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'[EE] Cheap E-Ink hacking kit?'
2008\07\22@184357 by piclist

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I just read this...

http://www.informationweek.com/news/internet/ebusiness/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=209400613

It says that Esquire magazine will publish their 75th anniversary issue
that will contain e-ink on the front and back covers.  No word on how
large the displays will be, nor the price of the magazine.. but it might
be worth keeping an eye on for a cheap (hackable?) display.

--
Ian Smith
http://www.ian.org

2008\07\22@195658 by Marc Nicholas

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8x8 pixels ;)

But, if they're anything bigger, that'll be pretty amazing. I guess it
also makes it the first magazine to have a battery?

-marc



On 7/22/08, spam_OUTpiclistTakeThisOuTspamian.org <.....piclistKILLspamspam@spam@ian.org> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\07\22@204725 by Bob Blick

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I'd love it to be gobs of programmable pixels although it could be as
simple as printed images cycling on and off.

But it's definitely a step in the right direction, I look forward to it.
And I have a subscription to Esquire already :)

Hopefully it'll survive the postal service.

Cheerful regards,

Bob


On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 18:43:23 -0400 (EDT), piclistspamKILLspamian.org said:
> I just read this...
>
> www.informationweek.com/news/internet/ebusiness/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=209400613
>
> It says that Esquire magazine will publish their 75th anniversary issue
> that will contain e-ink on the front and back covers.  No word on how
> large the displays will be, nor the price of the magazine.. but it might
> be worth keeping an eye on for a cheap (hackable?) display.

--
http://www.fastmail.fm - mmm... Fastmail...

2008\07\22@225105 by Dr Skip

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Bob Blick wrote:
> But it's definitely a step in the right direction, I look forward to it.
> And I have a subscription to Esquire already :)



I'd disagree. E-books, and its sibling e-ink, facilitate many more mechanisms
for holding buyers of such media ransom. Books (or magazines) that can turn
themselves off after n number of readings, pay per read, etc. Then there's the
always inevitable future format issues, compatibility, loss by malfunction, and
so on. We take books for granted. I've been lucky enough to collect thousands
of _real_ books from the past 100+ years and it's a real joy to discover
anything from an old art technique that got 'lost' to engineering methods over
the years or you name it. All the way to current books. I shudder to think what
they would be if all digital (one day). Almost none would work - device age,
battery leakage, not being able to phone home to get permission to let me read
it again (maybe the author died or the company went out of business). Lots of
failure modes, not to mention compatibility with data (or comm) formats
spanning 100 yrs+.

I can see a future where greed and technology provide the way to return to
essentially closed guild type knowledge protection. Printed books always share
what's inside. E-media does not have to, unless you meet the demands. Combine
that with the general trend towards increasing specialization and they
reinforce each other. Look at the greed and lack of sensibility displayed in
software patents under the IP banner... Pay per use makes VCs drool. I've seen
it. It will happen. You may not suffer from it, but your kids or grandkids
will. You would be surprised how many silly, existing software techniques have
been patented already. If you use it personally, fine, but if you charge for
it... A lot isn't enforced because of the resources needed to investigate
everything with software in it. Essentially, we fly under their radar. If there
was a way to require payment every time you used a pointer in code, or a for
loop, it would be enforced. E-books offer that enforcement with another whole
layer of options for the publisher that have never been envisioned.

Surprisingly little world knowledge needs to be dynamically updated to be
useful too.

Even the internet will suffer from it. So much is free because the mechanisms
aren't there to handle the transactions yet. I'm seeing a lot of work on
micro-payment structures. The convergence of micropayments, universal wireless,
and perhaps cloud computing will make it happen. We also take a lot of access
to cross-discipline knowledge for granted. It's out there, in books and on the
net today. What if you had to pay to get each little bit beforehand? Now it's
an economic decision to proceed, and unless you're well off, self education,
especially outside what's needed for 'personal reinvestment', goes away.

