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'[EE] Help with boosting powersupply.'
2007\01\18@190037 by Tachyon

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Is anyone aware of an existing, or can one of you geniuses sketch out, a
power-supply circuit that meets the following specs?

- Input 10-15v DC  (Assume to be dirty, as source will be car
alternator, generator, car battery, solar panels, etc.)
- Output regulated 16v, 5a DC
- filtered output
- simple components, nothing exotic

I'd REALLY appreciate if anyone can help with this.
On a side note, I can see down the road needing to choose other output
voltages

2007\01\18@192043 by Bob Blick

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> Is anyone aware of an existing, or can one of you geniuses sketch out, a
> power-supply circuit that meets the following specs?
>
> - Input 10-15v DC  (Assume to be dirty, as source will be car
> alternator, generator, car battery, solar panels, etc.)
> - Output regulated 16v, 5a DC
> - filtered output
> - simple components, nothing exotic
>
> I'd REALLY appreciate if anyone can help with this.
> On a side note, I can see down the road needing to choose other output
> voltages

http://bobblick.com/techref/projects/mp3book/mp3book2/mp3book2.html

You could use the 12 volt portion of this power supply I designed. If you
can see what parts to remove to suit your application, then you are
probably able to build it. Note that you may not need the remote turn-on
either so you can leave those parts off.

Cheerful regards,

Bob


2007\01\18@204218 by Martin Klingensmith

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A boost converter would work.
Try this page:
<schmidt-walter.fbe.fh-darmstadt.de/smps_e/aww_smps_e.html>
I would shoot for 150kHz or so.
--
Martin K

Tachyon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2007\01\18@210011 by Micro Brix

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I think I remember seeing something like this from MFJ recently.

2007\01\19@043504 by Alan B. Pearce

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>- Input 10-15v DC  (Assume to be dirty, as source will be car
>alternator, generator, car battery, solar panels, etc.)
>- Output regulated 16v, 5a DC

Powering a laptop, are we?


2007\01\19@052050 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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>-----Original Message-----
>From: spam_OUTpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu]
>On Behalf Of Alan B. Pearce
>Sent: 19 January 2007 09:35
>To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
>Subject: Re: [EE] Help with boosting powersupply.
>
>
>>- Input 10-15v DC  (Assume to be dirty, as source will be car
>>alternator, generator, car battery, solar panels, etc.)
>>- Output regulated 16v, 5a DC
>
>Powering a laptop, are we?

I had the same thought.  You can buy universal laptop adapters designed to plug into cigaraette lighters in cars that have very simmilar specs e.g. http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=44736  Might be worth buying rather than building...

Regards

Mike


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2007\01\19@075121 by Russell McMahon

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>> - Input 10-15v DC  (Assume to be dirty, as source will be car
>> alternator, generator, car battery, solar panels, etc.)
>> - Output regulated 16v, 5a DC
>> - filtered output
>> - simple components, nothing exotic

> http://bobblick.com/techref/projects/mp3book/mp3book2/mp3book2.html

> You could use the 12 volt portion of this power supply I designed.
> If you
> can see what parts to remove to suit your application, then you are
> probably able to build it. Note that you may not need the remote
> turn-on
> either so you can leave those parts off.

Bob's solution has the advantage over the more normal boost converter
of having no DC output when off. Whether this matters depend son you
application. The boost converter connects Vin to Vout via the main
power diode. The series capacitor's ripple current rating may need
looking at. Bob can probably comment further on that.

Your main challenge here is the inductor and that's not terrible. But
be sure the inductor is properly* rated for the currents drawn. ** -
here properly means doesn't saturate much, doesn't get too too hot and
doesn't emit magic smoke).



       Russell



2007\01\19@102331 by Micro Brix

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On 1/19/07, Alan B. Pearce <A.B.PearcespamKILLspamrl.ac.uk> wrote:
>
> >- Input 10-15v DC  (Assume to be dirty, as source will be car
> >alternator, generator, car battery, solar panels, etc.)
> >- Output regulated 16v, 5a DC
>
> Powering a laptop, are we?


In my case, I was looking to charge a gel cell that runs some radio gear.
I didn't want the battery charged unless the car was running, so that once
the key was off, the radios would run till the gell cell ran down, but NOT
the vehicle battery.   It also dosen't suck to have better regulation.

2007\01\19@195024 by Bob Blick

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> In my case, I was looking to charge a gel cell that runs some radio gear.
> I didn't want the battery charged unless the car was running, so that once
> the key was off, the radios would run till the gell cell ran down, but NOT
> the vehicle battery.   It also dosen't suck to have better regulation.

Hi Dave(it is Dave, isn't it, just with a new handle?)

Why not just use a relay to connect the batteries whenever the voltage is
over  some preset voltage? I've seen this method used quite successfully
in commercial products.

Or you could use two back-to-back PMOSFETs if you didn't want to use a relay.

Cheerful regards,

Bob

2007\01\19@202658 by Micro Brix

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>
>
> Hi Dave(it is Dave, isn't it, just with a new handle?)


Not sure what's up, something tumbled in my gmail config I guess.

Why not just use a relay to connect the batteries whenever the voltage is
> over  some preset voltage? I've seen this method used quite successfully
> in commercial products.


How do you disconnect then?  If both batteries are connected, then the
voltage stays up till both are somewhat discharged.
I was also looking for it to perform regulation, so that my gel cell
wouldn't necessarily be charged by the comparatively rude and crude vehicle
charge system.

I was looking to have the charge shut down at 13V, and resume at say 13.5 on
the input side, and output regulated to the particular gel cells, including
temperature ideally.

2007\01\20@132400 by Bob Blick

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Micro Brix wrote:
> Why not just use a relay to connect the batteries whenever the voltage is
>> over  some preset voltage? I've seen this method used quite successfully
>> in commercial products.
>
> How do you disconnect then?  If both batteries are connected, then the
> voltage stays up till both are somewhat discharged.
> I was also looking for it to perform regulation, so that my gel cell
> wouldn't necessarily be charged by the comparatively rude and crude vehicle
> charge system.

After the car shuts off, it won't stay at 14-ish volts for very long, at
most a few seconds, and that won't hurt anything.

Agreed about the less-than-perfect charge algorithm of the car, but if
you only need 3 years service life on the gel cell, it's good enough.

I had a UPS made by Best Power, and the battery lasted 8 years. I tested
it every year, and was amazed to see it still could keep the test load
up for a decent amount of time. Especially when my Tripp-Lite UPS
regularly split its batteries open every two years.

Cheerful regards,

Bob

2007\01\20@135031 by Micro Brix

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>
>
> After the car shuts off, it won't stay at 14-ish volts for very long, at
> most a few seconds, and that won't hurt anything.


True, and if I used a voltage comparator I wouldn't have to worry about the
pull-in / drop out differential being too large, which it always is if the
contacts can pass any real current.

But I was also concerned about the charge side. These batteries aren't
designed for use in a car, and I want to compensate the charge system for
the temperatures involved.. -30 to 150F isn't an unreasonable span in this
environment.

2007\01\21@014559 by Steve Smith

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It's a silly thought but you might consider the method used to charge
caravan batteries. Using the ignition warning light to drive the coil of a
contactor (big relay). The signal is normally low when the alternator is
stopped and goes high when its running. When you turn off the ignition the
contactor drops out because the feed is taken from the switched +ve (it
needs two resistors and a transistor (tip121 or similar)

Simple but effective. I use this method to charge a NP100-12 100Ah sealed
block for helicopter starting battery its been in the van for 3 years infact
it came from the old van so its about 5 years old now.  

Regards

Steve


{Original Message removed}

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