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'[EE] How do you use this kind of prototyping board'
2009\01\11@191957 by solarwind

picon face
I know how to use these: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/STPBRD1.jpg

but how do you use these: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/EXPBRD.jpg ?

I'm asking because I have one of these
http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/TQFP_100.jpg for my PIC32 and I need
a way to prototype with it.

--
solarwind

2009\01\11@192107 by solarwind

picon face
Just a note: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/EXPBRD.jpg the board
shown in the picture has individual plated through-holes which are not
connected in any way on either side.

2009\01\11@203508 by Carl Denk

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face
I think by definition "plated through-holes" implies that there is
electrical continuity between both sides.  ~)

solarwind wrote:
> Just a note: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/EXPBRD.jpg the board
> shown in the picture has individual plated through-holes which are not
> connected in any way on either side.
>  

2009\01\11@204848 by solarwind

picon face
On Sun, Jan 11, 2009 at 8:34 PM, Carl Denk <spam_OUTcdenkTakeThisOuTspamalltel.net> wrote:
> I think by definition "plated through-holes" implies that there is
> electrical continuity between both sides.  ~)

So what does that mean? If I were to stick an IC on that board, how do
I connect the pins to something like an LED, for example? It's not a
strip board where there is continuity along the stripes.


--
solarwind

2009\01\11@205357 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
Yes, but he means that they have a pad on each side (which are
connected to each other) but no two pads on a particular side are
connected. In other words, it is a "pad per hole" pattern.

I don't really like those kind of boards but when I have to use them,
I usually either solder SMT components between the pads or I use wires
to connect things together. When I need to connect several pins or
wires together in one spot, I bend them together and bridge them with
solder.

It looks like the TQFP adaptor is meant to use ribbon cable
connections. That is one possibility, or you could also solder pin
headers to the holes around the perimeter and then either solder these
directly to the proto board or use sockets.

I would recommend that for something as complex as a calculator, it
would be worth it to learn to have a PCB made. It is not that
expensive anymore.

Sean


On Sun, Jan 11, 2009 at 8:34 PM, Carl Denk <.....cdenkKILLspamspam@spam@alltel.net> wrote:
> I think by definition "plated through-holes" implies that there is
> electrical continuity between both sides.  ~)
>
> solarwind wrote:
>> Just a note: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/EXPBRD.jpg the board
>> shown in the picture has individual plated through-holes which are not
>> connected in any way on either side.
>>
> -

2009\01\11@221901 by Joseph Bento

face
flavicon
face

On Jan 11, 2009, at 6:48 PM, solarwind wrote:
>
> So what does that mean? If I were to stick an IC on that board, how do
> I connect the pins to something like an LED, for example? It's not a
> strip board where there is continuity along the stripes.
>

You need to supply the wire yourself.  #30 wire-wrap wire is ideal.  
You can either interconnect your components with the wire in any plane  
on the board, or you can simulate stripboard by soldering the wire to  
the individual pads - after populating your components, of course.  
One potential advantage to this board is you are not limited by the  
horizontal plane as you are with stripboard.

Heh, you play a guitar, Solarwind?  Try a real old-style project where  
you punch a chassis and wire up your own tube amp.  :-)  All point to  
point wiring.

Joe

2009\01\11@223055 by solarwind

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On Sun, Jan 11, 2009 at 10:18 PM, Joseph Bento <josephspamKILLspamkirtland.com> wrote:
> Heh, you play a guitar, Solarwind?

A little.

--
solarwind

2009\01\12@070349 by Bob Ammerman

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>I know how to use these: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/STPBRD1.jpg
(stripboard)
> but how do you use these: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/EXPBRD.jpg ?
(pad per hole board)

I like to use kynar wire wrap wire wrapped onto (just a couple turns) and
soldered to the device/socket pins.

-- Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

> I'm asking because I have one of these
> http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/TQFP_100.jpg for my PIC32 and I need
> a way to prototype with it.
>
> --
> solarwind
> --

2009\01\12@072412 by olin piclist

face picon face
solarwind wrote:
> Just a note: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/EXPBRD.jpg the board
> shown in the picture has individual plated through-holes which are not
> connected in any way on either side.

And you're point is ? .....


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\01\12@072940 by olin piclist

face picon face
solarwind wrote:
> So what does that mean? If I were to stick an IC on that board, how do
> I connect the pins to something like an LED, for example? It's not a
> strip board where there is continuity along the stripes.

I've always thought that was silly too.  My ReadyBoards
(http://www.embedinc.com/products) all have strips of 5 pads connected
together in the same pattern as the popular solderless breadboards.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\01\12@105400 by johnferrell

face picon face

The advantage of this type of board is that it allows you to prototype the
future PC Board. For one-off projects it is difficult to build smaller
unless you use dead-bug or Manhatten styles of construction. Don't overlook
the possibility of simply cutting off the amount of board you are really
going to use! With a little patience you can duplicate an existing pc
board.

John Ferrell W8CCW
Original Message:
-----------------
From: solarwind .....x.solarwind.xKILLspamspam.....gmail.com
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2009 19:19:33 -0500
To: EraseMEpiclistspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu
Subject: [EE] How do you use this kind of prototyping board?


