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'[EE] Can a USB host be implemented using an 8 bit '
2005\01\05@035925 by Pang

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Hi all,

I am thinking of implementing an USB host on a data
logging device and are looking at various method of
doing it. My final intention is to attach a pen drive
( which are cheaply and readily available ) to the
data logging device and remove it after a month and
copy whatever data stored in the pen drive to a pc.

>From information gathered on the net, it seems that
most USB host are implemented on higher end micro
processor. I intend to build the USB 1.1 host that
will only access pen drive. I understand that i also
have to write the interface for the FAT32. Any
suggestions or ideas or valuable links?

Thanks.

Pang

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2005\01\05@062155 by Russell McMahon

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face
> I am thinking of implementing an USB host on a data
> logging device and are looking at various method of
> doing it. My final intention is to attach a pen drive
> ( which are cheaply and readily available ) to the
> data logging device and remove it after a month and
> copy whatever data stored in the pen drive to a pc.
>
>>From information gathered on the net, it seems that
> most USB host are implemented on higher end micro
> processor. I intend to build the USB 1.1 host that
> will only access pen drive. I understand that i also
> have to write the interface for the FAT32. Any
> suggestions or ideas or valuable links?

Google for "on the go" and Philips. They have several USB controllers
which allow easy slave / host / otg operation.
OTG is effectively what you want. Philips provide referenc ecode to
get you going with almost all the complexity in the IC. I had a quick
look at some sample code a while ago and it looked extremely easy to
get going. No doubt a full design has complexity but most fot he USB
details are invisible to you. Philips also do evaluation kits.


   http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/markets/connectivity/wired/usb/index.html

On The Go controllers

       http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/markets/connectivity/wired/usb/products/

One example

       http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/cgi-bin/pldb/pip/isp1362.html

General description

The ISP1362 is a single-chip Universal Serial Bus (USB) On-The-Go
(OTG) controller integrated with the advanced Philips Slave Host
Controller (PSHC) and the Philips ISP1181B Device Controller (DC). The
USB OTG controller is compliant with On-The-Go Supplement to the USB
2.0 Specification Rev. 1.0a. The host and device controllers are
compliant with Universal Serial Bus Specification Rev. 2.0, supporting
data transfer at full-speed (12 Mbit/s) and low-speed (1.5 Mbit/s).

The ISP1362 has two USB ports: port 1 and port 2. Port 1 can be
hardware configured to function as a downstream port, an upstream port
or an OTG port whereas port 2 can only be used as a downstream port.
The OTG port can switch roles from host to peripheral, or from
peripheral to host. The OTG port can become a host through the Host
Negotiation Protocol (HNP) as specified in the OTG supplement.

A USB product with OTG capability can function either as a host or as
a peripheral. For instance, with this dual-role capability, a Personal
Computer (PC) peripheral such as a printer may switch roles from a
peripheral to a host for connecting to a digital camera so that the
printer can print pictures taken by the camera without using a PC.
When a USB product with OTG capability is inactive, the USB interface
is turned off. This feature has made OTG a technology well-suited for
use in portable devices?such as, Personal Digital Assistant (PDA),
Digital Still Camera (DSC) and mobile phone?in which power consumption
is a concern. The ISP1362 is an OTG controller designed to perform
such functions.



       Russell McMahon

2005\01\05@063338 by Lee Jones

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face
> I am thinking of implementing an USB host on a data
> logging device and are looking at various method of
> doing it. My final intention is to attach a pen drive
> ( which are cheaply and readily available ) to the
> data logging device and remove it after a month and
> copy whatever data stored in the pen drive to a pc.

> From information gathered on the net, it seems that
> most USB host are implemented on higher end micro
> processor. I intend to build the USB 1.1 host that
> will only access pen drive.

Take a look at the Cypress SL811HS chip.  Provides USB
host interface and hooks fairly easily to a PIC CPU.

                                               Lee Jones

2005\01\05@071225 by Bob Axtell

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Most people do this by pre-recording a single long file onto the
flash drive, then simply writing straight forward without considering
the FAT structure.

There are not very many host chips. Cypress Semi has a couple
that work OK.

Its not that hard.

--Bob

Pang wrote:

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2005\01\05@081422 by Bob Ammerman

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Pang" <.....mailtopangKILLspamspam@spam@yahoo.com>
To: <piclistspamKILLspammit.edu>
Cc: <.....mailtopangKILLspamspam.....yahoo.com>
Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2005 3:59 AM
Subject: [EE] Can a USB host be implemented using an 8 bit uC?


{Quote hidden}

Yes, forget the idea of using USB. Use a SD or MMC card (like used in
cameras) which can be interfaced using ordinary SPI even in a small micro.
Then get a card reader for the PC.

IIRC, there are projects with a available source code on the net using these
cards and a FAT file system.

This will greatly reduce the complexity of your project.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems


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