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'[EE]:Equipment suggestions for a student electroni'
2002\11\11@225630 by Randy Glenn

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Hi all,

I've been asked by some of my fellow IEEE Student Branch members to try
and come up with a wish list of equipment for a student electronics lab.
This would be a place where students could go to work on independent (ie
not necessarily school-related) projects, as the other labs are tied up
with course work basically all the time. Plus, we can't solder in them
due to a lack of fume hoods.

So, aside from the standard issue type stuff (scopes, function
generators, meters, parts assortments, etc.), is there anything anyone
can suggest that we should be looking at? Anything that anyone would
like to see fresh B. Eng's having experience in?

Thanks,

-Randy Glenn
Comp. Eng. & Mgt. II, McMaster University
Treasurer, McMaster IEEE Student Branch
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2002\11\11@231001 by Bill & Pookie

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Calipers and a simple label maker would be
usefull.

Bill

----- Original Message -----
From: "Randy Glenn" <.....picxpertKILLspamspam@spam@COGECO.CA>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Monday, November 11, 2002 7:55 PM
Subject: [EE]:Equipment suggestions for a student
electronics lab


> Hi all,
>
> I've been asked by some of my fellow IEEE
Student Branch members to try
> and come up with a wish list of equipment for a
student electronics lab.
> This would be a place where students could go to
work on independent (ie
> not necessarily school-related) projects, as the
other labs are tied up
> with course work basically all the time. Plus,
we can't solder in them
> due to a lack of fume hoods.
>
> So, aside from the standard issue type stuff
(scopes, function
> generators, meters, parts assortments, etc.), is
there anything anyone
> can suggest that we should be looking at?
Anything that anyone would
> like to see fresh B. Eng's having experience in?
>
> Thanks,
>
> -Randy Glenn
> Comp. Eng. & Mgt. II, McMaster University
> Treasurer, McMaster IEEE Student Branch
>
==================================================
=
> | picxpert-at-cogeco.ca - glennrb-at-mcmaster.ca
|
> | picxpert-at-yahoo.com -
randy_glenn-at-ieee.org |
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>
==================================================
=
>
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2002\11\11@233452 by Tony Harris

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Hmmm.

Depending on what the students are mostly making...  Aside from basic test
equipment (scopes, function generators, meters) - I'd think about a logic
analyzer (if a lot of digital circuitry is in the near future for them),
obviously power supplies, maybe permanently mounted breadboards that can be
used to test out circuits (they can bring their own, but have some mounted
ones for those that don't own them).  If there is a lot of higher frequency
work being done (ie: experimenting with VHF or UHF signals, ham radio bands
and so forth), perhaps a signal generator of that level, or a not too
terribly expensive service monitor?

You've already got the basics as far as I can see - anything else would be
fluff (although, quite nice fluff).  If there is a computer that will be
there, if there will be those programming PIC's or other PLC's, it might be
nice to have programmers available that a student could use.  And a
reference library - data sheets/ data sheet book for common parts should be
available.

Just some thoughts as I look around at what I have floating around my home.

I am far from an expert, but I am just thinking of the things that I would
use if I were in a lab such as that (short the soldering of course).

Only negative thing I can think of is that you will either need someone to
monitor the lab to make sure nothing grows legs, or have very trustworthy
students using this lab (which I am sure has already been taken into
consideration).

-Tony


{Original Message removed}

2002\11\11@234111 by Jim

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Phase-gain meters (measure op-amp closed
loop performance or any amplifiers low frequency
response), small network (measure impedance,
make S-Parameter measureemnts) analyzer (for antennna
work, RF filter design/analysis, RF amplifier design),
LCR bridge (bascic passsive component tests), GPIB
programmable measurement gear incl. power supplies ...

RF Jim

{Original Message removed}

2002\11\12@014236 by Roman Black

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> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Randy Glenn" <picxpertspamspam_OUTCOGECO.CA>

> > I've been asked by some of my fellow IEEE Student Branch members to try
> > and come up with a wish list of equipment for a student electronics lab.
> > This would be a place where students could go to work on independent (ie
> > not necessarily school-related) projects, as the other labs are tied up
> > with course work basically all the time.


A couple of decent sized variable dummy loads,
a heatsink with a pot and adjustable for constant
current is very handy. Also variable PSU adjustable
for constant current so you can dial it to 1.5 amps
(etc). I have a few large power resistors with
alligator clips, good for simple dummy loads and
series resistors etc.

A power driver stage, ie transitors/fets on heatsinks
you can connect to digital or micro projects to
drive motors and relays, a cheap PC-scope type
datalogger to record waveforms and data onto a PC.
-Roman

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2002\11\12@114416 by Doug Hewett

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Wire-wrap.


-----Original Message-----
From: Randy Glenn [KILLspampicxpertKILLspamspamCOGECO.CA]
Sent: Monday, November 11, 2002 7:55 PM
To: RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: [EE]:Equipment suggestions for a student electronics lab


Hi all,

I've been asked by some of my fellow IEEE Student Branch members to try
and come up with a wish list of equipment for a student electronics lab.
This would be a place where students could go to work on independent (ie
not necessarily school-related) projects, as the other labs are tied up
with course work basically all the time. Plus, we can't solder in them
due to a lack of fume hoods.

