Searching \ for '[EE] OLPC shipping date moved' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=olpc+shipping+date
Search entire site for: 'OLPC shipping date moved'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE] OLPC shipping date moved'
2006\11\08@073015 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
The OLPC (One Laptop per Child) organisation has just announced a
change in the delivery date for the first shipment of its
intended-to-be-world-changing $US100 laptop computers. Changes of
shipping date for a new (let alone a first) model are no great
surprise in the computer industry where projected shipping date are
always changing - but this date was moved from 2Q2007 to - NOW! -
albeit in extremely limited quantities.

That any at all are being shipped is significant as it almost
transforms the product from vapourware to reality. Hopefully.


   http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/NL/704B43685F54E8CBCC25721F00351B05


OLPC is an initiative aimed at putting $US100 (no typo) laptops in the
hands of educators in "3rd world" countries worldwide

At last.

Innovative high resolution low low power LCD.
Target 4 Watt system power running.
Inbuilt 802.11b/g extended range low speed (2 Mbps) wireless mesh
networking to allow distributed access to internet.
Unit can relay radio messages with main cpu off.
Fedora core.
512 kB Flash , 128 MB RAM, ...
VGA colour camera (640x480, 30 Hz)
Optional hand/foot cranked add on power generators.

MUCH more detail in Wikipedia article.

First "shipment" is a meagre 50 units as an introduction with 1000 to
follow in January.
Introductory price is $US146/unit (you may have to buy in multiples of
100,000 and be a government to get this deal).

Target is 1.5 million units and $US100 price by 2008

Excellent overview here

       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Laptop_per_Child

Notional orders:

   Nigeria        1 million
   Libya            1.2 million plus satellite internet and server
per school
   Massachusets
   Maine
   Thailand
   Egypt
   NOT India.





_______________________________

Home

       http://www.laptop.org/

Own Wiki

       http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Home

More

       http://wiki.laptop.org/go/One_Laptop_per_Child


2006\11\08@132907 by Shawn Wilton

picon face
Yeah, from what I recall reading, Thailand dropped out and no longer wishes
to purchase those laptops.  Are laptops REALLY what 3rd world children
need?  How about decent food/shelter/medicine/education...  $100 in a 3rd
world country goes a long ways.


On 11/8/06, Russell McMahon <spam_OUTapptechTakeThisOuTspamparadise.net.nz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\11\08@134351 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On 11/8/06, Shawn Wilton <.....black9KILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:
> Yeah, from what I recall reading, Thailand dropped out and no longer wishes
> to purchase those laptops.  Are laptops REALLY what 3rd world children
> need?  How about decent food/shelter/medicine/education...  $100 in a 3rd
> world country goes a long ways.

The OLPC project is targeting the education part of it.

I think it's a great idea, and I wish I could buy one of these laptops. :(

Alex

2006\11\08@142411 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Russell McMahon wrote:

> Excellent overview here
>
>         http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Laptop_per_Child

How they want to curb the black market that surely will develop (since they
are not selling to the general public):

"But then the third one, which I'm doing and I like is to make this machine
so distinctive that it is socially a stigma to be carrying one if you are
not a child or a teacher. Now you can obviously take it down to your
basement, but I hope your spouse will even say: "Oh God! Honey! What did
you do?" OK? you stole from the church. It's like a red cross on something.
So I'm hoping that the distinctiveness of the product will be the third one
that maybe isn't thought of that often."

I don't know many of the target countries, but I'm reasonably sure that
this won't work very well. Laws are broken without any feeling of
wrongdoing for much less than a small laptop computer if the need is big
enough. Possibly not in the USA or the EU, but probably in much of the
poorer rest of the world.

I can already see people present their new shiny green mini laptop to their
neighbors -- which they got from a kid that was begging for money at the
traffic light... and Brazil is not one of the really poor countries.

Gerhard

2006\11\09@040832 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Shawn Wilton wrote:

> Are laptops REALLY what 3rd world children need?  How about decent
> food/shelter/medicine/education...  

I think while there is a point to this, it is too broad a brush. Not every
child in a 3rd world country is starving, drinks bad water, has worms and
can't read. There are many places where these computers probably can be
very useful.

However, I don't think that the required "one laptop per child" policy over
a whole country makes sense in most places. Usually a country is too
diverse for this to make sense -- unless a country is small or already well
developed, there will be places where other needs are more urgent. This
seems to be the main reason why India doesn't participate. They probably
would buy some if they could get some... but one for /each/ child?

