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'[EE] Driving Power mosfet'
2011\09\13@151412 by xavierpereira

picon face

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/20793649/Transformercoupled.JPG Transformer Coupled
gate Drive dl.dropbox.com/u/20793649/Capacitvely%20Coupled%20Mosfet.JPG
Capacitively Coupled Gate Drive

Can Some help me to know the difference between a Capacitively Coupled Gate
Drive and Transformer cuoupled Gate Drive ?

I have to use the Transformer Coupled Gate Drive for My project But I cannot find one here in Bangkok

can I replace it with Capacitively Coupled Gate Drive  and what would be the
effect ?

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/20793649/Gate%20Driver.JPG My Gate Driver Circuit -- View this message in context: old.nabble.com/Driving-Power-mosfet-tp32458346p32458346.html
Sent from the PIC - [EE] mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

2011\09\13@185528 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
xavierpereira wrote:
> http://dl.dropbox.com/u/20793649/Transformercoupled.JPG Transformer Coupled
> gate Drive
> dl.dropbox.com/u/20793649/Capacitvely%20Coupled%20Mosfet.JPG
> Capacitively Coupled Gate Drive
>
>
> Can Some help me to know the difference between a Capacitively Coupled Gate
> Drive and Transformer cuoupled Gate Drive ?
>
> I have to use the Transformer Coupled Gate Drive for My project
> But I cannot find one here in Bangkok
>
> can I replace it with Capacitively Coupled Gate Drive  and what would be the
> effect ?
>
> http://dl.dropbox.com/u/20793649/Gate%20Driver.JPG My Gate Driver Circuit
>   A 1:1 transformer can work. A small common mode filter can be used as a 1:1 gate drive transformer.
if you need galvanic isolation, then capacitor coupling is no use.

2011\09\14@014606 by xavier

picon face
What do u mean by galvanic isolation?

lambs become Lions

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Watterson <spam_OUTmikeTakeThisOuTspamradioway.org>
Sender: .....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2011 23:55:15 To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.<piclistspamKILLspammit.edu>
Reply-To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <.....piclistKILLspamspam.....mit.edu>
Subject: Re: [EE] Driving Power mosfet

xavierpereira wrote:
{Quote hidden}

if you need galvanic isolation, then capacitor coupling is no use.

2011\09\15@053707 by cdb

flavicon
face
On Wed, 14 Sep 2011 05:44:06 +0000, xavier wrote:
:: What do u mean by galvanic isolation?

It means that that the input to your system is physically not connected to the output.

You might want this if you have mains AC on one part of your circuit but for safety reasons the output side mustn't be directly connected.
If your Pic is powered via a transformer (for example) then the dc side of the transformer is galvanicly isolated from the AC input side. If your Pic is power directly from the AC (using suitable voltage reducing techniques) the Pic would not be isolated form the 50/60 Hz mains and therefore if you were to touch it, you are in danger of giving yourself an electric shock (fatal possibly).

Apart from the above, you might also want to isolate a circuit if you are connecting it to a computer, if your circuit shorts out, it is less likely to damage your PC and of course the other way around, this type of galvanic isolation is often made using an opto-coupler. If you have a modem or a network card there will be a transformer that isolates the circuit from the outside world mainly in the case of the phone line to prevent telephone technicians getting a shock if someone's computer or router or modem suddenly had high voltage or mains voltage applied to it.

It can also (but probably not in your case) be used where equipment might have a voltage difference between grounds - this can happen when many pieces of equipment have to 'talk' to each other over great distances or between buildings like on a large industrial estate/site.

Colin --
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2011\09\15@060301 by Electron

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face
At 11.37 2011.09.15, you wrote:
>On Wed, 14 Sep 2011 05:44:06 +0000, xavier wrote:
>:: What do u mean by galvanic isolation?
>
>It means that that the input to your system is physically not connected to
>the output.
>
>You might want this if you have mains AC on one part of your circuit but
>for safety reasons the output side mustn't be directly connected.
>
>If your Pic is powered via a transformer (for example) then the dc side of
>the transformer is galvanicly isolated from the AC input side. If your Pic
>is power directly from the AC (using suitable voltage reducing techniques)
>the Pic would not be isolated form the 50/60 Hz mains and therefore if you
>were to touch it, you are in danger of giving yourself an electric shock
>(fatal possibly).

Would it happen even if one touches the lowered tension terminal, e.g. Vdd
pin of the PIC (+5V), assuming (this is important for me to specify) that
the Vss is connected to neutral, and not to the line..?

I don't want to use circuits without transformers, just trying to understand
the phenomen.


>It can also (but probably not in your case) be used where equipment might
>have a voltage difference between grounds - this can happen when many
>pieces of equipment have to 'talk' to each other over great distances or
>between buildings like on a large industrial estate/site.

Yup, this is very important also e.g. to avoid ground loops.

Cheers,
Mario


{Quote hidden}

>article.

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