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'[EE]:Optrex LCD'
2002\05\14@231024 by Jinx

face picon face
I've been trying out a few Optrex displays given to me
yesterday, and found some that are a little different

http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/joecolquitt/optrex.html

Marked PJAD112ZC PWB-15164C and has a single
Oki M6222B interface/driver (very similar to the HD44780)
date coded 8920. The knob is the contrast control

The thing is, although the data sheet for the M6222B
says it's capable of a 16x1 display, this 'un has 15
alphanumeric positions and 3 x 7-segment characters
starting where you'd expect address 0x0f. As you can
see from the picture, 0x00 to 0x0e are readily accessible,
but what's the deal with the other 3 positions ? I can write
to address 0x0f, but I can't make sense of whatever
appears. Sometimes you get recognisable characters
in 0x0f, "0x10 & 0x11", sometimes not, sometimes blank.
I didn't specifically program it to display " P1"

Perhaps the 15164 is a clue ? 15 ? 16 ?

I could use them for just the predictable 15 characters but
would like to know if those other three are in fact useable

TIA

(btw, before I work on an LCD I ALWAYS put a piece of
acrylic over it. I dropped a screwdriver on an LCD once.
Just once, never again. Homey don't play that game no
more)

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2002\05\14@235700 by Jason Harper

picon face
Jinx <spam_OUTjoecolquittTakeThisOuTspamCLEAR.NET.NZ> wrote:
> I've been trying out a few Optrex displays given to me
> yesterday, and found some that are a little different
>
> http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/joecolquitt/optrex.html

My guess is that those 3 * 7 segments are just a remapping of some of the
pixels that would have formed the 16th normal character, and that you'll
need to use a custom character to usefully drive them.  Try writing
character 0 into that location, then walking a 1 bit through the first 8
bytes of CGRAM to map out the segments.
       Jason Harper

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2002\05\15@005746 by Jinx

face picon face
> My guess is that those 3 * 7 segments are just a
> remapping of some of the pixels that would have
> formed the 16th normal character

A reasonable guess but......

I wrote a routine that cycles through writing 0-255 to
position 16. Can confirm that all segments in the three
characters work, but the result was like a poker machine.

Each time a new value is written to pos16 all three
characters change together. Occassionally they are
the same but mostly all three are incomplete characters
with no apparent relationship to the immediately previous
or following characters. As they're 7-seg they aren't in
the character table, ruling out Japanese, but even so they
wouldn't come in groups of three

The only combination I could relate to was "ILL"

Will try an LCD forum, contact Optrex (ha !) or look
closely for any markings like "Property Of Area 51,
Alien Technologies And Languages Dept". I'm sure
I saw something like it in "Predator"

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2002\05\15@012938 by Jeff Berosik

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face
Jinx,
I think Jason could still be right.
Each normal character is 5x8 for 80 dots
The 3x7 segments are 21 dots, only half of a characters dots.
Thus you should on average see half of the segments 'lit' as charactor
dots for the same code in address 0x00 -0x0E.
Does a Space (0x20 and / or 0xA0) have all 3 characters off?
0xFF might have all segments on if it works. (Font table says may be
inadequate.)

Jeff Berosik

Jinx wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2002\05\15@041713 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>I think Jason could still be right.
>Each normal character is 5x8 for 80 dots
>The 3x7 segments are 21 dots, only half of a characters dots.
>Thus you should on average see half of the segments 'lit' as charactor
>dots for the same code in address 0x00 -0x0E.
>Does a Space (0x20 and / or 0xA0) have all 3 characters off?
>0xFF might have all segments on if it works. (Font table says may be
>inadequate.)

This was the way I started thinking as well. You say the chip is similar to
a 44780, so I would start by setting char 16 to one of the downloadable char
ram spots, and then download characters into the ram with only one bit of
the dot matrix turned on, and see which segment lights. I suspect you will
eventually map the 21 segments to individual dots in a character.

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2002\05\15@063149 by Jinx

face picon face
> I think Jason could still be right

Yes, he may get his Jace The Ace badge after all ;-)

There's some kind of relationship between CG and those
three characters.

segment a = top
               b = top right
               c = bottom right
               d = bottom
               e = bottom left
                f = top left
               g = middle

Using a loop to load CG0 with increasing data a
pattern can be seen, but it's not what I expected or
simply hoped for. If you make a loop to load byte0
of CG0 from 0x00 to 0x1f you get this -

Segment e  is bit0, then g, b, a, f for bits 1,2,3,4

So, the binary sequence gives this display with just
five segments of position 16

00001  e
00010  g
00011  e+g
00100  b
etc
11110  g+b+a+f
11111  e+g+b+a+f

That's just with the first byte - 6 others to load values into
(presumably 35 bits for 21 segments) and that doesn't
yet explain how the other two characters in positions 17
and 18 get displayed. More than likely each character has
a shape contained within some part of CG RAM

I've had a look through an LCD forum I usually turn to

http://www.eio.com/public/lcd/

but no reference that I've found to the PWB15164C, although
who knows what's buried in unspecified "LCD help needed"
posts

What started as a curiosity is now bugging me and holding
up "proper" work, so I may have to leave it until I can make
up table routines to test all possibilities, preferably by keys.

Still, it's a challenge when you come across something so
unexpected as to find a 16-character controller driving 18

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2002\05\15@072328 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>That's just with the first byte - 6 others to load values into
>(presumably 35 bits for 21 segments) and that doesn't
>yet explain how the other two characters in positions 17
>and 18 get displayed. More than likely each character has
>a shape contained within some part of CG RAM

I was expecting all segments of the 3 digits to relate to dots of one char
position. If you continue on loading the CG ram bytes for one char I suspect
you find the segments of the other digit positions will illuminate.

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2002\05\15@075914 by Bob Ammerman

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I think you missed the point of the prior post.

The 16th character would normally contain 35 pixels (5*7). It is likely that
this display instead maps 21 of those pixels to the 3 7-segment characters.
Any normal ascii character you send is going to be a mess in this case.

I am guessing three of the 7-pixel columns are mapped to the 3 7-segment
characters.

You will need to use the controllers 'downloadable' or 'user' character mode
to define custom characters to get a meaningful result.

Start by defining a custom character with a single pixel on -- this should
turn on at most one segment in the 7-segment characters. Now turn off that
pixel and turn on the next. Repeat until you've tried each possible pixel,
one at a time. You should be able to determine the mapping from pixels in
the custom character to segments on the display.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems



{Original Message removed}

2002\05\15@174731 by Jinx

face picon face
> I think you missed the point of the prior post.
>
> You will need to use the controllers 'downloadable'

Yes, I did miss the point - but have now realised that
the 7-seg patterns are part of CG RAM. It was one of
those " 'allo, wot's goin' on 'ere ?" moments. An LCD
with 18 chars, 3 of which didn't make sense etc etc etc

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