Searching \ for '[EE] MPLAB IDE support will be discontinued on Win' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/ios.htm?key=port
Search entire site for: 'MPLAB IDE support will be discontinued on Win'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE] MPLAB IDE support will be discontinued on Win'
2006\04\06@135955 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Thu, 2006-04-06 at 19:56 +0800, Xiaofan Chen wrote:
> want to switch. I finally boot Ubuntu Breezy 32bit more often than
> Windows XP at home starting from this year so I could qualified to
> be called a real Linux user now...

I was doing the dual boot thing for years, and I found the inconvenience
of going back and forth meant I spent most of my time in Windows.

Only way IMHO to go for Linux is to go outright. Once you force yourself
to use Linux you'll find you learn things so much more quickly. Only
problem now is I'm starting to FORGET some of the Windows stuff, but
that's OK... :)

TTYL



2006\04\06@140248 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Thu, 2006-04-06 at 13:04 -0400, Peter Todd wrote:
> I used to experiment more with different distro's and OSes, Slackware,
> RedHat, the various BSD's, but now that I've been using Linux
> exclusively for years, I know Debian very well and it's predictable.
> I'm sure RedHat etc. has features that I'm missing, but it's good
> enough.

I tried Debian once. It had a few issues with the hardware I had at the
time and I never went back.

The later versions of Redhat/Fedora have a very good implementation of
yum (very similar to apt-get), and as long as to add the correct depots
it works extremely well. I rarely use rpm directly anymore.

TTYL

2006\04\06@141041 by Marcel Birthelmer

picon face
I like VMWare for this sort of thing. You can run a virtual windows instance
on linux, share disks between them, share outside network if desired, and
even patch USB through to the vmware system in case there's a peripheral
that doesn't have a linux driver. and it's not that expensive.
- Marcel

On 4/6/06, Herbert Graf <spam_OUTmailinglist2TakeThisOuTspamfarcite.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\04\06@141259 by Peter Todd

picon face
On Thu, Apr 06, 2006 at 02:03:11PM -0400, Herbert Graf wrote:
> On Thu, 2006-04-06 at 13:04 -0400, Peter Todd wrote:
> > I used to experiment more with different distro's and OSes, Slackware,
> > RedHat, the various BSD's, but now that I've been using Linux
> > exclusively for years, I know Debian very well and it's predictable.
> > I'm sure RedHat etc. has features that I'm missing, but it's good
> > enough.
>
> I tried Debian once. It had a few issues with the hardware I had at the
> time and I never went back.
>
> The later versions of Redhat/Fedora have a very good implementation of
> yum (very similar to apt-get), and as long as to add the correct depots
> it works extremely well. I rarely use rpm directly anymore.

Yeah, I started using Debian, because I heard of this great apt-get
thing that it had that RedHat didn't. Then sure enough, a year later I
start working at a software company... that was developing embedded
systems using RedHat with apt-get!

Still, I never looked back. :)

--
.....peteKILLspamspam@spam@petertodd.ca http://www.petertodd.ca

2006\04\06@141910 by Danny Sauer
flavicon
face
Herbert wrote regarding 'Re: [EE] MPLAB IDE support will be discontinued on Win 98/ME/NT' on Thu, Apr 06 at 13:08:
> The later versions of Redhat/Fedora have a very good implementation of
> yum (very similar to apt-get), and as long as to add the correct depots
> it works extremely well. I rarely use rpm directly anymore.

While I'll agree that yum is nice (*finally* I can use remote
repositories and auto-resolve remote dependencies with RPM), it
doesn't have the really cool features of apt - such as the version
pinning, etc.  But it's easy to get by without those.

