
more potential for information.  Assuming that the average
person can track, say, 3 digits of up to four choices each
(i.e., one blink to four blinks, with along off period marking
"digits" and a long off period marking "words"), you give
yourself 3^4 possible error codes- 81 opportunities to tell
the user how they screwed up.

Just be aware that, if you make something with an RGO LED
and try and encode information that way, fully 15% of the European
descended males who work with your product will be confused,
disheartened, and very, very peeved with you.

Mike H.

On Feb 8, 2008 5:39 PM, Mike W <mikespamKILLspampencoys.org.uk> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\02\08@193104 by Bob Blick

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--- Mike Hord <.....mike.hordKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:
> Just be aware that, if you make something with an
> RGO LED
> and try and encode information that way, fully 15%
> of the European
> descended males who work with your product will be
> confused,
> disheartened, and very, very peeved with you.

I use Octarine colored LEDs to send signals, it
ensures the tech is qualified.

Cheerful regards,

Bob

2008\02\08@193613 by Enki

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       Beethoven and Morse code:

       http://www.zerobeat.net/morse505.html


On 8 Feb 2008 at 23:39, Mike W wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2008\02\08@194721 by David VanHorn

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> I use Octarine colored LEDs to send signals, it
> ensures the tech is qualified.
>

Hmm.. This may be the secret female code.
Colored signals in Taupe, Mauve, Chambray... Men, seeing only RED,
GREEN, BLUE, YELLOW, will never figure it out.

2008\02\08@195056 by David VanHorn

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A symbol set of N elements, wide and narrow, would work.
One of the things that makes regular morse hard to learn is the variable length.

Hell, that's how I send debug information from my devices, My "pong"
routine outputs 8 pulses, wide for 1 and narrow for 0. The total width
of any byte sent is always the same though, allowing me to stack up 50
bytes if I have to, and still read it with my scope's trigger offset.

2008\02\08@195328 by David VanHorn

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> I use Octarine colored LEDs to send signals, it
> ensures the tech is qualified.

The secret decoder ring
http://chir.ag/phernalia/name-that-color/

2008\02\08@224706 by Cedric Chang

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I went to the SDR and I found no Octarine coloring.
Cedric


On Feb 8, 2008, at 5:53 PM, David VanHorn wrote:

> I use Octarine colored LEDs to send signals, it
> ensures the tech is qualified.

The secret decoder ring
http://chir.ag/phernalia/name-that-color/

2008\02\08@231005 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 10:46 PM 2/8/2008, you wrote:
>I went to the SDR and I found no Octarine coloring.
>Cedric

I think Ocatrine lies outside the gamut of your monitor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octarine#Octarine

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
EraseMEspeffspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com



2008\02\08@231520 by Bob Blick

face picon face
Octarine:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octarine#Octarine

and its position in the electromagnetic spectrum:
http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/electromagnetic_spectrum.png

Cheerful regards,

Bob


Cedric Chang wrote:
> I went to the SDR and I found no Octarine coloring.
> Cedric
>
>> I use Octarine colored LEDs to send signals, it
>> ensures the tech is qualified.

2008\02\09@003205 by Apptech

face
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> Octarine:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octarine#Octarine
>
> and its position in the electromagnetic spectrum:
> http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/electromagnetic_spectrum.png

They have missed out the very important range "Scientific
Light" such as that that comes out of "Light Sources" such
as  the "Diamond light Source". This extends over the range
of frequencies of roughly, in their nomenclature,
Entertaining- to Exa, although one would not be at all
surprised (but not for long at all) to find Zappa- frequency
rays coming out of a Scientific Light source. Using more
mundane descriptors that's about soft XRays through medium
hard Gamma Rays with a possibility of extension well into
"Sinister Google Projects".

Light ain't what it used to be. Especially if you are
"selling" a scientific "light source" to the public.



           Russell

2008\02\09@192316 by Nate Duehr

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On Feb 8, 2008, at 4:53 PM, Mike Hord wrote:

> As long as it can be disabled or changed to visible only, sure.
>
> Blink codes are actually REALLY nice, as they offer much
> more potential for information.  Assuming that the average
> person can track, say, 3 digits of up to four choices each
> (i.e., one blink to four blinks, with along off period marking
> "digits" and a long off period marking "words"), you give
> yourself 3^4 possible error codes- 81 opportunities to tell
> the user how they screwed up.


Yeah and then you get the idiot engineer who designed the control  
board for my Carrier furnace.

EVERY safety-related sensor is tied to the SAME Blink code.  "31".

No information that's useful for troubleshooting/replacing sensors  
that have failed at all.

Blink codes can't fix retarded design... unfortunately.

--
Nate Duehr
natespamspam_OUTnatetech.com



2008\02\09@194150 by Marcel Duchamp

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Nate Duehr wrote:
>
>
> Yeah and then you get the idiot engineer who designed the control  
> board for my Carrier furnace.

Why do you blame the engineer for doing his/her job? That engineer
didn't think that one up; marketing did.


2008\02\09@201414 by Nate Duehr

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On Feb 9, 2008, at 5:40 PM, Marcel Duchamp wrote:

> Nate Duehr wrote:
>>
>>
>> Yeah and then you get the idiot engineer who designed the control
>> board for my Carrier furnace.
>
> Why do you blame the engineer for doing his/her job? That engineer
> didn't think that one up; marketing did.


Marketing had control of the 20 or so codes that the control board can  
flash when it's in trouble?

I seriously doubt it.

The design flaw is that the control board has about 20 failure codes  
that can be flashed, but ALL of the different sensors that can stop  
the firing of the furnace (flue pressure switch, flame and flame  
escape sensors, etc) ALL cause the control board to flash ONE code...  
"31".

So if you get a code 31 from a Carrier furnace, all you know is that  
ONE of the MANY sensors tripped it.

It would have been VERY VERY VERY easy to design it such that it would  
flash separate code numbers for each sensor... or if they had to, "31"  
and then another number for the sensor number.

The design sucks.  Ask any furnace technician.

The troubleshooting steps for a code "31" are to test EVERY SINGLE  
SENSOR manually.   And here's a microprocessor driven board sitting  
right there flashing it's dumb message the whole time.  It's not  
effectively any better than a single "warning" light.

Most of the other cause codes are things that simply won't happen in  
the real world very often, but the cause codes will be "nice to have"  
if they do.  But to have the furnace controller monitor a number of  
sensors and then not tell you WHICH sensor tripped it off-line, is  
just dumb.

And no way is that a Marketing decision.  LEGAL decision, maybe I  
could see... if they don't want unqualified non-technicians working on  
the furnace, they might have been trying to purposely obscure the  
faults.  But why bother having codes for 20 others, and not the common  
sensors if that's the case.

Nope -- easier to attribute it to stupidity than malice.  It's just a  
dumb design.

--
Nate Duehr
@spam@nateKILLspamspamnatetech.com



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