Look at DRM, Macrovision/DVD protection, the mechanisms in digital tv to limit
viewing and recording, et al, to see where the interest is. If there were a
technology that would allow document content to be displayed, but not copied,
printed, or screen-shot, it would be embraced in a flash (no pun intended).
Hacking won't be the answer all the time, either.

I wish, as EEs, that we could say "whoa Tex, just slow down there". It's like
facilitating the development of a really fast first car and focusing on the
engine. Eventually, when it gets sold en masse, one sees that brakes are
necessary and that pushing speed, trust, and power in such a device may not
have been the safest thing to do...

And then there's the fragility of it all. One micro EM pulse device in the
library and its knowledge and holdings are gone...

Sorry, this gets me worked up... And paper saving (in case it comes up) isn't a
real issue with books. Paper is a renewable resource. It offers unique
benefits, as mentioned. If paper were the issue, then there would be real
effort at reducing printing from PCs, which have multiplied paper usage since
they came about. The motivation, and this is directly from the investors
themselves who are investing in these technologies, is only about incremental
revenue and recurring revenue, not saving paper. They are quick to point out
that that angle will certainly be mentioned, to cover as many markets as
possible though...




2008\07\22@232607 by cdb

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Umm, can't include all that you said there Dr Skip,

But if you think about it, even with paper technology, there are
surfaces and inks that could be used that fade or disintegrate over
time. The fact apart from entertainment gimmicks no
manufacturer/publisher has used this concept in the market place
doesn't negate the fact that it is feasibly possible,

Books also age, especially if not kept under appropriate conditions. I
have some books from the 60's (and an old 1887 pocket encyclopedia,
Australia apparently was a country of sheep with about 13,000 people)
which have 'yellowed, pages have become thin - this equates to digital
technology failing.

Does your company, 'lock' any PDF's that it produces, or Word and
Excel documents?

It behoves us to keep vigilant on the concerns that you raise, so that
in the round, most companies would think long and hard before going
that way with books.

Colin
--
cdb, .....colinKILLspamspam.....btech-online.co.uk on 23/07/2008

Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk  

Hosted by:  http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=7988359

Friendship multiplies the good of life and divides the evil.
Baltasar Gracian





2008\07\23@040608 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I wish, as EEs, that we could say "whoa Tex, just slow down there".

Trouble is, if we did that, we would be doing ourselves out of a job.

2008\07\23@113322 by Bob Blick

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On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 22:50:28 -0400, "Dr Skip" <EraseMEdrskipspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> said:
>
>
> Bob Blick wrote:
>  > But it's definitely a step in the right direction, I look forward to it.
>  > And I have a subscription to Esquire already :)
>
>
>
> I'd disagree. E-books, and its sibling e-ink, facilitate many more
> mechanisms
> for holding buyers of such media ransom.

True that sounds absolutely horrible.

I was looking forward to flexible low power displays that are cheap
enough to be considered disposable.

Cheerful regards,

Bob

--
http://www.fastmail.fm - And now for something completely different…

2008\07\23@140350 by Martin

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Bob Blick wrote:

>
> I was looking forward to flexible low power displays that are cheap
> enough to be considered disposable.
>
> Cheerful regards,
>
> Bob
>

As am I. There's no use in keeping newspapers, but books I could see
always keeping.
The e-ink displays are really amazing when you realize you can actually
read it in the sunlight.

-
Martin

2008\07\24@111303 by Alan B. Pearce

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>It says that Esquire magazine will publish their 75th anniversary
>issue that will contain e-ink on the front and back covers.  No
>word on how large the displays will be, nor the price of the
>magazine.. but it might be worth keeping an eye on for a cheap
>(hackable?) display.

Have a look at the August 2008 issue of Linux Journal, where someone has
hooked an E-Ink to a Gumstix.

http://www.linuxjournal.com/issue/172

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