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'[EE] Bread boards for high temperature - 85C, 185F'
2010\05\03@150722 by Adam Field

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face
Does anyone have experience with breadboard type prototyping boards at
elevated temperatures? I ran a test with an unknown brand board I had
and it curled up into a U shape, but still works okay electrically.
This was at 85 degrees C, 185 degrees F.

Unfortunately I haven't been able to find data on temperature limits
from manufacturer. Global Specialties brand available at Mouser is
made from ABS plastic. From limited research, ABS plastic is only good
to 60C. Does anyone know of breadboards that are made from a different
plastic?

2010\05\03@152753 by Sean Breheny

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Yes, I have experience: I recently discarded a breadboard which had
become heavily distorted and yellowed because of a power transistor
which was mounted on it and became very hot. :) Somehow I think that's
not the kind of experience you are looking for!

No, I don't know of any which are made out of a high temp plastic.
What is the application? It seems as though any application which
involves elevated temperatures would best be handled with a PCB
(possibly a protoboard type PCB or a "dead-bug"/ugly/Manhattan style
solder connections).

Sean


On Mon, May 3, 2010 at 3:07 PM, Adam Field <spam_OUTadamTakeThisOuTspambadtech.org> wrote:
> Does anyone have experience with breadboard type prototyping boards at
> elevated temperatures? I ran a test with an unknown brand board I had
> and it curled up into a U shape, but still works okay electrically.
> This was at 85 degrees C, 185 degrees F.
>
> Unfortunately I haven't been able to find data on temperature limits
> from manufacturer. Global Specialties brand available at Mouser is
> made from ABS plastic. From limited research, ABS plastic is only good
> to 60C. Does anyone know of breadboards that are made from a different
> plastic?
> -

2010\05\03@160241 by Adam Field

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face
> Yes, I have experience: I recently discarded a breadboard which had
> become heavily distorted and yellowed because of a power transistor
> which was mounted on it and became very hot. :) Somehow I think that's
> not the kind of experience you are looking for!

No, but it was a valid test, even if the temperature was "uncalibrated."
> No, I don't know of any which are made out of a high temp plastic.
> What is the application? It seems as though any application which
> involves elevated temperatures would best be handled with a PCB
> (possibly a protoboard type PCB or a "dead-bug"/ugly/Manhattan style
> solder connections).

This is for capacitor testing of small boxed film parts. The reason we
aren't using solder is because we are measuring specs with our LCR
bridge up to 100KHz which needs the parts in a special fixture.

A bread board is nice for a number of reasons, one of them being
pre-made. I may have to go with a PCB and either socket pins or IC
sockets spaced appropriately.

2010\05\03@174735 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
Adam Field wrote:
>
> This is for capacitor testing of small boxed film parts. The reason we
> aren't using solder is because we are measuring specs with our LCR
> bridge up to 100KHz which needs the parts in a special fixture.
>
> A bread board is nice for a number of reasons, one of them being
> pre-made. I may have to go with a PCB and either socket pins or IC
> sockets spaced appropriately.
>  
I had to test ceramic capacitors at 125 C and 50KV once. I used two
insulating pillars on the metal frame, stacked, and springy clips to
hold the caps.

I think about 100 caps (10 rows of 10 col) per tray.

Discharging afterwards was problematic. Due to Piezo effect you had to
leave discharge resistor connected for many minutes.

They where also tested at -25 or -50, I can't remember. The oven was
cycled from 125 C by to -xx C by blasting in CO2. The oven and CO2 valve
controlled by timer / thermostat I cobbled together.


I remember I had difficulty getting suitable insulating pillars.

2010\05\03@212200 by Mike Hord

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Adafruit has some clear breadboards...I don't know what they're
made of but it may be acrylic which would be a higher temp
plastic.

Mike H.

On Mon, May 3, 2010 at 2:07 PM, Adam Field <.....adamKILLspamspam@spam@badtech.org> wrote:

> Does anyone have experience with breadboard type prototyping boards at
> elevated temperatures? I ran a test with an unknown brand board I had
> and it curled up into a U shape, but still works okay electrically.
> This was at 85 degrees C, 185 degrees F.
>
> Unfortunately I haven't been able to find data on temperature limits
> from manufacturer. Global Specialties brand available at Mouser is
> made from ABS plastic. From limited research, ABS plastic is only good
> to 60C. Does anyone know of breadboards that are made from a different
> plastic?
> -

2010\05\04@063459 by Peter

picon face
You may want to take a look at tube(valve) sockets. They can be mounted on a
small aluminum chassis and some are good for well over 250 deg C (ceramic), but
even plastic and bakelite will take well over 100 degrees C. The subminiature
tube series have pins of comparable diameter with those of today's leaded
components. High temperature relay sockets also exist, some have quite thin pins.

-- Peter

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