Gerhard

2006\11\09@044359 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Nov 9, 2006, at 1:08 AM, Gerhard Fiedler wrote:

> I don't think that the required "one laptop per child" policy over
> a whole country makes sense in most places. Usually a country is too
> diverse for this to make sense -- unless a country is small or already
> well
> developed, there will be places where other needs are more urgent.

Hey!  You said something I think I entirely agree with.

I think $100 is a lot of money for the intended market.  Didn't someone
get the Nobel peace prize in 2006 for establishing principles of "micro
credit" that allow highly liberating loans that are for about that much?
That's almost a demonstration that having $100 is better than having a
$100 laptop...

BillW

2006\11\09@045321 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>I can already see people present their new shiny green mini laptop
>to their neighbors -- which they got from a kid that was begging
>for money at the traffic light... and Brazil is not one of the
>really poor countries.

and then the laptop gets passed to a terrorist organisation for us in
communication within a cell and to the higher ups and ....

Oh, hang on, there is ITARS to stop that, isn't there ...

2006\11\09@051031 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
I think by that money they could improve their agriculture instead and the
school system so that they will not attack well developed countries by
misunderstanding its culture and the way of thinking completely. I do not
think if just accessing to the internet help them to understand us as it did
not help to the Arabic countries at all -- they still hate the western
civilization.

Tamas


On 09/11/06, William Chops Westfield <westfwspamKILLspammac.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\11\09@064804 by Victor Fraenckel

flavicon
face
How many children in India could have been helped with the BILLIONS that
the world's largest democracy pi**ed away building a nuclear weapon?
Each Indian child could have had a top-of-the-line laptop with all the
bells and whistles for that kind of money!

Just my 2 cents

Vic

*____________________________________________________________________________________________*

*Victor Fraenckel
KC2GUI
victorf ATSIGN windreader DOT com**
*


2006\11\09@071831 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
Victor Fraenckel wrote:
> How many children in India could have been helped with the BILLIONS that
> the world's largest democracy pi**ed away building a nuclear weapon?

India itself could have paid for it, had it not spend ITS billions on
its own nuclear arsenal.

--Bob
{Quote hidden}

2006\11\09@100048 by James Nick Sears

flavicon
face
$2000 is a lot of money here, but if laptops cost $40k, someone  
releasing the first one that cost $2,000 would open things up  
considerably, even if "one laptop per child" is a bit pie in the sky  
(we're a long way from achieving that here, even if the $100 laptop  
takes off).

And remember, this is a tool, not a just a platform for gaming or  
entertainment.  Over time, the value of the education that the laptop  
helps facilitate could help make huge steps in bridging the economic  
gap between the societies.  Maybe, just maybe, over time a few of  
them will learn to build PIC programmers, order a few free samples  
and hack some junk electronics, learn to program and give all of us a  
little fair competition.

To say essentially that it's only valid or useful for the super-super-
wealthy of these societies to have computers until EVERYONE can avoid  
one is a bit like the idea that we shouldn't do any public projects,  
stadiums, or have any private wealth until every last one of our poor  
and homeless are cared for.  Maybe well-intended, but clearly counter-
productive.  If we were still waiting for that to happen, we would  
have more poor and homeless, not less.  The projected reach of the  
project is probably overly optimistic in the short term, but in the  
long run I would expect it to be quite impactful.

-n.


{Quote hidden}

> --

2006\11\09@100315 by James Nick Sears
flavicon
face
help != make them like us

-n.


On Nov 9, 2006, at 5:10 AM, Tamas Rudnai wrote:

>  it did
> not help to the Arabic countries at all -- they still hate the western
> civilization.
>
> Tamas

2006\11\09@102604 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
James Nick Sears wrote:

> $2000 is a lot of money here, but if laptops cost $40k, someone  
> releasing the first one that cost $2,000 would open things up  
> considerably,

But the point is: nobody gets them, unless a whole country subscribes to
the "one per child" program. If people in the US only could get those $2k
laptops you're talking about after the US government subscribed to a "one
per child" program, almost nobody would have one for the foreseeable
future.

The equipment in itself is a pretty good feat, IMO, but the policy is a bit
problematic. And I didn't even start talking about distortions in families
where six year old children make more money begging than their parents
could ever hope earning through honest work. How do you fit a "one laptop
per /child/" (not adult person!) into that?

Gerhard

2006\11\09@105813 by Mohit M. (Lists)

picon face
Maybe there wouldn't be global warming had the US spent its trillions
developing efficient cars than creating a stockpile enough to blow the
world a few times over.

Maybe India wouldn't have had to develop these weapons if the US (and
others) hadn't introduced them to the world first.

Maybe India wouldn't have done it if the world had ensured neighbours
around it weren't.

