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'[EE] Old scope, new scope, stand alone, pc-based s'
2008\05\07@193519 by piclist

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So I am trying to pack my car for a cross-country move to Berkeley, CA.  

Every square inch I can spare will make this easier, so I am pondering my
big 1009mhz 5 channel scope.  I love it, but it is taking up a lot of
space, and I don't trust UPS to deliver it.  Plus it will cost more to
ship than I paid for the thing.

I was pondering leaving it, and buying a PC-based one once I was settled
in, thinking they would be cheaper.. but I see prices around $400 or so
for the low level stuff and thats way too much.

So... is there a nice $100 pc-based scope, or think I can replace mine for
about that price in Berkeley?  Or should I bring it?  I hate the idea of
buying something I own, even if it IS cheaper than trying to move it.

I wish I could just ship my entire hobby out there, but too much of it is
delicate and easily breakable and I have had too many packages trashed by
UPS, not to mention movers.  (Last time I used movers they lost my bicycle
and completeley smashed this REALLY nice autotransformer.)

Ugh.  Having a good collection of parts and tools is great until you have
to move it long distances in a small car.

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\05\07@194924 by peter green

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> I wish I could just ship my entire hobby out there, but too much of it is
> delicate and easily breakable and I have had too many packages trashed by
> UPS, not to mention movers.  (Last time I used movers they lost my bicycle
> and completeley smashed this REALLY nice autotransformer.)
>
>  
Have you considered just renting a van?

2008\05\07@195120 by David Braley

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spam_OUTpiclistTakeThisOuTspamian.org wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I would never leave my gear behind. Rent a truck with a car dolly and
move it all in one load.

You may stay there, in which case you'll be glad you did.

David

2008\05\07@203540 by Marc Nicholas

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Its really a 1Ghz scope? I'd take it!

-marc



On 5/7/08, .....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@ian.org <piclistspamKILLspamian.org> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\05\07@210054 by Marcel

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No, it is *NOT* a 1GHz scope... he said it was a 1.009GHz scope.

Sheesh!

Marc Nicholas wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\05\07@220136 by piclist

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On Wed, 7 May 2008, Marcel wrote:
> No, it is *NOT* a 1GHz scope... he said it was a 1.009GHz scope.
>
> Sheesh!
>
> Marc Nicholas wrote:
> > Its really a 1Ghz scope? I'd take it!

Typo. :-) 100mhz.

My car has no trailer hitch and the manual says not to put one on.

Car inside a truck.. why thats an interesting idea there.  I did rent a
truck for the first part of the move and towed my car.  8 hour drive, and
easy since it was all on a highway.  I don't think I would want to do that
for a move across country... getting stuck in some small gas station
would be unhappy and I like my car.  It's comfy.

Just the gas alone in using a truck would had quite a bit... maybe
throwing more stuff in boxes and rolling the dice with UPS is the way
to go.

I am mailing stuff I think is safe to mail, but that still leaves quite a
large amount to fit in my trunk.

Thanks for the suggestions.

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\05\07@223053 by Apptech

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> My car has no trailer hitch and the manual says not to put
> one on.

And ?

> Car inside a truck.. why thats an interesting idea there.
> I did rent a
> truck for the first part of the move and towed my car.  8
> hour drive, and
> easy since it was all on a highway.  I don't think I would
> want to do that
> for a move across country... getting stuck in some small
> gas station
> would be unhappy and I like my car.  It's comfy.

Roof rack.
Roofbox.
... ?

I'd almost certainly fit a trailer hitch if I was in in your
situation.
As long as insurance does not disallow it it is extremely
unlikely to be a terrible idea.




       R


2008\05\07@223910 by Herbert Graf

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On Thu, 2008-05-08 at 14:30 +1200, Apptech wrote:
> > My car has no trailer hitch and the manual says not to put
> > one on.
>
> And ?
>
> Roof rack.
> Roofbox.
> ... ?
>
> I'd almost certainly fit a trailer hitch if I was in in your
> situation.
> As long as insurance does not disallow it it is extremely
> unlikely to be a terrible idea.

Unfortunately most of North America has an incorrect opinion on
trailers. Most of us think that to tow ANYTHING you need a big truck
with a V8 engine.

Fact is pretty much ANY car is capable of towing 1000-1500lbs. While
most cars do have a tow rating in the manual, most dealerships will
claim it's not a good idea. That's rubbish.

