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'[EE] How an Optical Mouse works'
2005\04\05@192732 by Danny Decell

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I should have been  more clear about the second one being mechanical but
thought I would add it. I can't get over the fact that all that technology
(taking a photo, processing a pattern, DSP etc) is all going on in a mouse
now. Makes me really laugh because I was around when  ... well never mind :)

Yes, not only do they tell if the patterns moved, but in what direction it
moved. There must be some very interesting prcoessing going on there. With
these types of advances in technology we are not going to be ripping them
apart and playing with them on our workbench much longer.

{Original Message removed}

2005\04\05@201919 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Apr 5, 2005, at 4:27 PM, Danny Decell wrote:

>  I can't get over the fact that all that technology (taking a photo,
> processing a pattern, DSP etc) is all going on in a mouse now.

There was also a first generation optical mouse, circa 1983 or so,
that used a much simpler technology, but required a special mouse
pad to work.  They shipped with some of the early Sun workstations,
but the rather cool-looking mousepads had a tendency to walk away
on their own, as well as being relatively inconvenient and
uncomfortable.

BillW

2005\04\05@203725 by Mike Harrison

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On Tue, 5 Apr 2005 19:27:29 -0400, you wrote:

>I should have been  more clear about the second one being mechanical but
>thought I would add it. I can't get over the fact that all that technology
>(taking a photo, processing a pattern, DSP etc) is all going on in a mouse
>now. Makes me really laugh because I was around when  ... well never mind :)
>
>Yes, not only do they tell if the patterns moved, but in what direction it
>moved. There must be some very interesting prcoessing going on there. With
>these types of advances in technology we are not going to be ripping them
>apart and playing with them on our workbench much longer.
The sensors are made by Agilent - The datasheet is here :
http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/46713.pdf

2005\04\05@211328 by Mark Rages

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On Apr 5, 2005 7:42 PM, Mike Harrison <spam_OUTmikeTakeThisOuTspamwhitewing.co.uk> wrote:
> On Tue, 5 Apr 2005 19:27:29 -0400, you wrote:
>
> >I should have been  more clear about the second one being mechanical but
> >thought I would add it. I can't get over the fact that all that technology
> >(taking a photo, processing a pattern, DSP etc) is all going on in a mouse
> >now. Makes me really laugh because I was around when  ... well never mind :)
> >
> >Yes, not only do they tell if the patterns moved, but in what direction it
> >moved. There must be some very interesting prcoessing going on there. With
> >these types of advances in technology we are not going to be ripping them
> >apart and playing with them on our workbench much longer.
> The sensors are made by Agilent - The datasheet is here :
> http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/46713.pdf

Wow.

Has anybody made a robot out of an optical mouse yet?  At 400 dpi, you
could attach an ink pen and make a huge floor-plotter...

Maybe it's time to rip one apart and start playing with it on my workbench!

Regards.
Mark
markrages@gmail
--
You think that it is a secret, but it never has been one.
 - fortune cookie

2005\04\06@014925 by Robert Rolf

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William Chops Westfield wrote:
> On Apr 5, 2005, at 4:27 PM, Danny Decell wrote:
>
>>  I can't get over the fact that all that technology (taking a photo,
>> processing a pattern, DSP etc) is all going on in a mouse now.
>
>
> There was also a first generation optical mouse, circa 1983 or so,
> that used a much simpler technology, but required a special mouse
> pad to work.  They shipped with some of the early Sun workstations,
> but the rather cool-looking mousepads had a tendency to walk away
> on their own, as well as being relatively inconvenient and uncomfortable.

Not to mention that the needed printed pattern wore out with
much use, rendering the pad useless after 3 rotations (to get to
unworn area). It used IR and non-IR reflective inks, with
corresponding Red and IR LED's and gratings in the optical paths.
Think quadrature encoder where the stripes on the pad were
imaged onto the phototransistors in the mouse.