The real reason I repsonded was to clarify that RedHat doesn't use
yum.  It's in Fedora, but it's not in RedHat Enterprise Linux (as far
as I can tell).  That's a shame, because we could really use a way to
centralize and distribute the repositories of software on our RedHat
clusters.  Well, we could use a way that's better than putting
everything in one folder and NFS mounting it on the clients.  Multiple
repositoy support would be nice...  One day I'll convince the other
admins that it's worthwhile to just make apt a part of our normal
builds.  One day. :)

--Danny, who prefers Ubuntu for most situations

2006\04\06@142308 by Danny Sauer

flavicon
face
Marcel wrote regarding 'Re: [EE] MPLAB IDE support will be discontinued on Win 98/ME/NT' on Thu, Apr 06 at 13:16:
> I like VMWare for this sort of thing. You can run a virtual windows instance
> on linux, share disks between them, share outside network if desired, and
> even patch USB through to the vmware system in case there's a peripheral
> that doesn't have a linux driver. and it's not that expensive.

It's now free if you don't need some of workstaitons features (like
snapshots and some of the memory optimization), actually. :)
http://www.vmware.com/products/server/

The C API they're releasing soon looks pretty cool, too.

--Danny

2006\04\06@143446 by andrew kelley

picon face
> Yeah, I started using Debian, because I heard of this great apt-get
> thing that it had that RedHat didn't. Then sure enough, a year later I
> start working at a software company... that was developing embedded
> systems using RedHat with apt-get!

I prefer slackware, just because I have been using it for years, and
it is a very simple distro, easy to get it setup how you like it once
you know how, and it has current kernels.  I don't like tools which
install binaries, but I like to compile the apps myself.

andrew

2006\04\06@231728 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Thu, 2006-04-06 at 13:23 -0500, Danny Sauer wrote:
> Marcel wrote regarding 'Re: [EE] MPLAB IDE support will be discontinued on Win 98/ME/NT' on Thu, Apr 06 at 13:16:
> > I like VMWare for this sort of thing. You can run a virtual windows instance
> > on linux, share disks between them, share outside network if desired, and
> > even patch USB through to the vmware system in case there's a peripheral
> > that doesn't have a linux driver. and it's not that expensive.
>
> It's now free if you don't need some of workstaitons features (like
> snapshots and some of the memory optimization), actually. :)
> http://www.vmware.com/products/server/

Amazing! I've always been interested in their products but was never
able to justify the price. Free OTOH is a GOOD price!

Just finished installing it on my machine at work (runs Linux, will use
VMWare to run windows for the odd windows only app my company wants me
to run). Installing it right now on my WinXP laptop to run Fedora on the
road! SWEET!

Thanks for the heads up. TTYL

2006\04\07@091930 by Byron A Jeff

face picon face
On Thu, Apr 06, 2006 at 02:34:45PM -0400, andrew kelley wrote:
> > Yeah, I started using Debian, because I heard of this great apt-get
> > thing that it had that RedHat didn't. Then sure enough, a year later I
> > start working at a software company... that was developing embedded
> > systems using RedHat with apt-get!
>
> I prefer slackware, just because I have been using it for years, and
> it is a very simple distro, easy to get it setup how you like it once
> you know how, and it has current kernels.  I don't like tools which
> install binaries, but I like to compile the apps myself.

This used to be me. But without package management you get the Linux
analog of DLL Hell where each package depends on a ton of sublibs that
are either not installed or are not updated enough to support the software.
Whereas with Debian, often a simple:

apt-get install package

will install the package and all the dependent libs.

This issue finally drove me away from Slackware. A few years ago I started
using Knoppix, which is Debian based, in my Unix/Linux classes. The hard
disk installs were capable enough, and the apt system works well. So as
I have upgraded my Slack boxes, like the last one that choked on a libc
upgrade trying to get Firefox running, I've switched to Debian. I only have
one Slackware box left, and it'll probably be changed to Debian next month
when I try out this multiseat Linux setup that I've found here:

http://www.linuxtoys.org/multiseat/multiseat.html

Knoppix 5.0 comes with the Xorg 6.9 required to pull off the project. So
I'll probably install it when I changeover.

I had used Slack for over 10 years since its inception. But times do change.

BAJ

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2006 , 2007 only
- Today
- New search...