In Europe OTOH towing a trailer is common. I've seen VW Golfs with tow
hitches. Yes, you can't tow a 5th wheel trailer with a Gold (safely) but
a small trailer is no problem.

TTYL

2008\05\07@231606 by piclist

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Moving is a pain!

I found some trailer hitches for my car at about $150.  But the issue I
have now is looking at the recomendations for speed of the trailers, most
say no more than 45mph.

I put a bit of weight behind that, as I have seen many trailers bouncing
about and weaving back and forth behind cars moving at high speed. And
once I even saw one get so out of control it came loose and smashed
through a guard rail and down a steep hill.  Oops!

So far the plan is ship as much as I can via UPS/USPS and insure the heck
out of it.

I need a hobby that requires less parts.  Like Yoga or something. :-)

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\05\07@233645 by Jake Anderson

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piclist@ian.org wrote:
> Moving is a pain!
>
> I found some trailer hitches for my car at about $150.  But the issue I
> have now is looking at the recomendations for speed of the trailers, most
> say no more than 45mph.
>
> I put a bit of weight behind that, as I have seen many trailers bouncing
> about and weaving back and forth behind cars moving at high speed. And
> once I even saw one get so out of control it came loose and smashed
> through a guard rail and down a steep hill.  Oops!
>
> So far the plan is ship as much as I can via UPS/USPS and insure the heck
> out of it.
>
> I need a hobby that requires less parts.  Like Yoga or something. :-)
>
> --
> Ian Smith
> http://www.ian.org
>  
Any decent trailer with a sane driver shouldn't have tracking problems
like that.
You have a trailer, it means take it easy, you aren't going to stop on a
"dime" and you have to leave a safe following distance to take that into
account.

2008\05\08@013151 by Apptech

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RVKI - see "Long ago ... "

> I found some trailer hitches for my car at about $150.
> But the issue I
> have now is looking at the recomendations for speed of the
> trailers, most
> say no more than 45mph.
>
> I put a bit of weight behind that, as I have seen many
> trailers bouncing
> about and weaving back and forth behind cars moving at
> high speed. And
> once I even saw one get so out of control it came loose
> and smashed
> through a guard rail and down a steep hill.  Oops!

What Jake says BUT if you ever do get bad trailer weaving
then ACCELERATING seems to help :-).
(If you are trying to brake at the time this may not be an
option :-). )
Testing the stability and playing with load distribution may
help.

45 mph may slow you down somewhat BUT on a long trip its
amazing how much more you can see at a very slow speed. As
this is a once only occasion for you it may be a worthwhile
experience going slow.

Long ago we almost ripped the front subframe out of a
Cortina by bashing it on a rock ledge while descending Mt
Tarawera - a story in its own right. Frame hung in there by
the tips of the bush holders. Acted like a grader on gravel
roads. The local AA man said he had to advise us to get it
repaired where we were. But then he added soto voce, 'if it
was mine I'd drive it back,     but slowly'. Which is what
we did. Under ?200? miles but at 30 mph the whole way.
Summer. Windows open, laid back, rolling picnic. With our
children. We deemed that it was safe enough at that speed
that if the subframe actually fell out it would only be
'exciting'. My wife is not a vast risk taker and she was
happy. The trip was an amazing experience as we saw so very
much more than usual and felt a part of the local scene as
we travelled through. After a while 30 mph feels almost like
walking. Well worth doing, once anyway. TransAm at 45 mph
may be 'a little slow' but if you make it an event in its
own right it could be worthwhile.


       Russell


2008\05\08@083954 by Carl Denk

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Trailers only weave when the are loaded improperly. They must be loaded
front heavy, with say for a light trailer (including load) 20 lbs. to
over 100 lbs for heavy trailers for actual weight on the hitch ball. I
pulled a Nissan Pathfinder (4000 lbs.) on a U-haul tandem axle car
hauler (2000 lbs.) from Atlanta, Ga. to Cleveland, Ohio (624 miles) in
12 hours with a 1996 Ford Bronco SUV(6000 lbs.) . We went one exit on
I-285, trailer start weaving badly, almost lost it. Stopped in a quiet
parking lot, turned the Pathfinder around end for end to get more weight
forward. Trailed just fine all the way home, including last 150 miles in
heavy snow with very slippery roads and white outs. Of course the Bronco
was in 4 wheel drive with locking differentials front and rear. The
front axle drives about 2% faster than the rear axle which helps
straight line stability greatly. But try and turn sharp at low speeds
and she still likes to go straight. The trailer had hydraulic brakes
with the master cylinder part of the hitch. When the towing vehicle
slows, the master cylinder piston is pushed, applying the trailer
brakes. It was well calibrated for the application, and never had
braking issues.

