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'[EE] Molded Strain Relief on Serial Cables'
2005\04\08@175532 by Mike Hord

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Does anyone have a favorite method for making molded strain
reliefs for serial cables?  Or perhaps an alternate solution?

The problem I'm looking to solve is that we need DB9 at one
end and a proprietary watertight connector at the other.  We
can have the people who make the watertight connector put
it on the end of a DB9 cable, OR we can have them give us
a cable and put our own DB9 onto it.  The reason it becomes
a good idea for us to put our own DB9 on is to facilitate the
old RTS-CTS bridge.  The watertight connector only has 3
conductors, which are (logically enough) being used for TX,
RX, and ground, so no room for handshaking lines.

I don't really want to work out software handshaking, because
it isn't complex enough a situation to warrant it.  That leaves
CTS/RTS bridging, but that's hard to do without access to the
back of the DB9 (we COULD ask the makers of the connector
to tie the two wires together before soldering their connector
on, but that's just asking for something to get screwed up).

We also want to avoid those hokey clam-shell screw on jobs,
which leaves us making molded strain reliefs and boots.  We
do some other molding type things, but the material we use
is FAR to stiff for this.

Any ideas?  We have adequate facilities, etc., to make a
good quality mold if we decide to.

Mike H.

2005\04\08@191541 by Brent Brown

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> Does anyone have a favorite method for making molded strain
> reliefs for serial cables?  Or perhaps an alternate solution?

We use "standard" moulded D9 and D25 computer cables, and get an
assembly contractor to fit the custom plug to the other end. Buy either
Male/Male or Female/Female leads and cut in half to get two leads out of
one. Various lengths are available, they have all 9 wires plus shield, and
usually the colour coding doesn't change (if you keep buying from the same
supplier). This for us is cheaper and easier than fitting our own D9
connectors, and the moulded ends are much nicer. Likewise, we require two
wires to be joined in the D9, but we just do it at the other end of the cable in
the hood of our custom connector.

Perhaps there may be some long term problems with supply of these off the
shelf moulded computer cables as PC RS232 and Centronics parallel ports
fade out, but not yet anyway.

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, Hamilton 2001, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell/txt: 025 334 069
eMail:  spam_OUTbrent.brownTakeThisOuTspamclear.net.nz


2005\04\09@081500 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Mike Hord wrote:

> I don't really want to work out software handshaking, because
> it isn't complex enough a situation to warrant it.  That leaves
> CTS/RTS bridging, but that's hard to do without access to the
> back of the DB9 (we COULD ask the makers of the connector
> to tie the two wires together before soldering their connector
> on, but that's just asking for something to get screwed up).

Why do you need CTS/RTS bridging? Are you accessing terminals where that is
hardwired?

Gerhard

2005\04\11@091346 by Mike Hord

picon face
> > I don't really want to work out software handshaking, because
> > it isn't complex enough a situation to warrant it.  That leaves
> > CTS/RTS bridging, but that's hard to do without access to the
> > back of the DB9 (we COULD ask the makers of the connector
> > to tie the two wires together before soldering their connector
> > on, but that's just asking for something to get screwed up).
>
> Why do you need CTS/RTS bridging? Are you accessing terminals where that is
> hardwired?
>
> Gerhard

I question that myself, but I'm just going by what I've been
told.  For my own testing of the device in question, in HyperTerm,
I just turn all handshaking off and it works fabulously.

Mike H.

2005\04\12@081638 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Mike Hord wrote:

>> Why do you need CTS/RTS bridging? Are you accessing terminals where that
>> is hardwired?
>
> I question that myself, but I'm just going by what I've been told.  For
> my own testing of the device in question, in HyperTerm, I just turn all
> handshaking off and it works fabulously.

That's what I do, too (with TeraTerm though :). I can't imagine a PC
software terminal (not in Windows, not on *nix or Mac) that would require
hardware handshake signals. Hence my question...

I don't bridge anything when I have to connect serial data to a PC. I
simply connect two or three wires (if I don't need hardware handshake) and
that's it.

Gerhard

2005\04\12@090124 by Mike Hord

picon face
> That's what I do, too (with TeraTerm though :). I can't imagine a PC
> software terminal (not in Windows, not on *nix or Mac) that would require
> hardware handshake signals. Hence my question...
>
> I don't bridge anything when I have to connect serial data to a PC. I
> simply connect two or three wires (if I don't need hardware handshake) and
> that's it.

Perhaps a better solution would be to have the client software written
differently, then.  That may or may not be within my grasp.

Mike H.

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