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'[EE] Counting Bytes on an Ethernet Line'
2010\03\08@115743 by Herbert Graf

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Hello all,

Have been researching my options and I want to make sure I haven't
missed something.

I want to build something that will count the number of bytes on an
Ethernet line. No interaction with the line or higher level monitoring
(i.e. packet sniffing), just a count.

Using a PC or PC type infrastructure isn't really an option, can the PIC
Ethernet ports be put into a mode where they just receive bytes and
count them?

Other options are using a CPLD/FPGA with appropriate phy but that starts
getting a little much.

Would prefer to support both 10BaseT and 100BaseT. Gigabit would be
grand, but probably not reasonable to expect.

Thanks for any suggestions!

TTYL

2010\03\08@123036 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

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Em 8/3/2010 13:56, Herbert Graf escreveu:
{Quote hidden}

You could put the PIC Ethernet interface in full-promiscuous mode and
add all the incoming packet lengths. The PIC Ethernet interface is only
10Mbps tough.

The new ENC24J600 is 100Mbps capable, but its SPI interface to the host
(MCU) is restricted to 12Mbps.

As long as you don't try to download all the packets to the PIC, you
could be able to just check their lengths and discard the packets right
away, not to overflow the receiving buffer.


Best regards,

Isaac
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2010\03\08@130333 by Alan B Pearce

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> The new ENC24J600 is 100Mbps capable, but its SPI interface to the host
> (MCU) is restricted to 12Mbps.


But it does have a parallel interface compatible with the PMP ...

2010\03\08@131955 by William \Chops\ Westfield

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On Mar 8, 2010, at 8:56 AM, Herbert Graf wrote:

> I want to build something that will count the number of bytes on an  
> Ethernet line.

I have a device someone gave me that measures ethernet traffic.  I'm  
pretty sure it consists entirely of analog electronics and does  
something along the lines of measuring the average voltage on the coax  
(it IS that old...)

Be aware that a passive device on a modern ethernet will probably  
receive ONLY the broadcast (and maybe multicast) packets from the  
"backbone."  Since the ethernet fabric tends to be switched, the  
packets that show up at a 10baseT connector are frequently only the  
packets that "need" to be received by that device.

BillW

2010\03\10@101555 by Herbert Graf

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On Mon, 2010-03-08 at 14:30 -0300, Isaac Marino Bavaresco wrote:
> You could put the PIC Ethernet interface in full-promiscuous mode and
> add all the incoming packet lengths. The PIC Ethernet interface is only
> 10Mbps tough.
>
> The new ENC24J600 is 100Mbps capable, but its SPI interface to the host
> (MCU) is restricted to 12Mbps.
>
> As long as you don't try to download all the packets to the PIC, you
> could be able to just check their lengths and discard the packets right
> away, not to overflow the receiving buffer.

Wow, that sounds pretty ideal, thanks for the pointer!

TTYL

2010\03\12@095605 by Justin Richards

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>
> so for monitoring a hub is used rather than a switch.  i wonder if hubs are
> still available.
>
> Be aware that a passive device on a modern ethernet will probably
> receive ONLY the broadcast (and maybe multicast) packets from the
> "backbone."  Since the ethernet fabric tends to be switched, the
> packets that show up at a 10baseT connector are frequently only the
> packets that "need" to be received by that device.
>
> BillW
>
> -

2010\03\12@103241 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

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Some (most?) Ethernet switches can be configured to set a "monitor
port", where all the traffic for all the other ports are forwarded to
the monitoring port.

Even if your switch hasn't this capability, you can do an ARP table
attack, where you first send lots of fake ARP packets with different MAC
addresses until the switch routing table overflows, then the switch
stops routing and start acting as a simple Ethernet hub, forwarding all
the packets to all the ports.


Best  regards,

Isaac


Em 12/3/2010 11:56, Justin Richards escreveu:
{Quote hidden}

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