piclistspamspam_OUTian.org wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\05\08@085629 by Carl Denk

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There are also drive away companies that handle getting vehicles from
one part of the country to another by driving. You can pay to have your
vehicle driven or get the use (not sure which way the money goes) of a
vehicle cheap to travel one way. Also there are custom (no only fancy
but any car to some location) car haulers that can be hired to get your
vehicle to a location for a fee. 9/11 my Ford Bronco was on a car hauler
(portable parking lot) between Calgary and Vancouver, Canada, while we
made to distance on a fancy train. Cost $250 US for the 600 miles the
driver drove. The truck normally hauls rental cars to where they are
needed, and had a mint vintage Corvette besides our Bronco.

@spam@piclistKILLspamspamian.org wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\05\12@122009 by Clint Sharp

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In message <1210214331.17200.77.camel@E2140>, Herbert Graf
<KILLspammailinglist4KILLspamspamfarcite.net> writes
>In Europe OTOH towing a trailer is common. I've seen VW Golfs with tow
>hitches. Yes, you can't tow a 5th wheel trailer with a Gold (safely) but
>a small trailer is no problem.
Heh, I've seen smaller cars than a Golf fitted with towbars. You can buy
them for cars that you wouldn't think were capable of towing (Fiat
Barchetta!).

http://www.witter-towbars.co.uk/

As far as the OP, buy a spanky new digital scope.  Keep the old 'scope
as well, you can never have too many toys.
>
>TTYL

--
Clint Sharp

2008\05\12@225029 by Dwayne Reid

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At 08:38 PM 5/7/2008, Herbert Graf wrote:

>Unfortunately most of North America has an incorrect opinion on
>trailers. Most of us think that to tow ANYTHING you need a big truck
>with a V8 engine.
>
>Fact is pretty much ANY car is capable of towing 1000-1500lbs. While
>most cars do have a tow rating in the manual, most dealerships will
>claim it's not a good idea. That's rubbish.

I'm driving a 2005 Pontiac Sunfire.  Both my car owner's manual and
the dealership say that while the automatic transmission version of
that vehicle is OK for trailer towing, the manual transmission
version is NOT suitable for towing.  I truly wish I had known that
before I purchased the car - I wouldn't have.

I'm assuming that the wussy little tiny clutch is the weak link in
the chain.  I simply plan to install one of the new ceramic-type
clutch assemblies if and when I really do have to install a trailer
hitch.  As it stands, this is the first vehicle I've owned where I
haven't installed a hitch.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <RemoveMEdwaynerTakeThisOuTspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax
http://www.trinity-electronics.com
Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing

2008\05\13@012547 by Apptech

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>>Fact is pretty much ANY car is capable of towing
>>1000-1500lbs. While
>>most cars do have a tow rating in the manual, most
>>dealerships will
>>claim it's not a good idea. That's rubbish.

> I'm driving a 2005 Pontiac Sunfire.  Both my car owner's
> manual and
> the dealership say that while the automatic transmission
> version of
> that vehicle is OK for trailer towing, the manual
> transmission
> version is NOT suitable for towing.  I truly wish I had
> known that
> before I purchased the car - I wouldn't have.

There is about zero chance of their claim being realistic.
While getting a load "off the line" may require a bit of
care, once rolling the clutch should not be overly more than
normally stressed by a sensible trailer load. I've towed all
sorts of loads with all sorts of cars over many years and
have had no more problems than common sense would have lead
me to expect. eg I did manage to do some damage to a clutch
once while trying to back a trailer loaded with gravel from
a more or less standing start over an existing gravel heap,
but it would have been a medium miracle not to have.

Long ago I towed a medium sized caravan (maybe not
substantial by US standards) on a 2 week holiday using a
1600 CC car (Ford Mk2 Cortina manual). No problems at all.
Slower on hills than without a caravan :-).

At a quick look the Pontiac Sunfire is far more capable than
the Ford Mk2 Cortina mentioned above. Unless it's US
practice to install clutches markedly inferior to thos used
in rather small cars 30 or so years ago you should be OK if
using common sense.

Another issue with some cars is body stretch, but as in your
case its a manual/auto issue that shouldn't apply there.



