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'[EE] Asking for pointers about NFC Near Field Comm'
2011\01\14@202047 by RussellMc

face picon face
> #3  I want to use NFC for remote control purposes and data acquisition.  I intend to design an NFC reader and some different slave units.  I would like to be compatible with what is coming out in the smart phone area.  I would prefer to use the simplest protocol possible.  Any suggestions on protocol and configuration ?
>
> #4  It has been suggested that I could roll my own RF circuitry. I wonder if it would be better to find a chip for this ( NXP maybe ? ) or roll my own ?

FWIW:  Note that NFC is not RF, by definition.

If you want low cost and easy startup you can start by "rolling your
own with a transmitter using  modulated or switched sine wave of
suitable frequency, driving a resonant inductor or loop. Receiver is a
tuned circuit and a half wave diode detector. Start with two "pot
core" or U core or whatever - drive one, receive with other.

cm's of range is easy. More to much more is easy with more open tx loop toplogy.

MIT managed 'across a room" at 60 Watts at ~- 50% efficiency afair.

IPT robotic powering people achieve kWs to 10's of kW at highish
efficiencies across cms.

I've had  dozens of "stations"  with power transfers of say 1 - 10
Watt/station and bidirectional signalling at 100's of kbps (AFAIR)
with say 10 mm clearance. TX loop was standard mains "tps" wiring (100
mm 2 wire loop) with ferrite U cores placed on or near insulated
conductors as and where required.

Resonance of tx and rx is a major "secret"

Having at least one inductor have a large spatially distributed field
is another.

FWIW, Jodrell Bank Radio telescope near field extends to beyond
atmosphere - makes RF testing difficult [tm]. May set a record for NFC
though :-).



           Russell McMahon

2011\01\15@115217 by N. T.

picon face
YES NOPE9 wrote:
> #3  I want to use NFC for remote control purposes and data
> acquisition. I intend to design an NFC reader and some different
> slave units.  I would like to be compatible with what is coming
> out in the smart phone area.

Probably, for data acquisition you should wait for Intel Light Peak on mobiles.
www.zdnet.co.uk/reviews/adapters/2010/08/05/intel-light-peak-a-tech-guide-40089748/
"Sony and Nokia would like to work with us on a global standard for
mobile computers and smartphones", Ziller confirms. Toshiba is
positive about Light Peak too: "I think it could supersede USB 3.0
very quickly", notebook product manager Ken Chan told ZDNet UK.
However, Light Peak will take longer to appear in phones, warns
Intel's Ziller: "the solution we have today wouldn't fit into a phone,
but we're on the path to miniaturise in next few years".

2011\01\17@094219 by Gordon Downie

flavicon
On Mon, Jan 17, 2011 at 1:44 PM, Herbert Graf <spam_OUThkgrafTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
> Do you have a reference for this? If the POS terminal is communicating
> with the bank to confirm the transaction is done, why wouldn't they
> first have the bank confirm the PIN with the terminal, the two are
> already communicating?

> I'm sorry, but it just doesn't track, it sounds more like an urban
> legend to me.

In small shops they are often dial up (1 till / few transactions) .
The PIN is encoded/encrypted on the Chip and on the Magnetic strip. So
the terminal can verify the PIN. Dialup is used to call home to verify
the card / transaction. This is true in my sister's Cafe.

Depending on the Bank/Card machine, card type, transaction amount and
the card issuer they may not call home to verify a card if the PIN is
ok. So if the amount is small, card is from a trusted issuer and the
PIN is ok. That seams also to allow backup if there is a
communications failure.

http://www.emvx.co.uk/flow_chart.aspx

Gordo

2011\01\26@114646 by N. T.

picon face
YES NOPE9 wrote:
> #3  I want to use NFC for remote control purposes and data acquisition.  I intend to design an NFC reader and some different slave units.  I would like to be compatible with what is coming out in the smart phone area.  I would prefer to use the simplest protocol possible.  Any suggestions on protocol and configuration ?
>
> #4  It has been suggested that I could roll my own RF circuitry. I wonder if it would be better to find a chip for this ( NXP maybe ? ) or roll my own ?

Texas maybe

CC2567-PAN1327  ANT plus Bluetooth dual-mode, single-chip module with
integrated antenna

http://focus.ti.com/docs/prod/folders/print/cc2567-pan1327.html?DCMP=wtbu_ecs_cc2567_pan1327&HQS=EvaluationTools+PR+cc2567-pan1327-pf

Description
The CC2567-PAN1327/17 is the first dual-mode, ANT and Bluetooth
solution in the market. This solution is a highly-integrated class 2
HCI module with increased output power capabilities offered by
Panasonic using TI’s CC2567 ANT+ and Bluetooth 2.1 + Enhanced Data
Rate (EDR) dual-mode transceiver. Based on TI’s 7th generation
Bluetooth technology, the solution provides best-in-class Bluetooth RF
performance of +10 dBm typical Tx power and -93 dBm typical receiver
sensitivity. The CC2567-PAN1327/17 module allows customers to connect
to mobile phones and computers over Bluetooth from ANT+ enabled
devices, and allows customers with Bluetooth solutions to add ultra
low-power ANT+ connectivity.

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