Robert

2005\04\06@075255 by olin_piclist

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Mark Rages wrote:
> Has anybody made a robot out of an optical mouse yet?  At 400 dpi, you
> could attach an ink pen and make a huge floor-plotter...

Not really.  The optical pattern method is not terribly accurate.  That's
fine for a mouse since the human is in the feedback loop and will move the
mouse until the cursor gets to the desired location.  For a plotter though,
the relative errors will accumulate and absolute position will quickly
become uncertain to the point of uselesness.


*****************************************************************
Embed Inc, embedded system specialists in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, http://www.embedinc.com

2005\04\06@091105 by Jake Anderson

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along a simmilar vein to the plotter idea
We want to make some kind of accurate tool tip
positioning device on our lathe, if you had the optical
sensor positioned on a surface with a known pattern on
it (grey coding or some such) you could get an absolute
position by scanning a line of pixels, and then get a
high resolution offset from that from knowing where the
edges are in reference to the center of the optical sensor.

any thaughts on this?

> {Original Message removed}

2005\04\06@102042 by Danny Decell

picon face
>> The sensors are made by Agilent - The datasheet is here :
>> http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/46713.pdf
>
> Wow.
>
> Has anybody made a robot out of an optical mouse yet?  At 400 dpi, you
> could attach an ink pen and make a huge floor-plotter...
>
> Maybe it's time to rip one apart and start playing with it on my
> workbench!

LOL I was thinking the same thing (playing with one of the chips that is)
when I looked at that datasheet. The robot idea is even better. I've got so
many modules stacked up now and notes all over my desk of new things I want
to try I can't keep up with it all :(   *crys*

I started a couple years ago putting chips I wanted to play with on little
boards. Even circuits I use all the time like a microcontrollers, keyboard
interfaces, displays, switches, LCD's, amplifiers, sensors etc. I've got a
collection of about 50 of them now and even starting to put some of them on
I2C bus. When I've had to put some new designs together for friends, I pull
out a bunch of modules, plug them together and start coding and playing.
It's turned into my own set of electronic Lego(tm) blocks :) hehe

2005\04\06@123157 by Bradley Ferguson

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On Apr 6, 2005 6:53 AM, Olin Lathrop <.....olin_piclistKILLspamspam@spam@embedinc.com> wrote:
> Mark Rages wrote:
> > Has anybody made a robot out of an optical mouse yet?  At 400 dpi, you
> > could attach an ink pen and make a huge floor-plotter...
>
> Not really.  The optical pattern method is not terribly accurate.  That's
> fine for a mouse since the human is in the feedback loop and will move the
> mouse until the cursor gets to the desired location.  For a plotter though,
> the relative errors will accumulate and absolute position will quickly
> become uncertain to the point of uselesness.

Ahh, but my dual optical mouse is much better than any of the single
optical mice of the same vintage (2 years old).  I imagine if you
combined the data from several sensors you could get much improved
positioning.  It would still be dead reckoning, so any errors--no
matter how small--would add up over time.  Still probably better than
counting wheel revolutions where you have slip and/or deformation of
the wheel.

I wonder if a different optical stage (lens and illumination) couldn't
be made to work at a much greater height so that it could travel over
an uneven surface.  This could be added to a remote control vehicle to
provide feedback for the steering, which might not always track
straight with no input due to backlash in the steering mechanism.

Also, I had trouble with the Farnell copy of the datasheet.  Here is
the location of the Agilent datasheet:
http://cp.literature.agilent.com/litweb/pdf/5988-8421EN.pdf

Bradley

2005\04\06@164847 by Andrew Warren

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Bradley Ferguson <piclistspamKILLspammit.edu> wrote:

> Here is the location of the Agilent datasheet:
> http://cp.literature.agilent.com/litweb/pdf/5988-8421EN.pdf

The brand-new sensors might be more interesting:
http://cp.literature.agilent.com/litweb/pdf/5989-1830EN.pdf

-Andy

=== Andrew Warren - .....fastfwdKILLspamspam.....ix.netcom.com

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