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'[EE] CVS guru required'
2007\05\24@060715 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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A colleague has tried to check in some changes to a project, and it's all gone horribly wrong.  The lastet revision of the project is now effectively null, any attempt to check out the latest revision of any of the files does nothing, Tortoise CVS just returns with no file being created.  All previous revisions are intact however and can be checked out.

Is it possible to effectively delete the last revision of every file affected?  If so how do I do this via the CVS command line (I'm guessing this won't be possible through the Tortoise interface)?  I have inhereted ownership of this CVS repositry due to the previous owner leaving, but I'm not exactly up to speed on the admin side of things yet so any advice would be appreciated.

Regards

Mike

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2007\05\24@072302 by Rolf

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Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Not a CVS guru, but I know something that makes looking at CVS a whole
lot easier.....

Use Eclipse... I know it is a huge download, but it has the "CVS
perspective" which allows you to browse the CVS Repository, see what
branches there are, and what revisions there are. You don;t need to use
the Java stuff to take advantage of the CVS stuff.

http://eclipse.org

I have found that tools like tortoiseCVS are useful, but do not give a
very good idea of what the repository actually looks like, just what the
checked out code looks like

Have a look at
http://www.cs.umd.edu/class/sum2005/cmsc131/EclipseTutorial/cvs.html for
some help.

You may have to decide whether it is worth learning a new way to do
things .... ;-)

For what it's worth, I imagine that there has been a branch, or merge
gone wrong.

Rolf

2007\05\24@074414 by Stephen R Phillips

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--- Michael Rigby-Jones <spam_OUTMichael.Rigby-JonesTakeThisOuTspambookham.com> wrote:

> A colleague has tried to check in some changes to a project, and it's
> all gone horribly wrong.  The lastet revision of the project is now
> effectively null, any attempt to check out the latest revision of any
> of the files does nothing, Tortoise CVS just returns with no file
> being created.  All previous revisions are intact however and can be
> checked out.
>
> Is it possible to effectively delete the last revision of every file
> affected?  If so how do I do this via the CVS command line (I'm
> guessing this won't be possible through the Tortoise interface)?  I
> have inhereted ownership of this CVS repositry due to the previous
> owner leaving, but I'm not exactly up to speed on the admin side of
> things yet so any advice would be appreciated.
>
> Regards
>
> Mike
>
You probably should not be use CVS. Although this is after the fact.
CVS is entirely dependent on the user being 100% competent. This as you
know can be a highly improbable (LOL) method of ensuring things work
right. CVS as a consequence REQUIRES frequent (see DAILY) backup before
allowing commits.  SVN gives significant improvements over CVS with the
added benefit of not giving the ability to NUKE an entire repository by
one individual uploading changes.  It keeps track of revisions for each
file (not just the whole committal etc.)

As for the repository I suggest if you can get someone with shell
access to back up the entire site to do so ASAP.  You will then need to
pick through the pieces and try and make sense of it.  That is the only
suggestion I can make.   As I said unfortunately CVS affords little
protection when it comes to people making revisions, of them nuking the
entire file set, and making the entire repository useless.  This has
happened to some big projects on source forge hence source forge now
recommends SVN use only.

Stephen

Stephen R. Phillips was here
Please be advised what was said may be absolutely wrong, and hereby this disclaimer follows.  I reserve the right to be wrong and admit it in front of the entire world.



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2007\05\24@081116 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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{Quote hidden}

The CVS repository is on a server which has daily backups. Unfortunately restoring a backup prior to this event isn't a great idea as a fair bit of stuff has been checked in since then (I went on vacation for a week on the day it happened).

I have no choice in using or not using CVS, it's an established repositry from another (off-site) group, most of whome (including administrator) have been made redundant.  I have been landed with most of the projects and admin of the CVS repositry, despite explaingin my lack of experience with CVS.  I know it's a sharp learning curve, but I don't have much choice at this stage.  The user who's checkin went wrong was apparently trying to create branch, but it seems he has less experience than I do.


>As for the repository I suggest if you can get someone with
>shell access to back up the entire site to do so ASAP.  You
>will then need to pick through the pieces and try and make
>sense of it.  That is the only
>suggestion I can make.   As I said unfortunately CVS affords little
>protection when it comes to people making revisions, of them
>nuking the entire file set, and making the entire repository
>useless.  This has happened to some big projects on source
>forge hence source forge now recommends SVN use only.

I have full access to the server and can browse the repository etc.  Before he left the previous admin showed me a collection of zipped up versions of the repository that he used to make fairly regulary as a double back-up.

Regards

Mike

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2007\05\24@084953 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Stephen R Phillips wrote:

> CVS as a consequence REQUIRES frequent (see DAILY) backup before
> allowing commits.  

I think every repository that is in daily use should be backed up daily, if
the data in it is any worth :)  But what makes you think that cvs
specifically requires that?

> SVN gives significant improvements over CVS with the added benefit of not
> giving the ability to NUKE an entire repository by one individual
> uploading changes.  

Can you please show an example of how an individual (I assume user, not
admin) can nuke an entire repository by uploading (I assume committing)
changes?

> It keeps track of revisions for each file (not just the whole committal
> etc.)

This is exactly what cvs(nt) does. What makes you think it doesn't?

> You will then need to pick through the pieces and try and make sense of
> it.  That is the only suggestion I can make.   As I said unfortunately
> CVS affords little protection when it comes to people making revisions,
> of them nuking the entire file set, and making the entire repository
> useless.  

Is this FUD or fact?

FWIW, I run a cvsnt repository for many years, and I don't see how any of
this is possible with cvs(nt). There are some shortcomings in cvs that have
been solved in cvsnt (for example, any user who can commit revisions in a
cvs repository can also delete tags), but nothing of this makes any file
data disappear. (Unless, of course, you make all your users admins.) AFAIK,
svn doesn't have any detailed access control mechanisms either.

Gerhard

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