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'[EE] J1939 (was Re: [EE]you can build & host youro'
2007\10\10@124204 by Tony Smith

picon face
> > I always wondered, if it's possible to know (at least very
> > approximately), what percentage of software (expressed in #
> of lines
> > of code, or whatever) is written in VC++ vs VB vs Delphi vs
> Whatever.
>
> But let's say 1000 lines of VC++, and 100 lines of Python.
> Does that say that VC++ is more popular, or that Python gets
> the same job done with less lines?
>
> LOC is an indication of the amount of work available in a
> certain language, but is that realy interesting?
>
> An IMHO more interesting measurement would be how much
> functionality is implemented in each language, but
> quantifying functionality is not easy.
> LOC is surely not appropriate, function points are sometimes used.


High LOC probably means your spending your time making bolts for the engine
you've yet to make the rest of the parts for.  Or you've picked the wrong
language.  Webserver in COBOL?  Why not?

Low LOC probably means the engine was provided, but you only have a choice
between a supercharged rotary from a WWII bomber, or a 25cc two-stroke from
a whippersnipper.  But hey, you're not making bolts*.

VB would probably be the most popular language; due to ease of use, age,
typical choice for corporate apps, etc.  (Then there's VBA as well, like for
Access etc).  Plenty of COBOL as well.  I know some companies using Delphi,
and even TurboPascal.  (The CNC program TurboCNC is Borland Pascal).  Kylix
was Delphi for Linux, but it dies a while back IIRC.

Who knows if that translates to LOC.  You could never count it as you never
see most of it.

It's hard to count LOC anyway.  If I drop a control onto a form, I've
written zero LOC, but the GUI just wrote 100 LOC for me behind the scenes.
Does that count?

Tony


* I actually made a bolt-type thingy yesterday, but it was a real one, out
of metal and everything.  Metric thread, if anyone is interested.

2007\10\10@141351 by wouter van ooijen

face picon face
> As of those different computer language (C++, Delphi, Basic,
> etc), My personal opinion is:
> Those are just different tools (of course each one get its
> own advantages and disadvantages, and each one does get a
> reason to exist), it could be just a personal-favor type of thing.
>  
> So it is important to pick one working for you and making
> yourself very comfortable with the language-tool you picked.

Hmmmm. I do a lot with *one* screwdriver, from lifting PICs from their
socket to opening sealed boxes and making holes in wood. Occasionaly I
also use it to do something with screws. Some have a flat groove, some
are philips style. Most mechanical guys would frown at me if they knew.
Can you imagine me frowning at you? (Whether either frowning is
legitimate or not is an interesting discussion.)

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu



2007\10\10@181833 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
wouter van ooijen wrote:
> But let's say 1000 lines of VC++, and 100 lines of Python. Does that say
> that VC++ is more popular, or that Python gets the same job done with
> less lines?
>
> LOC is an indication of the amount of work available in a certain
> language, but is that realy interesting?

Yeah, I guess you're right.

> An IMHO more interesting measurement would be how much functionality is
> implemented in each language, but quantifying functionality is not easy.
> LOC is surely not appropriate, function points are sometimes used.

That would surely be difficult.

Okay, how about expressing language popularity in terms of programmer-hours?
That wouldn't be meaningless.

2007\10\11@002011 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Vitaliy wrote:

> Okay, how about expressing language popularity in terms of
> programmer-hours? That wouldn't be meaningless.

Probably better than LOC, but still not good as it doesn't consider
different productivity. Maybe money spent on programmers? That at least
would attempt to catch different productivities.

But then, neither programmer-hours nor money spent on programmers would
include most open-source community projects (no statistics about hours, no
money at all).

Gerhard

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