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'[EE]:VCC,VDD,VSS ...'
2002\07\16@075457 by Renzo Giurini

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Can someone show me a site with electronic lessons in basic electronic or
explain the difference between VCC-VDD,VSS-Neg,GND-0.

I tried with Google with no result.

Thanks

Renzo Giurini

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2002\07\16@080914 by Rick C.

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You might try:
http://www.williamson-labs.com/home.htm
Plunder through the index on the left (specifically "Elementary Electricity")
and you will probably find what you're looking for.
Rick

Renzo Giurini wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2002\07\16@082813 by ards, Justin P

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just for a little more info if I remember correctly it has to do with
transistors configuration and type employed in the device i.e. Vcc
Voltage collector collector, Vdd Voltage Drain Drain, Vss Voltage Source
Source etc

Justin
{Original Message removed}

2002\07\16@083216 by Russell McMahon

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> Can someone show me a site with electronic lessons in basic electronic or
> explain the difference between VCC-VDD,VSS-Neg,GND-0.

See Nicks reference but ...

All these are names for power supply pins / connections  / levels for
electronic circuits.
The suffixes C/D/S are based on the technology used but are not always
accurately used.

VCC & VDD both mean "the positive power supply"
VSS & Neg and GND & 0 all mean "the ground connection". This is usually the
most negative of two supply rails. Sometimes there is a 3rd more negative
power supply.

VCC refers to the "Collector" voltage and therefore technically relates
strictly to bipolar devices.
VDD refers to the "Drain" voltage and therefire strictly relates to MOS
devices (such as PICs)
VSS refers to the "Source " and therefore also strictly refers to MOS
devices.

VCC and VDD are in practice usually used interchangeably.

Examples:

1.    PIC supply
VCC (or VDD)  = +5 volt
Negative supply = VSS = Gnd = 0 volts

2.    OP AMP supply
VCC = +5V
Gnd = 0v
VSS = neg = -5 volts

Strictly speaking, opamps are not seen to have collector or source supplies
(even though they may be bipolar or FET based) and their supplies are
usually referred to as eg V+ and V- or something similar.



       Russell McMahon

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2002\07\16@085009 by Jinx

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> VSS & Neg and GND & 0 all mean "the ground connection". This is
> usually the most negative of two supply rails. Sometimes there is a
> 3rd more negative power supply

Vee ?

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2002\07\16@090857 by Gordon Varney

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You can't have a geek with out an EE... :-)


Gordon Varney
http://www.iamnee.com



{Quote hidden}

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2002\07\16@165240 by Renzo Giurini

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Thanks to all for the lesson. I supposed that thinks are so, but when I
make a schematic with Eagle I get these warnings:  "POWER Pin IC1 VSS
connected to 0V" or "POWER Pin IC1 VDD connected to +5V", sometime and
error also.

Thanks
Renzo Giurini



At 08.06 16/07/02 -0500, you wrote:
>You can't have a geek with out an EE... :-)
>

Gordon,

and "geek" what is this?

Renzo

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2002\07\16@174300 by Jinx

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> and "geek" what is this?

Most of us

http://www.geek.com/welcome.htm

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2002\07\16@180356 by Brendan Moran

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-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

There are special Vcc and GND supplies in eagle.  It expects you to
use those.  If you don't, it just gives you warnings.  Ignore them.
Your other option is to get another piece of sftware, which might be
advisable, since eagle has no simulation capability that I've seen.
(Note: have only see version 3.54r1)

It's probable that their current versions are considerably less
annoying than this one, but currently, not having seen those, I don't
like eagle.

- --BJM
- ---
I keep having this feeling that I'm better at routing than the
autorouter.


- {Original Message removed}

2002\07\18@062311 by Vasile Surducan

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On Wed, 17 Jul 2002, Russell McMahon wrote:

> Examples:
>
> 1.    PIC supply
> VCC (or VDD)  = +5 volt
> Negative supply = VSS = Gnd = 0 volts
>
> 2.    OP AMP supply
> VCC = +5V
> Gnd = 0v
> VSS = neg = -5 volts
>

 Does the current flow in any circuit from + to - or this is just in our
minds ? because our teachers say that and the teachers of our teacher said
us the same ?
This is just a model so let your brain to fly away from...


the following will work perfectly if you know how to interface it:

> 1.    PIC supply
> VCC (or VDD)  = 0 volt
> Negative supply = VSS = -5V

also: PIC supply
Vcc = +205V
GND = +200V
HVGND = 0V
be sure it works, until you don't try to command a load connected from
IO pic pin to HVGND.

VCC, VDD, GND, VSS, VEE are things invented by humans to complicate their
lifes, or just to standardize something which can't be standardized.

best regards, Vasile
http://www.geocities.com/vsurducan

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2002\07\18@090820 by Bob Ammerman

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Actually Ben Franklin (early American statesman of
kite-flying-in-a-thunderstorm fame) guessed. He had a 1-in-2 chance of
getting it right. Of course he got it wrong.

Electrons flow from - to +.

Conventional current flows from + to -.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

{Original Message removed}

2002\07\18@114416 by Richard Mellina

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Current can be thought of as flowing in both directions because there are
two charge carriers. The negative charge carrier is the electron, it flows
from - to +. The positive charge carrier is the "hole", which is the absence
of an electron. When an electron jumps from atom A to atom B to fill a hole
in atom B it also leaves behind a hole in atom A. So the hole is thought to
travel from + to -. This is conventional current.

{Original Message removed}

2002\07\19@021224 by Vasile Surducan

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Hi Bob !

Are you sure those damn electrons  "flows" as you want to ?
And are not using some clever ways to fly, for example just jumping
( teleportation ? cuantum effect ? ) from
the A to the Z end of one wire, without passing by all B, C, D...etc
intermediate points ? Just take a deep thought in a spare programming
time. And please do a connection between this ideea and the tunneling
effect and the microwave generation, ( and why not, the skin effect ).
Then you'll
never say again: "electrons flows ( like the water) from - to +"
and of course not like "conventional current" either.

I'm very carefull when I'm explaining such things to any 10 years old
child, because all classical explanation are just formal. And that child
will remeber all his life a wrong explanation.
And the students from this list, too...


best regards,
Vasile




On Thu, 18 Jul 2002, Bob Ammerman wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

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