Maybe India's nuclear weapons are like the USA's Iraq campaign - 'its
part of making the world a safer place'.

Anyway, this discussion is a moot point and also OT.

To bring a slight [EE] touch back to it...
- http://www.amidasimputer.com/

Its not an answer to OLPC. Also comes nowhere near in specs or price.
But the intention was there.

Regards,
- Mohit (from India).
PS: Neither am I a big fan of weapons (nuclear or otherwise) nor am I
intending to be defending my country but there may be some reasons for
those weapons here in India.

{Original Message removed}

2006\11\09@111213 by James Nick Sears

flavicon
face

> Maybe there wouldn't be global warming had the US spent its trillions
> developing efficient cars than creating a stockpile enough to blow the
> world a few times over.
>
> Maybe India wouldn't have had to develop these weapons if the US (and
> others) hadn't introduced them to the world first.
>
> Maybe India wouldn't have done it if the world had ensured neighbours
> around it weren't.

If my aunt had balls, she'd be my uncle.

-n.

2006\11\09@112019 by Shawn Wilton

picon face
Try to remember those weapons were developed in an ERA when
Communism/Dictatorship threatened Democracy.

What India chooses to spend it's money on has little to do with the USA.  I
mean who would want to invade India?  ;-)  Although I do like the chicken
and I've always enjoyed our University's "India Night".  :-P

But it's always easier to blame the US.  Everyone does it.


On 11/9/06, Mohit M. (Lists) <.....mohit.listsKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2006\11\09@112912 by Mohit M. (Lists)

picon face
> If my aunt had balls, she'd be my uncle.
That is definitely OT. You should carry this discussion there.
Although not many of us could comment on it.

Mohit.


{Original Message removed}

2006\11\09@115605 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I mean who would want to invade India?

Maybe you can't imagine any such country, but I am sure they think a lot
about China and Pakistan. And invading is not the only option.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\11\09@120444 by James Nick Sears

flavicon
face
It's true of your aunt as well.

Nothing personal but facts are facts.

On Nov 9, 2006, at 11:28 AM, Mohit M. (Lists) wrote:

>> If my aunt had balls, she'd be my uncle.
> That is definitely OT. You should carry this discussion there.
> Although not many of us could comment on it.
>
> Mohit.
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2006\11\09@120743 by Shawn Wilton

picon face
It was a rhetorical comment meant to discredit his comment that the US is to
blame for everything.  We're not and I resent any remark to the contrary.

Kind regards,

Shawn - US Citizen.  I may not like my government, but I love my country.


On 11/9/06, Wouter van Ooijen <EraseMEwouterspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTvoti.nl> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\11\09@122216 by Mohit M. (Lists)

picon face
> Try to remember those weapons were developed in an ERA when
> Communism/Dictatorship threatened Democracy.
Please also try to remember that in 1962 a 'non-aligned' India had
been attacked by China and in 1965 by Pakistan. Pakistan and China
were becoming pals, and it was as you say "an ERA when
Communism/Dictatorship threatened Democracy." India had started its
nuclear programme then.

> What India chooses to spend it's money on has little
> to do with the USA.
But it does depend on what the US, (as I had written earlier) the rest
of the world and also its neighbours do.

> I mean who would want to invade India?
Nobody. I don't really think we live anymore in a world where
invasions will happen. Not anymore, not after Iraq. But nuclear
weapons aren't about preventing invasions. I mean who would want to
(or can) invade the US/UK/France/China/Russia but they still have
massive stockpiles.

> Although I do like the chicken
Come to India for the real deal. They probably give you the sanitised,
low-fat, low-spice version there. :-)

> But it's always easier to blame the US.
Actually I blamed the rest of the {nuclear} world along with it.

{Original Message removed}

2006\11\09@130018 by Mohit M. (Lists)

picon face
> I may not like my government, but I love my country.
Unfortunately, the difference between a country and its government is
almost indistinguishable to most foreigners.

But, please rest assured, this is not to say that I am blaming the
US/government solely for all world ills. ;-)

Mohit.

{Original Message removed}

2006\11\09@131041 by Victor Fraenckel

flavicon
face
Bob Axtell wrote:
>India itself could have paid for it, had it not spend ITS billions on
>its own nuclear arsenal.

Bob,
India is known as the the world's largest democracy and your point was also mine.

*____________________________________________________________________________________________*

*Victor Fraenckel
KC2GUI
victorf ATSIGN windreader DOT com**
*


2006\11\09@134150 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Victor Fraenckel wrote:

>>> How many children in India could have been helped with the BILLIONS
>>> that the world's largest democracy pi**ed away building a nuclear
>>> weapon?
>>
>> India itself could have paid for it, had it not spend ITS billions on
>> its own nuclear arsenal.
>
> India is known as the the world's largest democracy and your point was
> also mine.

