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'[EE] DIP desoldering tool'
2007\04\23@235116 by Forrest W Christian

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I have a need to be able to rapidly desolder some DIP IC's for
replacement.  I've tried various methods and haven't happened onto a
method that actually works quickly.   I've tried solder wick, solder
suckers, desolder (vaccuum) irons, hot air bath, etc.  The best way I've
found so far is to snip off the bad IC and then clean up all the holes -
but that isn't all that fun since my clearance around the DIP isn't all
that large for snipping and cleanup of holes with a small dip lead left
in them isn't all that easy.  

I seem to recall back in the '80's when boards covered with DIP packages
were common a special iron to heat all of the pins of the package
simultaneously.   My google skills have failed me in finding one. My
thought is that this would liquify the solder around the dip and allow
me to yank it off of the board intact which would make cleanup for
replacement easier.

Mainly this is for rework/RMA.  This particular IC is external-interface
facing and tends to get blown out under some conditions.   I've started
socketing it, but really would prefer not to do so if I can figure out
how to rework this IC without it being such a pain - since this IC needs
some heat condition to the board, and the socket doesn't really help
conduction all that much.

Ideas or a source for the DIP package desoldering iron?

-forrest


2007\04\24@001315 by Vasile Surducan

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If DIPs are mounted in through plated holes then hot air removal is the best,
heating on component side and not on solder side. The pins must be
stright for this methode works.

Vasile


On 4/23/07, Forrest W Christian <spam_OUTforrestcTakeThisOuTspamimach.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\04\24@004557 by Richard Prosser

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Forrest,
You could try running a "blob" of solder down both sides of pins. If
you get enough solder in place then the thermal inertia is enough to
keep it molten while you pull the part (using something that will grip
it at the ends).. But you do need a bit of space each side and the
part is likely to be damaged and you can have a bit of a clean-up job
to do afterwards.

And it can pull  the PTH barrels out of the board if a pin sticks!!!


RP

On 24/04/07, Vasile Surducan <.....piclist9KILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2007\04\24@010223 by Mark Rages

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On 4/23/07, Richard Prosser <.....rhprosserKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:
> Forrest,
> You could try running a "blob" of solder down both sides of pins. If
> you get enough solder in place then the thermal inertia is enough to
> keep it molten while you pull the part (using something that will grip
> it at the ends).. But you do need a bit of space each side and the
> part is likely to be damaged and you can have a bit of a clean-up job
> to do afterwards.
>

This method works well.  To keep from damaging the board, try this variant:

Grip the part with a needle nose pliers (add rubber bands on the
handles so you can let go).  Flip the board over. Now attack the pins
with a row of solder on each side and brisk movement of the iron.
When all the solder melts at once, the chip drops out with the weight
of the pliers.  Clean holes by heating them up, then applying a puff
of compressed air via lungs and a small straw.  No need to clean the
holes to spotless perfection, just clear them and insert the new part.
Add flux, reflow, done.

Regards,
Mark
markrages@gmail
--
Mark Rages, Engineer
Midwest Telecine LLC
EraseMEmarkragesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmidwesttelecine.com

2007\04\24@010854 by Vasile Surducan

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On 4/23/07, Mark Rages <markragesspamspam_OUTgmail.com> wrote:
> On 4/23/07, Richard Prosser <@spam@rhprosserKILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:
> > Forrest,
> > You could try running a "blob" of solder down both sides of pins. If
> > you get enough solder in place then the thermal inertia is enough to
> > keep it molten while you pull the part (using something that will grip
> > it at the ends).. But you do need a bit of space each side and the
> > part is likely to be damaged and you can have a bit of a clean-up job
> > to do afterwards.
> >
>
> This method works well.

Imagine you have 100 boards, every board with 50 to 80 DIP packages,
every package with 16 to 40 pins... "Well" is a relative term.

2007\04\24@013221 by Forrest W Christian

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Vasile Surducan wrote:

>If DIPs are mounted in through plated holes then hot air removal is the best, heating on component side and not on solder side. The pins must be stright for this methode works.
>
Do you have a recommendation for "tip" type/size for this?   I've tried
this before but from the bottom, not from the top and only really
succeeded in scorching the pcb.

I'm assuming you use a pick or similar under the component to pry?

Does board preheating help as well?  (asking the SMD rework questions).

-forrest

2007\04\24@013935 by Forrest W Christian

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Vasile Surducan wrote:

>Imagine you have 100 boards, every board with 50 to 80 DIP packages,
>every package with 16 to 40 pins... "Well" is a relative term.
>  
>
You know the scenes in horror/scifi movies where everyone is running
from a building to get away from the creature inside?  That's the image
that the above description conjured up in my brain.

-forrest

2007\04\24@014722 by Mark Rages

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On 4/24/07, Vasile Surducan <KILLspampiclist9KILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:
>
> Imagine you have 100 boards, every board with 50 to 80 DIP packages,
> every package with 16 to 40 pins... "Well" is a relative term.

I'm imagining this.

I'm imagining tossing the boards in the trash.

