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'[EE] How do you prototype mixed SMD and thru-hole?'
2008\08\21@203227 by Peter Loron

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I've got some things I'm tinkering with now that will use mixed SMD  
and thru-hole components. I've used some of the SMD adapters (SOT-23  
to DIP, etc), but those aren't really practical once you get beyond a  
few components and are sorta klunky.

Any pointers to good mixed type prototype boards? I've been looking at  
this unit from SparkFun, but I don't need the power supply + USB stuff.

http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8723

Thanks.

-Pete

2008\08\21@210020 by peter green

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Peter Loron wrote:
> I've got some things I'm tinkering with now that will use mixed SMD  
> and thru-hole components. I've used some of the SMD adapters (SOT-23  
> to DIP, etc), but those aren't really practical once you get beyond a  
> few components and are sorta klunky.
>
> Any pointers to good mixed type prototype boards? I've been looking at  
> this unit from SparkFun, but I don't need the power supply + USB stuff
>  
One possibility is to either use adaptors or readymade demo boards to
check out the chips suitability then go straight to PCB from there.  Of
course the practicality of this depends on your confidence, how the
time/money tradeoff works out for you and how quickly you can get PCBs
made (at uni I can generally put the designs in to our departments PCB
facility one day and pick up the boards the next).

2008\08\22@001111 by Vitaliy

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peter green wrote:
> Peter Loron wrote:
>> I've got some things I'm tinkering with now that will use mixed SMD
>> and thru-hole components. I've used some of the SMD adapters (SOT-23
>> to DIP, etc), but those aren't really practical once you get beyond a
>> few components and are sorta klunky.
>>
>> Any pointers to good mixed type prototype boards? I've been looking at
>> this unit from SparkFun, but I don't need the power supply + USB stuff
>>
> One possibility is to either use adaptors or readymade demo boards to
> check out the chips suitability then go straight to PCB from there.  Of
> course the practicality of this depends on your confidence, how the
> time/money tradeoff works out for you and how quickly you can get PCBs
> made (at uni I can generally put the designs in to our departments PCB
> facility one day and pick up the boards the next).

I agree with Peter Green. I think that even for hobby applications, it makes
sense to prototype the parts of the circuit you aren't too sure about, then
order (or build) the PCB. Lately we've had good success with Advanced
Circuits' "barebones" PCBs. It's possible to place the order on Monday, and
get it by Friday -- for under $100. If you're in a real big rush, you can
pay for overnight shipping and get the boards in 2 or 3 days.

https://www.barebonespcb.com/!BB1.asp

Even if you mess up the first time, cuting traces and greenwiring the
changes is easier and a lot less frustrating than trying to use SMT parts on
a protoboard. And if time to market is of any concern, this is the way to
go -- you may end up with a fully functioning board the first time, or make
a couple of small changes and move to production within a couple of weeks
(since you have the gerbers already).

Sincerely,

Vitaliy

2008\08\22@130215 by Peter Loron

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On Aug 21, 2008, at 9:09 PM, Vitaliy wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Thanks for the responses. I guess I'll just push through the rest of  
the PCB design, then.

-Pete


'[EE] How do you prototype mixed SMD and thru-hole?'
2008\11\19@093117 by Bob Axtell
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agreed. Years ago I arduously prototyped everything. But SMT
components are so hard to handle that simply going ahead with a design
is easier. But sometimes I will 'cheat" and
include some extra access pads....

--0Bob

On Thu, Aug 21, 2008 at 9:09 PM, Vitaliy <spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTspammaksimov.org> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\11\20@154141 by Vitaliy

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Bob Axtell wrote:
> Years ago I arduously prototyped everything. But SMT
> components are so hard to handle that simply going ahead with a design
> is easier. But sometimes I will 'cheat" and
> include some extra access pads....

Same here. :) We even leave the test points on some of our production boards
now, it's way better than having to solder tiny wires to the pins of an
SSOP.

Vitaliy

2008\11\21@100212 by Martin

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Vitaliy wrote:
> Bob Axtell wrote:
>> Years ago I arduously prototyped everything. But SMT
>> components are so hard to handle that simply going ahead with a design
>> is easier. But sometimes I will 'cheat" and
>> include some extra access pads....
>
> Same here. :) We even leave the test points on some of our production boards
> now, it's way better than having to solder tiny wires to the pins of an
> SSOP.
>
> Vitaliy
>

I prefer prototyping SMD now over TH because with a good pair of
tweezers and a decent soldering iron I can assemble a board much faster
than if I have to bend and cut leads.
-
Martin

2008\11\22@082520 by Alden Hart

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I also prefer to prototype SMT. I just use solder paste, tweezers and an
electric skillet (fry it). Usually some solder wick, as well. Good for
0805 and down to 0.050 pitch parts, not for much smaller. Also much
faster that thru-hole, in my experience.

Alden


Martin wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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