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'[EE] Induction motor ID'
2012\05\02@215527 by IVP

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Dear collective brain,

trying to determine the type of motor I'm wanting to use a speed
controller with

The label says Class E Induction Motor, 120W, 50Hz, 1400rpm

Unfortunately not branded so I can't get more information. At this
stage I'm reluctant to strip the whole machine down so I can take
the motor completely apart

>From what I can see - P and N go into the motor case via the power
switch. A 4uF 250VAC capacitor is on the outside, with two wires
going from it into the motor. With the cap disconnected I read 144
ohms across those two wires, and 45 ohms across P and N

Comparing with the diagrams, the most likely configuration looks
like (to me) a Permanent Split Capacitor, with a 45 ohm Run winding
and 99 ohm Start winding

Sound reasonable ? BTW, the ticks and crosses indicate which motors
are suitable for this speed controller

TIA

Joe


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2012\05\02@223424 by Marcel Duchamp

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See "AC Induction Motor Fundamentals" (00887a.pdf) by Microchip.  It's a good induction motor primer.  Pages 11 and 12 describe the various motor classes.

On 5/2/2012 6:54 PM, IVP wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2012\05\02@231024 by Robert Rolf

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Listen for a 'click' when the motor first starts, or spins down. That would
be a motor
with a centrifugal switch, and you'll hear the weights snapping back and
forth.,
which won't work with the controller.
Given the power rating it likely does NOT have a centrifugal switch, so you
should
be OK with your controller.
If you can monitor the motor current with a scope, you will see an abrupt,
step change in
current if is has a switch, and rounded pulse if it just uses a static
capacitor.

2012\05\02@231418 by Robert Rolf

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On Wed, May 2, 2012 at 9:10 PM, Robert Rolf <spam_OUTRobert.RolfTakeThisOuTspamualberta.ca> wrote:

> Listen for a 'click' when the motor first starts, or spins down. That
> would be a motor
> with a centrifugal switch, and you'll hear the weights snapping back and
> forth.,
> which won't work with the controller.
> Given the power rating it likely does NOT have a centrifugal switch, so
> you should
> be OK with your controller.
> If you can monitor the motor current with a scope, you will see an abrupt,
> step change in
> current if is has a switch, and rounded pulse if it just uses a static
> capacitor.
>
> R
>
> You can also look for AC voltage on the cap when the motor is running.
If the capacitor is being switched out, it won't be there during 'run'.
Given the value of the cap you have, it is likely a 'run cap' since 'start'
caps
tend to be larger

2012\05\03@031739 by IVP
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> Listen for a 'click' when the motor first starts, or spins down. That
> would be a motor with a centrifugal switch

I've a couple of larger motors which have quite an audible click, and
this small one doesn't, so I'm reasonably confident it's not switched

- Marcel -

Thanks for the pdf. I've had a read, informativ

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