Regards,
Mark
markrages@gmail
--
Mark Rages, Engineer
Midwest Telecine LLC
RemoveMEmarkragesTakeThisOuTspammidwesttelecine.com

2007\04\24@021847 by Nate Duehr

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On 4/23/07, Mark Rages <spamBeGonemarkragesspamBeGonespamgmail.com> wrote:
> On 4/24/07, Vasile Surducan <TakeThisOuTpiclist9EraseMEspamspam_OUTgmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Imagine you have 100 boards, every board with 50 to 80 DIP packages,
> > every package with 16 to 40 pins... "Well" is a relative term.
>
> I'm imagining this.
>
> I'm imagining tossing the boards in the trash.

And re-designing it using DIP sockets or some form of on-board
programming for the DIP's in all those positions (if they're
programmable components) for the next screw-up.  :-)

Nate

2007\04\24@024844 by Jinx

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> And re-designing it using DIP sockets

Is it possible to bend the DIP's leads and mount them SMT style ? A
lot lot easier to remove. Or even trim the leads so that they don't go
right through the board (assuming PTH)

As for the ones you've got, hot air gun (or carefully with a small butane
torch) on the back of the board. Can be a bit rough though, have to
watch for scorching. And losing tracks on the top side if pins hang on
to pads. A good method for SMT though, heat the board and bang on
the bench

2007\04\24@050804 by Dario Greggio

face picon face
Hi, I remember also using a "bath of tin", into which you placed (made
floating) the board, copper side.
The simultaneous heat did do well enough.
We used it to de-solder 41256 RAMs

--
Ciao, Dario

2007\04\24@075215 by Dan Smith

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On 24/04/07, Forrest W Christian <RemoveMEforrestcspamTakeThisOuTimach.com> wrote:
> Ideas or a source for the DIP package desoldering iron?

I've got a pair of Xytronic desoldering tweezers that are designed for
surface mount use but work well on DIP packages also.  I normally
bridge the DIP pins with extra solder, use the tweezer iron to remelt
it all and pull the package out with pliers.  It's much easier if you
use a vice to hold the PCB, otherwise it's a bit of a handful!

This is the iron I've got
<http://www.xytronic-usa.com/226&236_index.htm>

Dan

2007\04\24@092414 by David VanHorn

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In any removal operation, you have to decide what is most important to preserve.

Sometimes it's the board, sometimes the device, sometimes both.

Snipping the leads is perfectly valid, and probably the least stress to the PCB.
DIP heaters are another way to go, but of course you need a different
one for each package.
I use a pace micro for this, one lead at a time. If the PCB was
properly designed, the chips just fall out.  But, if you don't
maintain your pace, it will perform badly.
If you can't wick the holes clean, that's telling me that the PCB
design is a factor. Too small of a hole, or no thermal relief, and
there you are.
It's not always easy.

2007\04\24@125136 by Dwayne Reid

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At 09:51 PM 4/23/2007, Forrest W Christian wrote:
>I have a need to be able to rapidly desolder some DIP IC's for
>replacement.

The tip you are talking about is over-rated.  I had a couple (and
probably still do) but haven't used them in years.

The problem with them was the iron heating them (NOT heating
them).  Too much heat lost down the little wussy stem that connected
it to the iron's heating element.

What I'd suggest is that you visit the Metcal web-site and see what
they have to offer.  One thing that I *think* would work well is to
attach a set of spring-loaded pliers or needle-nose pliers to the end
of the chip, then flip the board over and use a set of Metcal Talon
tips wide enough to bridge the full length of the pins.  Flood the
pins with solder (enough to get good thermal contact with every pin),
wait a couple of seconds for the heat to make it through the full
length of the pins, then gently rock the chip out.  Gentle is the key
word here - you don't want to damage any of the plated through holes.

The reason I suggest the Talon is that it contains 2 heating elements
- one for each row of pins.

A similar technique might be even simpler: just use the Talon to heat
up the pins from the top side of the board, then grip the chip WITH
the Talon and rock it out.  Again, extra solder to ensure good
thermal transfer to every pin is necessary.

I've used the Talon to do this with 8-pin DIP packages and it
works.  Flooding the pins with solder to enhance thermal conductivity
was essential - but the whole process was FAST.  Didn't damage any
plating in the process.

Don't know how well it will work with longer / bigger packages - I
suppose I should try it.  Also don't know how well it will work with
leads firmly attached to ground or power planes - the only Talon tips
I have here right now are 600F tips (TAC-601 through TAC-604).  I do
know that 700F tips are available but I don't have any.

Note: I mention 'Flooding" the pins with solder when using the
Talon.  Flooding is a relative term here: add enough solder to ensure
good thermal contact but that's all.  NOT enough to bridge between
all the pins - that's simply too much.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <dwaynerEraseMEspam.....planet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

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2007\04\24@144026 by Dr Skip

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I haven't done this, but thought about doing it a few times:

Take a 4" length (approx) of 10ga copper wire (or suitable size to fit)
and insert it into the ends of a Weller 100w gun. Shape the wire so that
it has a long run, long enough to cover the pins on one side of the dip.
Heat until the side melts and pull one side off at a time. Shaping to do
2 sides may also be possible...

Just a thought....

-Skip


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