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'[EE] IR recvr'
2008\10\17@212605 by Dr Skip

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I'm looking to use an IR link in an upcoming project and found that Vishay has
3 OK priced receiver modules: TSOP36236TR, TSOP6236TR, TSOP36238TR - 36kHz and
38kHz.

Does anyone have anything good or bad to say about them?

It's going to be exposed to sunlight in an outdoor environment. It won't
receive in that environment, but I'm concerned about its output starting to go
from the 'noise'. I used to have a TV that would come on at a certain time in
the pm everyday in a certain month when sunlight hit it. Which would be better,
36 kHz or 38? Also, are these things matched to particular IR LEDs or is the
optical bandwidth wide enough on all IR LEDs that any will do?

At $2 ea, are there better-cheaper ones I should consider? The signal won't be
standard, but custom and kept simple - some simple pulse train for on/off.
False triggering from being near a window or such needs to be avoided, also in
a simple manner.

Thanks in advance,
Skip

2008\10\17@232212 by Dr Skip

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Sorry for the bandwidth - I think 40kHz will be more like it, and not
these units. My product questions are mostly answered, but I could still
use any advice from those that have been here before. ;)

-Skip


Dr Skip wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\10\18@035526 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> I'm looking to use an IR link in an upcoming project and found that Vishay has
> 3 OK priced receiver modules: TSOP36236TR, TSOP6236TR, TSOP36238TR - 36kHz and
> 38kHz.
>
> Does anyone have anything good or bad to say about them?

In my experience they all work.

> It's going to be exposed to sunlight in an outdoor environment. It won't
> receive in that environment, but I'm concerned about its output starting to go
> from the 'noise'. I used to have a TV that would come on at a certain time in
> the pm everyday in a certain month when sunlight hit it. Which would be better,
> 36 kHz or 38? Also, are these things matched to particular IR LEDs or is the
> optical bandwidth wide enough on all IR LEDs that any will do?

Check the datasheets :)

Again, in my experience all combinations work, but I did not compare the
 ranges.

> At $2 ea, are there better-cheaper ones I should consider? The signal won't be
> standard, but custom and kept simple - some simple pulse train for on/off.
> False triggering from being near a window or such needs to be avoided, also in
> a simple manner.

Simple and robust against false triggering does not combine.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2008\10\18@110312 by Michael Algernon

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is this a one-off project or many units ?
Michael


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> --

2008\10\18@120016 by Mike Harrison

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On Sat, 18 Oct 2008 09:02:46 -0600, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

The Vishay parts are excellent all round.
In addiiton to being generally good, small, cheap etc. ,they have a big advantage in low-power
systems in that they power up very quickly compared to most of the Far East types, so it's feasible
to power-cycle them to save power.

Any IR system will have to deal with noise but that's down to your software to reject it.
A TV that turns on when sun hits it obviously has very poor decoding.

No obvious difference between 36 & 38 ( even when detecing 36/38K modulated signals!) Use whichever
is cheaper/more available.
See the datasheet for their spectral response - I don't think it's too critical.

If using the SMD ones make sure you order the right type - the parts are the same but there are 2
reeling options, packed for horizontal or vertical mounting.


2008\10\19@025152 by Vasile Surducan

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fig.11 from datasheet
http://www.vishay.com/docs/82187/tsop362x.pdf
is the answer for transmission LED wavelenght (you can't speak about
bandwith here because an IR LED has a bandwith of 10-20nm)
and fig.5 for the max frequency modulation

In direct sunlight almost sure will not work, will be blinded by the sun.
You need an extra black or blue lense in front of it.

Vasile

On 10/17/08, Dr Skip <spam_OUTdrskipTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\10\19@042907 by Mike Harrison

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On Sat, 18 Oct 2008 23:51:49 -0700, you wrote:

>fig.11 from datasheet
>http://www.vishay.com/docs/82187/tsop362x.pdf
>is the answer for transmission LED wavelenght (you can't speak about
>bandwith here because an IR LED has a bandwith of 10-20nm)
>and fig.5 for the max frequency modulation
>
>In direct sunlight almost sure will not work, will be blinded by the sun.
>You need an extra black or blue lense in front of it.

These sensors already have a black IR-pass filter as the case material - the sun has plenty of NIR
content so filtering won't help much  - the only solution is to shade the sensor so direct sunlght
doesn't hit it.
 

2008\10\19@135625 by Dr Skip

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Thanks all for the advice. Yes, the intent wasn't to have it directly into the
sun, but to have a short shade/tube on it to prevent such. With that taken care
of, my concern would be for ambient sunlight, reflection, or even modulation of
a reflection from leaves or passing vehicles. Is that something to worry about,
or can it be tackled with something like a preset 'header' pattern in the
transmission or a check bit or two?

-Skip


> These sensors already have a black IR-pass filter as the case material - the sun has plenty of NIR
> content so filtering won't help much  - the only solution is to shade the sensor so direct sunlght
> doesn't hit it.
>  
>

2008\10\19@144719 by Michael Algernon

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Including error checking and/or error correction is a good idea.  Test  
your scheme by waving the receiver out in the sun with a shade tube  
and see what kind of erroneous slip through.  You can automate the  
testing by mounting the receiver on a "shake" platform.
Michael

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> --

2008\10\19@145345 by Mike Harrison

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On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 13:56:19 -0400, you wrote:

>Thanks all for the advice. Yes, the intent wasn't to have it directly into the
>sun, but to have a short shade/tube on it to prevent such. With that taken care
>of, my concern would be for ambient sunlight, reflection, or even modulation of
>a reflection from leaves or passing vehicles. Is that something to worry about,
>or can it be tackled with something like a preset 'header' pattern in the
>transmission or a check bit or two?

When you are decoding, you need to measure the pulse & gap lengths to decode the data -  simply
having a minimum & maximum limit on these times & resetting your receive process when they are
violated will filter out the vast majority of the noise


2008\10\19@163448 by Jinx

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> filter out the vast majority of the noise

Some schemes use a repeat send as a confirmation, ie the data is
sent twice and the two packets are compared

An RC5 transmitter

http://www.selectronic.fr/includes_selectronic/pdf/Philips/SAA3010.PDF

(which BTW make good general purpose keypad decoders)


'[EE] IR recvr'
2009\05\26@112829 by alan smith
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I've used a couple different ones, and most preform about the same.  However, as others have posted, the sunlight will pretty much kill your reception, at least in direct sunlight its going to be saturated and your not going to get anything of value out of it.

One thing I have noticed, at least with florescent lighting, additional filtering does indeed help.  Doesn't with sunlight.


     

2009\05\26@114205 by Joshua Shriver

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For home use I use one of these at home on my computer. Though I can see it
being used with PIC's.

http://www.lirc.org/receivers.html

-Josh

On Tue, May 26, 2009 at 11:28 AM, alan smith <.....micro_eng2KILLspamspam@spam@yahoo.com> wrote:

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