       Russell








{Quote hidden}

> --

2008\05\13@015445 by KPL

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>  Heh, I've seen smaller cars than a Golf fitted with towbars. You can buy
>  them for cars that you wouldn't think were capable of towing (Fiat
>  Barchetta!).
>
>  http://www.witter-towbars.co.uk/

Towing a trailer does not mean it must be big and heavy.
If it's just a small trailer with a boat or motorcycle, it's not a
problem for a small car. That's what those trailer hitches are for.

BTW, is this another British english vs US english difference or what?
I mean - "towbar" vs "hitch".

--
KPL

2008\05\13@082554 by Carl Denk

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Hitch is the portion that attaches to the towing vehicle, usually
includes a square tube receiver and a ball and tube assembly that the
trailer hooks to. The hitch usually is permanently fastened to the
towing vehicle, but for some vehicles (older) temporary rentals are
available..

Tow bar generally is the assembly that attaches to the front of a
vehicle, to allow it to be towed. Commonly used with RV's ((Caravan for
the U.K.) to tow a small vehicle for transportation at destination.

Trailers normally have a tongue with a device to engage the hitch ball
which can be a single tube or 2 or more steel members.

KPL wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\05\13@084328 by Carl Denk

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The stock manual clutch should be able to handle full torque without
slipping and causing heat. But the manual could overheat as gears do
generate heat. Just feel the gearbox on a larger mower after mowing an
acre. Automatic transmissions need to be watched for overheating, which
may not be evident while driving. The tranny dipstick should be pulled
and the oil examined for discoloration and burnt smell. If any question
the tranny fluid and filter should be changed, and the oil pan examined
for debris. Even heavier vehicles need some beefing up when trailer
towing. Our Ford Bronco is rated for 6000 lb. trailer, and can easily
pull that at over 70mph over any Interstate mountain highway, the slow,
smooth shifts for comfort on normal driving allow the automatic's
clutches to slip, creating heat and eventual failure. Replacing an
inexpensive easy to do, pressure regulating part stiffens and makes
quick shifts, not as comfortable, especially in cold weather, but lasts
forever.

Dwayne Reid wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\05\13@085308 by Apptech

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Towbar here (NZ) is the bolted or welded rear towing
attachment on the pulling vehicle. Subject to extensive
regulatory requirements (FEA design et al) and must be
professionally fitted and certified. A temporary
bolt/strap/stick on arrangement would never be sanctioned.
Safety chain mandatory.

'Hitch(hike)' is to stand by the roadside and cadge a ride.


       Russell

{Quote hidden}

2008\05\13@114937 by Clint Sharp

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In message
<TakeThisOuTa9b5b0d20805122254v7b7503b9ha4346614edc0b9a4EraseMEspamspam_OUTmail.gmail.com>, KPL
<RemoveMEkpl.listesspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> writes
>>  Heh, I've seen smaller cars than a Golf fitted with towbars. You can buy
>>  them for cars that you wouldn't think were capable of towing (Fiat
>>  Barchetta!).
>>
>>  http://www.witter-towbars.co.uk/
>
>Towing a trailer does not mean it must be big and heavy.
Of course. There are just some cars you wouldn't expect to have a
towbar, Fiat Barchetta being one.
>If it's just a small trailer with a boat or motorcycle, it's not a
>problem for a small car. That's what those trailer hitches are for.
Tow load being dependant on vehicle weight, of course. It would seem
that there is a mobile home for all sizes of cars too.
>
>BTW, is this another British english vs US english difference or what?
>I mean - "towbar" vs "hitch".
Yes AFAIK, although friends who tow say 'hitch up' when they are
attaching their trailer or caravan. Possibly tow hitch is used in the
UK, I just haven't heard it.
>
>--
>KPL

--
Clint Sharp

2008\05\13@150636 by Martin

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Merely installing anything resembling a tow bar on my hybrid Honda Civic
will void the CVT warranty.
-
Martin


Dwayne Reid wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\05\13@163725 by PicDude

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As someone who has moved a lot in the past decade or so, I can empathize.  And
I know how it hurts to pay for something you already own.  I have enough
personal horror stories about movers not to go that route.

However, if I had to do this, I'd make space in the car for the scope, then
ship clothes by UPS or USPS.  BTW, USPS ships books and other media at a very
low cost as "media mail", and you're allowed to pad that (with clothes etc)
to protect the books/media.  ;)

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Wednesday 07 May 2008 18:35, piclistEraseMEspam.....ian.org wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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