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'[EE] Enclosure machining (CNC)'
2007\03\11@002825 by Forrest W Christian

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I'm going to be using some off-the shelf enclosures (hammond 1593K) for
my next couple of products.

I'm having a problem finding someone to either machine the existing end
panels or cut me new ones for a reasonable cost.   I'm talking 1-2K/year
at this point.  Qty/run depends on cost.   Mainly just need a square-ish
and 3 round  holes cut in one end panel.

So, I'm wondering either who everyone else uses for this - or - if
anyone has had any luck buying/building a smallish CNC router table or
mill to cut their own.

Other ideas would be welcome!  Thanks!

-forrest

2007\03\11@090912 by Jake Vickers

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Forrest W Christian wrote:
> I'm going to be using some off-the shelf enclosures (hammond 1593K) for
> my next couple of products.
>
> I'm having a problem finding someone to either machine the existing end
> panels or cut me new ones for a reasonable cost.   I'm talking 1-2K/year
> at this point.  Qty/run depends on cost.   Mainly just need a square-ish
> and 3 round  holes cut in one end panel.
>
> So, I'm wondering either who everyone else uses for this - or - if
> anyone has had any luck buying/building a smallish CNC router table or
> mill to cut their own.
>
> Other ideas would be welcome!  Thanks!
>  
I built a CNC mill to do some work for myself. Started as carvings, and
I've used it to cut 300+ proto boards for myself. I've done 20-25
enclosures for serial port holes and what not and been reasonably happy
with the results.
http://www.v2gnu.com/mill.jpg
This machine is current in pieces - I'm changing it to an R8 taper to
give me a wider range of tooling, and I'm also swapping out the 46oz
steppers for some 150oz's I bought to allow me to do more serious steel
work. Machine wasn't too terribly hard to build, but I'm also
mechanically inclined so that is a factor.
There's a few guys that sell plans to build your own, or you can buy a
cheap-o mill (most are good to .009 or so) and then purchase a
conversion kit to convert to CNC. Total cost to go this route would be
roughly $1300 or so, and then any 286 or better with a parallel port
will control it. I personally use my first Pentium computer I ever
bought to run my mill (yeah, I'm a pack-rat). I even added a 4th axis
and cut some gears to replace a worn out one in the speedometer for my
BMW bike.

2007\03\11@113746 by Dave Lag

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Jake Vickers wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Nice machine!

The Parker (80/20) pieces were selected for ease of initial adjustment?
(they look lonely by themselves :)

D

2007\03\11@121435 by Jake Vickers

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Dave Lag wrote:
>
> Nice machine!
>
> The Parker (80/20) pieces were selected for ease of initial adjustment?
> (they look lonely by themselves :)
>
>  
Thanks. The TSLOTS were used because they were what I had on hand at the
time, to be honest. They are really nice for fabricating this type of
project, though.
I built it pretty much out of scrap I had in the garage at the time. I
purchased the stepper controller and steppers as a kit from a guy online
(I can dig the link up if you want it), and then I purchased roughly
$250 worth of materials - mainly the large pieces of aluminum you see; I
almost never have anything that large that doesn't have a hole or
something in it from another project.... I was lucky enough to find the
Thompson shaft at a local hardware surplus store for $10 a bar (they
didn't know what they had!) and then I purchased the bearings from a
local supplier. It was a first go and I was happy with it. The revamped
version will have some improvements, such as the larger motors and a
standard tapering for the drive spindle (along with variable speed). I'm
also going to use T-rail to support the linear shafts and move them in
closer to the centers to allow me to support larger pieces of material
without flexing. This machine gave me 16"X16"X5.2" of workable space at
12 IPM. I've purchased some real lead screws and some more Thompson so I
should get a 18"X18"X9" with roughly 50 IPM out of the next incarnation.
And it'll have a wet bath so I can work more with plastics and metals.
Cuts a nice proto board though. And I get the copper clad sheets in a
20"X20" sheet, so since my typical proto board is 4"X3" I can cut
multiples in one pass.
Guess the point I was getting at is that a CNC machine can be had for a
reasonable price. Sure, I worked on a $250,000 Fanuc in the family
machine shop, but the average person can have a decent CNC machine in
their garage for the $1500 range. For some it's worth it (even for those
like me that just wanted to do it!), but for others it will still be
cheaper/easier to outsource it.