Maybe if people wouldn't feel so often attacked when they aren't they
didn't have to resort to preemptive defense that often :)

Gerhard

2006\11\09@140924 by Josh Koffman

face picon face
This is no longer EE related. Move constructive comments to OT, and
don't post anything regards who is at fault for whatever weapons there
are, and who we're actually blaming, etc, etc.

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
       -Douglas Adams

2006\11\09@145058 by Anand Dhuru

flavicon
face

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shawn Wilton" <black9spamspam_OUTgmail.com>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <@spam@piclistKILLspamspammit.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2006 11:58 PM
Subject: Re: [EE] OLPC shipping date moved


> Yeah, from what I recall reading, Thailand dropped out and no longer
> wishes
> to purchase those laptops.  Are laptops REALLY what 3rd world children
> need?  How about decent food/shelter/medicine/education...  $100 in a 3rd
> world country goes a long ways.
>
>
>From an outsiders' perspective, the above makes sense. However, India
wouldnt have been where it is today, if it had not been for the then Prime
Minister's views on technology in general, specifically IT. Around 20 years
back, in an India with heavy socialistic leanings he decided to encourage
the industry on a scale most people thought crazy; the use of computers was
thought totally frivoulous, completely useless to our envirronment and in
fact seen as a threat by most people as something that would take their
jobs.

What Shawn says was pretty much what everybody felt.

If that whole generation of Indians had not got access to the
opportunity-equivaqlent of the $100 laptop, India would not have been the
power it is today.

Of course, as pointed out by others, ensuring that the benefits reach the
right targets and remain with them are a different thing altogether.

Anand.

2006\11\22@133138 by Vitaliy

picon face
Shawn Wilton wrote:
> Yeah, from what I recall reading, Thailand dropped out and no longer
> wishes
> to purchase those laptops.  Are laptops REALLY what 3rd world children
> need?  How about decent food/shelter/medicine/education...  $100 in a 3rd
> world country goes a long ways.

Providing laptops to children beats simply pouring money into third world
countries, by far. Money is wasted by corrupt governments. And food stores
are often hijacked by local militias, sold for money, and used to fuel the
local conflicts. The nice thing about these laptops is that they're not
easily convertible to guns.

And if the laptop really can replace a book, it makes perfect economic
sense. How many textbooks can you buy for $100?

Vitaliy

2006\11\22@145340 by Shawn Wilton

picon face
Some searching around will provide estimates that the usefulness of those
notebooks will not be fully achieved at the current sticker price of $140.
Most estimates say that providing the necessary infrastructure will raise
the cost per notebook to approximately $1k.

I still think the money would serve a more useful purpose to provide food,
medicine and schools/education.  For nations that have the necessary
food/medicine/education, then sure, cheap access to technology is
beneficial.

This link has two other interesting links in it.
<
http://www.engadget.com/2006/11/14/quanta-builds-the-first-ten-xo-1-prototypes/
>
<http://www.olpcnews.com/>



On 11/22/06, Vitaliy <KILLspampiclist.accountKILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\11\22@153949 by Bob Blick

face picon face
> Some searching around will provide estimates that the usefulness of those
> notebooks will not be fully achieved at the current sticker price of $140.
> Most estimates say that providing the necessary infrastructure will raise
> the cost per notebook to approximately $1k.

I just love these "estimates". Best Buy seems to be able to deliver a
Toshiba laptop to my city for $249 out the door:

http://www.bestbuy.com/site//olspage.jsp?id=pcmcat104300050017&type=category

Perhaps these "estimators" are using a subsidiary of KBR as their shipper:

http://www.halliburtonwatch.org/news/deyoung.html

Gobble gobble!

Cheerful regards,

Bob


2006\11\22@170727 by Vitaliy

picon face
Shawn Wilton wrote:
> I still think the money would serve a more useful purpose to provide food,
> medicine and schools/education.  For nations that have the necessary
> food/medicine/education, then sure, cheap access to technology is
> beneficial.

Of course, ideally you'd want the childrent to be clothed, fed, and
sheltered before you provide the technology. Unfortunately, you have corrupt
governments on one hand, and murderous warlords on the other. When you
provide money to the governments, how much of it do you think trickles down
to the schoolchildren? And food/medicine are too easily exchanged for money
(=guns, ammunition, soldiers).

Don't get me wrong; I'm not saying that developed countries should give
laptops to children dying of hunger and malaria, without tending to their
physical needs first. I simply disagree with the notion that the money spent
on laptops will be wasted.