So, aside from the standard issue type stuff (scopes, function
generators, meters, parts assortments, etc.), is there anything anyone
can suggest that we should be looking at? Anything that anyone would
like to see fresh B. Eng's having experience in?

Thanks,

-Randy Glenn
Comp. Eng. & Mgt. II, McMaster University
Treasurer, McMaster IEEE Student Branch
===================================================
| picxpert-at-cogeco.ca - glennrb-at-mcmaster.ca  |
| picxpert-at-yahoo.com - randy_glenn-at-ieee.org |
|     http://picxpert.dyndns.org/~picxpert/       |
===================================================

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2002\11\12@160505 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> So, aside from the standard issue type stuff (scopes, function
> generators, meters, parts assortments, etc.), is there anything anyone
> can suggest that we should be looking at? Anything that anyone would
> like to see fresh B. Eng's having experience in?

This must be a joke, you forgot the microcontrollers! So: some flash
PICs, a programmer, a PC with MPLAB and some compilers.

And don't forget documentation: magazines, datasheets, 'the art of
electronics', and of course a fast internet connection...

And what about making PCBs?

Wouter van Ooijen

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consultancy, development, PICmicro products

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2002\11\12@165021 by Matt Heck

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Logic analyzers, protocol analyzers, and at least one good "Man, that
firmware problem took me all weekend to debug, but I got it" story.

Engineers that can't find mistakes quickly will rapidly whittle away
whatever speed their other skills give them, especially here, where
all the world's analog weirdness and digital timing issues collide
with all the fun and excitement (cough) of software debugging.

Build some neat circuits, then deliberately break them by making the
same typical mistakes in them you know they're likely to walk into.
Teach them how to spot the problems quickly and hunt down the causes
without going nuts.

Teach them how to estimate job time-- not just the time it takes to
design and build a circuit, but how to have a rough estimate of how
long it will take to debug or repair a glitchy prototype.  Not any
easy skill to get, but oh, so valuable if you can manage it.

Cheers,
  Matt Heck
  Crystal Engineering Corporation

PS:
Being primarily a software guy myself, I'm still working on that last
bit.  My latest theory is to just leave off the units of time:
"...and exactly how long will this take, Mr. Heck?"
"Five, sir.  Possibly six."
"Five or six what?  Days?"
"That's the part I'm not sure of, sir.  But it's definitely five or
six."

> {Original Message removed}

2002\11\13@004613 by MegaBolt

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A web site containing successful projects, datasheets
new discoveries, etc

{Quote hidden}

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2002\11\13@120354 by Cris Wilson

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> > So, aside from the standard issue type stuff (scopes, function
> > generators, meters, parts assortments, etc.), is there anything anyone
> > can suggest that we should be looking at?

It may have already been said, but the operator's manual for all of the
equipment should be kept in the rooms - or at least a copy of it. I've seen
a lot of equipment damaged because some professor decided to store the
manuals away somewhere, then lost them, and then someone goes and
overloads the equipment.
Training classes might be nice to have for people. Scopes can be pretty
daunting if you've never used one.
Adjustable power supplies are always nice to have for those CMOS and TTL
projects.
And a phone in the lab so someone can call for emergency help after someone
goofs up, gets blown across the room, and breaks an arm or worse.

>  Anything that anyone would
> > like to see fresh B. Eng's having experience in?

The biggest complaint that I hear is that they don't know how to troubleshoot a
broken circuit. So trouble shooting circuits would have to be at the top of
my list.
I've also heard complaints that they couldn't figure out transistor logic.

Good luck.



_____________________________________________________________
Cris Wilson
Information Resource Consultant
College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities
Clemson University
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2002\11\13@141636 by llile

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Real world stuff.  EE's in school always deal with ideal diodes and
transistors at 25C with no noise.  Find stuff that fails when it gets hot,
gets hit by noise transients,  or gets plugged in.  Say you build a DC
power supply where the pass transistor works until it gets hot, or a PIC
circuit with an unfiltered 5V supply that works on a battery supply but
not on a line voltage supply.    Have them work with it until they begin
to understand the usual culprits.  This isn't really equipment so much as
projects.



"A murder?  Round up all the usual suspects!"
        --Dick Tracy


-- Lawrence Lile





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11/13/02 11:02 AM
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>  Anything that anyone would
> > like to see fresh B. Eng's having experience in?

The biggest complaint that I hear is that they don't know how to
troubleshoot a
broken circuit. So trouble shooting circuits would have to be at the top
of
my list.
I've also heard complaints that they couldn't figure out transistor logic.

Good luck.



_____________________________________________________________
Cris Wilson
Information Resource Consultant
College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities
Clemson University
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2002\11\14@040745 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Say you build a DC power supply where the pass
>transistor  works until it gets hot,

Or just a 7805 without heatsink, and high input voltage :)))))))))

Wait for them to wonder why the power goes off and on, sags, and does all
sorts of other funny things.

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