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'[EE] DC welder'
2004\06\09@150629 by Roland

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Hi

Has anyone had any experience with high frequency DC welding circuits.

I've often wanted to experiment with making a DC welder, single phase
in(220V local), but large ferrite cores are hard to get hold of. Then the
other day, at the scrapyard (favourite haunt), I came across the output
section of a small DC welder. The output panel dial showed up to 160A, but
I was amazed to see that the main HF?? transformer had metal laminates. The
size was approximately 70mm x 70mm.

I thought iron laminates max-ed out at about 1KHz, which would never yield
that conversion, unless they're using Silicon steel, but I don't know how
common that is.

Further searching points to the likelyhood that the transformer is iron
laminate, switched at about 400Hz.
Also, the transformer found had only one primary winding, ie not a
push-pull as I would imagine.

Any ideas?

Regards
Roland Jollivet


JeM Electric cc
PO Box 1460
Kloof
3640
Kwazulu Natal
South Africa
Tel: +27 31 7024412
Fax: +27 31 7011674
Cell: +27 83 255 6017
Email: spam_OUTenquiriesTakeThisOuTspamcaon.co.za

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2004\06\09@152253 by Paul James E.

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Roland,

All the DC welders I have ever seen were basically Motor/Generator type
units.    The only welders I have seen that use transformers were AC arc
welders.   They do have output currents of 160 Amps and more typically.
My dad used to have one that put out in excess of 200 amps.  It was a
Twentieth Century brand.  The current was adjusted by moving a lever on
the front panel of the machine.  This in turn moved the core in and out
of the transformer.   And obviously, it operated on 60 hertz AC.

                                                  Regards,

                                                    Jim



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2004\06\09@155041 by Randy Abernathy

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In a message dated 6/9/2004 3:07:54 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
jemelectricspamspam_OUTMWEB.CO.ZA writes:

Hi

Has anyone had any experience with high frequency DC welding  circuits.

I've often wanted to experiment with making a DC welder,  single phase
in(220V local), but large ferrite cores are hard to get hold  of. Then the
other day, at the scrapyard (favourite haunt), I came across  the output
section of a small DC welder. The output panel dial showed up to  160A, but
I was amazed to see that the main HF?? transformer had metal  laminates. The
size was approximately 70mm x 70mm.

I thought iron  laminates max-ed out at about 1KHz, which would never yield
that  conversion, unless they're using Silicon steel, but I don't know how
common  that is.

Further searching points to the likelyhood that the  transformer is iron
laminate, switched at about 400Hz.
Also, the  transformer found had only one primary winding, ie not a
push-pull as I  would imagine.

Any ideas?

Regards
Roland  Jollivet




Most of the DC welders I have seen are just that Direct Current, no
frequency involved.  There are two basic types, straight polarity and  reversed
polarity.  They are available as 220VAC input voltages right off  the shelf.  And,
the ones for home use, are usually priced around or  under $300.00 without a
gas conversion kit to use them as a Mig type.  Try  checking the Wholesale Tool
website  _Wholesale Tool Inc - Hand  Tools, Power Tools, Machine Tools, and
Shop Equipment._ (http://www.wttool.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc)   I am  assuming
you are talking about making a welder to weld metal.

Hope this helps, maybe you can get some information from one of the
manufactureres there.

Randy  Abernathy
4626 Old Stilesboro Road NW
Acworth, GA 30101-4066
Phone /  Fax: 770-974-5295
Cell: 678-772-4113
E-mail: @spam@Cnc002KILLspamspamaol.com

I  furnish technical support, repair, and other related services for your
industrial woodworking machinery. My background as Senior Service Engineer for
the SCMI Group for nearly fifteen years with factory training, combines with
my  extensive background in electronics, mechanics, pneumatics, electrical and
CNC  machinery to offer you needed support for your  machinery.

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2004\06\09@205925 by SM Ling

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My 10 year old microwave had become weak and grilling was bad, just bought a
new one, better features at half the old microwave price.

Welder seems to be a good project to try for the could-not-throw-away
microwave.

I got one from a brief google search.

http://www.dansworkshop.com/Homebuilt%20arc%20welder.shtml

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2004\06\10@131450 by jsand

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Hello Roland & PIC.ers,


>Date:    Wed, 9 Jun 2004 15:06:29 -0400

>From:    Roland <spamBeGonejemelectricspamBeGonespamMWEB.CO.ZA>
>Subject: [EE] DC welder
>
>Hi
>
>Has anyone had any experience with high frequency DC welding circuits.
>
>I've often wanted to experiment with making a DC welder, single phase
>in(220V local), but large ferrite cores are hard to get hold of. Then the
>

<snippo>

You might want to have a chat with Pat Ellis at Wits Technikon
TakeThisOuTpatellisEraseMEspamspam_OUTtwrinet.twr.ac.za

A couple of years ago he & some colleagues were building a
(pic controlled of course) welder using 240vac mains in,
scr switched outputs at 150+ Amp. or some hairy such.

The whole thing was the size & weight of a pc, no iron
in sight....


       best regards,   John

email from the desk of John Sanderson.
JS Controls, PO Box 1887, Boksburg 1460, Rep. of S. Africa.
Tel/Fax 011 893 4154,
Cell 082 741 6275,
web    http://www.jscontrols.co.za
Manufacturer & purveyor of laboratory force testing apparatus &
related products & services.

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