Why not, instead of sending grants (and having them end up in some cronie's
pocket), provide the country's schoolchildren with $100 laptops? I really
like the idea, because education is an investment into the country's future
(you get more out than what you put in). Deliveries of food and medicine
provide only short-term relief, and create dependence on the donor.

Best regards,

Vitaliy

2006\11\22@173526 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Nov 22, 2006, at 10:31 AM, Vitaliy wrote:

> And if the laptop really can replace a book, it makes perfect
> economic sense. How many textbooks can you buy for $100?
>
Now THAT is an interesting observation.  I'm painfully aware of the
price I paid for college textbooks; how much does the average primary
school textbook cost?

Of course, textbooks are "intellectual property", and their cost is
only vaguely related to the cost of printing and distributing hardcover
books.  This is probably a shame, since my understanding is that the
distribution costs for textbooks IS a significant part of their real
cost.  But as with music, it's not clear that reducing the distribution
costs is going to result in reduced end-user prices without massive
changes in the associated publication culture.

BillW

2006\11\23@025159 by Vitaliy

picon face
William Chops Westfield wrote:
>> And if the laptop really can replace a book, it makes perfect
>> economic sense. How many textbooks can you buy for $100?
>>
> Now THAT is an interesting observation.  I'm painfully aware of the
> price I paid for college textbooks; how much does the average primary
> school textbook cost?

Depends on the book. However, it seems to me that if we only consider the
media and distribution costs, over the primary school curriculum the cost of
books (assuming an adequate supply) would exceed $100.

> Of course, textbooks are "intellectual property", and their cost is
> only vaguely related to the cost of printing and distributing hardcover
> books.  This is probably a shame, since my understanding is that the
> distribution costs for textbooks IS a significant part of their real
> cost.  But as with music, it's not clear that reducing the distribution
> costs is going to result in reduced end-user prices without massive
> changes in the associated publication culture.

A lot of books are in the public domain already, although most of them are
not what you would call a "textbook." Although, keeping in mind that that
this is a non-profit project, I'm sure the same forces that created
Wikipedia would compel people to join the "Open Textbook" project. There
would need to be proper regulation in place, of course.

Perhaps some authors would even allow their existing textbooks to be used in
electronic form in selected countries' curriculums.

As you have noted, the distribution costs are minimal; and the textbooks can
easily be updated. I still remember the time after the collapse of the USSR,
when for several years the teachers had to tell us that "we'll skip over
this section", "this is no longer true.."  :)

Vitaliy




2006\11\23@041414 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Nov 22, 2006, at 11:51 PM, Vitaliy wrote:

> I still remember the time after the collapse of the USSR,
> when for several years the teachers had to tell us that "we'll skip
> over
> this section", "this is no longer true.."  :)
>
Shucks, even in the USA we stilll have science textbooks that claim that
pluto is a PLANET.  My daughter is supposed to get to astronomy this
school year; I'll be curious to see how it is handled...

(I can, however, see a bit of political furor developing should the US
try to "dump" obsolete textbooks (that have entered the public domain)
on poorer nations.  Even if they are only a little bit obsolete.)

(Alas, yet another problem with the concept is that as I remember early
education (and in the case of my own children), textbooks (and tools
like
computers) are a lot less important than TEACHERS.  Perhaps a "One
Laptop
per Teacher" program should precede OLPC.  (but it would be harder to
protect from abuse.))

BillW

2006\11\23@045302 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> (Alas, yet another problem with the concept is that as I
> remember early
> education (and in the case of my own children), textbooks (and tools
> like
> computers) are a lot less important than TEACHERS.  Perhaps a "One
> Laptop
> per Teacher" program should precede OLPC.  (but it would be harder to
> protect from abuse.))

how about (in rough order of importance, check Maslov):
- zero bullets and (cluster) mines per child per day
- some food per child per day
- a home (building) per N childs
- a (at least one) living parent per X childs
- a school building per Y childs
- a teacher per Z childs

IMHO laptops come only after that, even the ones for teachers. And I
left medical care out.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu



2006\11\23@060206 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Nov 23, 2006, at 1:52 AM, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

> how about (in rough order of importance, check Maslov):
> - zero bullets and (cluster) mines per child per day
> - some food per child per day
> - a home (building) per N childs
> - a (at least one) living parent per X childs
> - a school building per Y childs
> - a teacher per Z childs
>
You accomplish nothing by eliminating everyone (or rather, you revert
to "only the rich have computers.)   Most "1st world" countries don't
achieve that for all children...

BillW

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2006 , 2007 only
- Today
- New search...