I know how to use these: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/STPBRD1.jpg

but how do you use these: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/EXPBRD.jpg ?

I'm asking because I have one of these
http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/TQFP_100.jpg for my PIC32 and I need
a way to prototype with it.

--
solarwind

2009\01\12@113319 by Dave Tweed

face
flavicon
face
solarwind wrote:
> I know how to use these: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/STPBRD1.jpg
> but how do you use these: http://www.futurlec.com/Pictures/EXPBRD.jpg ?

Pad-per-hole board can be used to build really compact one-off projects
and prototypes when used in conjunction with a "wiring pencil" that
contains wire with solder-through insulation. Vero-Wire is one example:

  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiring_pencil

  http://www.verotl.com/vero-wire

I have used it on multiple occasions, and it works rather well. Stick the
components through the holes, crimp the leads slightly so they don't fall
out and trim them to reasonable lengths, then wrap the wire around the
lead a few turns and solder everything together (lead, wire, pad). Trim
the leads again if necessary. Use sockets for all ICs.

You can also use the technique on bare perfboard, although the components
tend to wiggle around unless glued down. I also like using a kind of
pad-per-hole board that does NOT have plated-through holes -- instead,
the other side (component side) is a perforated ground plane, with
clearance around the holes.

-- Dave Tweed

2009\01\12@180627 by Mike snyder

picon face
On Mon, Jan 12, 2009 at 11:32 AM, Dave Tweed <picspamspam_OUTdtweed.com> wrote:
>
>   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiring_pencil
>
>   http://www.verotl.com/vero-wire
>
> I have used it on multiple occasions, and it works rather well. Stick the
> components through the holes, crimp the leads slightly so they don't fall
> out and trim them to reasonable lengths, then wrap the wire around the
> lead a few turns and solder everything together (lead, wire, pad). Trim
> the leads again if necessary. Use sockets for all ICs.
>
> You can also use the technique on bare perfboard, although the components
> tend to wiggle around unless glued down. I also like using a kind of
> pad-per-hole board that does NOT have plated-through holes -- instead,
> the other side (component side) is a perforated ground plane, with
> clearance around the holes.
>

Never knew about this one, do you know of a US based supplier that
sells this? Tried google but did not get anywhere.

Thanks
Mike

2009\01\12@182739 by Roger, in Bangkok

face
flavicon
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www.verotl.com/vero-technologies-ltd-canada-usa-distributors

On Tue, Jan 13, 2009 at 6:02 AM, Mike snyder <@spam@msnyder19KILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2009\01\13@034416 by John Chung

picon face
Bob,

What tool do you use for wire-wrap?

John


--- On Mon, 1/12/09, Bob Ammerman <RemoveMErammermanTakeThisOuTspamverizon.net> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2009\01\13@043954 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>What tool do you use for wire-wrap?

I do the same as Bob describes when doing PCB mods, and use fine nose pliers
to put a couple of turns of wire wrap wire around the pin before soldering
it.

You cannot just leave it as a wrap connection, as the pin is the wrong
shape, it has to be soldered.

2009\01\13@111135 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
>>
>> I like to use kynar wire wrap wire wrapped onto (just a
>> couple turns) and
>> soldered to the device/socket pins.
>>
>> -- Bob Ammerman
>> RAm Systems

> Bob,
>
> What tool do you use for wire-wrap?
>
> John

Good question. I've had it for over 25 years. I think it was made by OK
products.
It is a pencil sized tool, with an aluminum tubing barrel about 6mm in
diameter.
The tip has a (brass?) insert with a slot for the wirewrap wire.

-- Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

2009\01\13@120317 by Nicola Perotto

picon face
Like this?
http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=68


Bob Ammerman wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2009\01\13@122955 by William Bross

picon face
Nicola Perotto wrote:

>Like this?
>http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=68
>
>  
>
and this:
<http://www.radioshack.com/search/index.jsp?kwCatId=&kw=wire%20wrap%20tool&origkw=Wire%20Wrap%20Tool&sr=1>

half the price of SparkFun

Bill

2009\01\13@124234 by Stephen D. Barnes

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face
William Bross wrote:
> Nicola Perotto wrote:
>
>  
>> Like this?
>> www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=68
>>
>>  
>>
>>    
> and this:
> <http://www.radioshack.com/search/index.jsp?kwCatId=&kw=wire%20wrap%20tool&origkw=Wire%20Wrap%20Tool&sr=1>
>
> half the price of SparkFun
>
> Bill
>  
Be careful though, according to the technical specs, only english
language is supported ;-)

--
Regards,
Stephen D. Barnes

"Banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies."
Thomas Jefferson

2009\01\13@135625 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
>>> Bob,
>>>
>>> What tool do you use for wire-wrap?
>>>
>>> John

>> Good question. I've had it for over 25 years. I think it was made by OK
>> products.
>> It is a pencil sized tool, with an aluminum tubing barrel about 6mm in
>> diameter.
>> The tip has a (brass?) insert with a slot for the wirewrap wire.
>>
>> -- Bob Ammerman
>> RAm Systems

> Like this?
> http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=68

Not quite. But I once had one similar to that which also worked quite well.


-- Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

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