2007\03\11@133821 by Victor Fraenckel

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Go here to find out everything you need to know about CNC Machining.
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/index.php

There is even a forum for placing your RFQ:
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=74

HTH

Vic

*____________________________________________________________________________________________*

*Victor Fraenckel
KC2GUI
victorf ATSIGN windreader DOT com**
*


2007\03\11@175410 by Timothy J. Weber

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Forrest W Christian wrote:
> I'm going to be using some off-the shelf enclosures (hammond 1593K) for
> my next couple of products.
>
> I'm having a problem finding someone to either machine the existing end
> panels or cut me new ones for a reasonable cost.   I'm talking 1-2K/year
> at this point.  Qty/run depends on cost.   Mainly just need a square-ish
> and 3 round  holes cut in one end panel.
>
> So, I'm wondering either who everyone else uses for this - or - if
> anyone has had any luck buying/building a smallish CNC router table or
> mill to cut their own.
>
> Other ideas would be welcome!  Thanks!

Have you tried asking Hammond themselves for a quote for the
customization?  I just used them for a ~300-unit job doing just what
you're describing - well, actually just drills, no routing - and they
were great to work with.  They also did silk-screening and cementing on
an extra flange piece.  Very convenient for a small run where I didn't
want to get into custom enclosure design.
--
Timothy J. Weber
http://timothyweber.org

2007\03\12@053907 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I'm having a problem finding someone to either machine the existing end
>panels or cut me new ones for a reasonable cost.   I'm talking 1-2K/year
>at this point.  Qty/run depends on cost.   Mainly just need a square-ish
>and 3 round  holes cut in one end panel.

maybe you need to invest in something like a Versalaser ...

http://www.ulsinc.com/versalaser/

2007\03\12@061315 by Vasile Surducan

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On 3/11/07, Jake Vickers <spam_OUTjakeTakeThisOuTspamv2gnu.com> wrote:
> I built a CNC mill to do some work for myself. Started as carvings, and
> I've used it to cut 300+ proto boards for myself. I've done 20-25
> enclosures for serial port holes and what not and been reasonably happy
> with the results.
> http://www.v2gnu.com/mill.jpg

That's nice indeed ! Have a better resolution than 0.010" on X and Y axes ?

thax,
Vasile

2007\03\12@094132 by Jake Vickers

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Vasile Surducan wrote:
> On 3/11/07, Jake Vickers <.....jakeKILLspamspam@spam@v2gnu.com> wrote:
>  
>> I built a CNC mill to do some work for myself. Started as carvings, and
>> I've used it to cut 300+ proto boards for myself. I've done 20-25
>> enclosures for serial port holes and what not and been reasonably happy
>> with the results.
>> http://www.v2gnu.com/mill.jpg
>>    
>
>  That's nice indeed ! Have a better resolution than 0.010" on X and Y axes ?
>
>  
Yeah - after adjusting for the backlash, I get (average) 0.005" on the X
and Y. More than accurate enough for what I'm doing right now.

2007\03\12@150238 by Brian Kraut

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I have done a few thousand enclosures on manual milling machines over the
years.  I finally got a K2 CNC router a while ago and I would recommend one.
You can configure the machine and get pricing online at http://www.k2cnc.com.

I also do protype work and short run production for other people and would
be happy to give you a quote.  Email to me at brianspamKILLspamengalt.com.

Brian Kraut
Engineering Alternatives, Inc.
http://www.engalt.com

{Original Message removed}

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