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'[EE]:Batteries'
2008\02\04@171840 by Neil Cherry

picon face
I've decided that with the rather odd weather in NJ (no snow) that
I would take advantage of the 'nice' weather and start riding into
work. Because of the strange construction habits of some of the
roadways (very bad engineering) I need to travel pre-rush hour
(none of the roads are bike friendly).

I'm putting my commuter and backup bikes back together (they're
in various stages of construction) and I'm getting my lighting
system straightened out. Right now the systems I have use 'D'
size batteries. If I switch over to rechargeables then I'll be
getting 'C' size batteries inside a 'D' size case. I'd like
something a little more friendly (as in rechargeable). I'm not
overly concerned with weight as I have a nice bike trailer and
any extra weight is used as a training tool. I just don't want
some huge monstrosity. Anyone have any good pointers on
batteries? Should I look at PWM to regulate the power usage?
Any other ideas?

Thanks

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2008\02\04@173554 by Bob Blick

face picon face
Hi Neil,

I'm sure Chops will be able to add something, he's got
a lot of experience in flashlights. But definitely you
should check out lithium-ion batteries and white LEDs
and LED controllers. dealextreme.com is a good source
for that, prices are low but drop-shipping takes a
couple of weeks(or longer right now since it's lunar
new year).

Cheerful regards,

Bob

--- Neil Cherry <.....ncherryKILLspamspam@spam@comcast.net> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2008\02\04@174718 by Matt Pobursky

flavicon
face
On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 17:18:35 -0500, Neil Cherry wrote:
> I've decided that with the rather odd weather in NJ (no snow) that I
> would take advantage of the 'nice' weather and start riding into work.
> Because of the strange construction habits of some of the roadways (very
> bad engineering) I need to travel pre-rush hour (none of the roads are
> bike friendly).
>
> I'm putting my commuter and backup bikes back together (they're in
> various stages of construction) and I'm getting my lighting system
> straightened out. Right now the systems I have use 'D' size batteries. If
> I switch over to rechargeables then I'll be getting 'C' size batteries
> inside a 'D' size case. I'd like something a little more friendly (as in
> rechargeable). I'm not overly concerned with weight as I have a nice bike
> trailer and any extra weight is used as a training tool. I just don't
> want some huge monstrosity. Anyone have any good pointers on batteries?
> Should I look at PWM to regulate the power usage? Any other ideas?

Neil,

You can get "real" NiMH D-cells. I've personally tested and use these in
some LED lanterns I have. Excellent cells. These things are definitely not
re-packaged C-cells -- they weight about 6 oz. each, nearly twice what a
NiMH C-cell weighs.

http://www.all-battery.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=568

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

2008\02\04@175211 by peter green

flavicon
face

> If I switch over to rechargeables then I'll be
> getting 'C' size batteries inside a 'D' size case.
>  
Yeah while high capacity nimh AAs are common trying to get nimh cells in
the larger normal sizes with a decent capacity to size ratio is a bit
tricky. They do exist but there is quite a price premium.

doing a quick look on farnell I found a 10AH nimh D cells
http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/Electrical/Batteries,+Chargers+&+Holders/ANSMANN/5030641/displayProduct.jsp?sku=1173791&_requestid=100587
but at £7 each excluding vat they aren't cheap.

2008\02\04@175442 by Neil Cherry

picon face
Bob Blick wrote:
> Hi Neil,
>
> I'm sure Chops will be able to add something, he's got
> a lot of experience in flashlights. But definitely you
> should check out lithium-ion batteries and white LEDs
> and LED controllers. dealextreme.com is a good source
> for that, prices are low but drop-shipping takes a
> couple of weeks(or longer right now since it's lunar
> new year).

Thanks, I don't care about long waits as I have the
current working system. I'm just trying to make sure
I setup an easy to use system so that I can continue
to use it. :-) The LIon batteries seem to be 3.7v.
I'm not sure what the current voltage the system is
designed to use so I may need to modify things to
work with the bulbs it has (I don't want to be
burning bulbs out as I ride because they ran too
'hot'.

Thanks

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2008\02\04@175515 by peter green

flavicon
face
peter green wrote:
>
>> If I switch over to rechargeables then I'll be
>> getting 'C' size batteries inside a 'D' size case.  
> Yeah while high capacity nimh AAs are common trying to get nimh cells
> in the larger normal sizes with a decent capacity to size ratio is a
> bit tricky. They do exist but there is quite a price premium.
>
> doing a quick look on farnell I found a 10AH nimh D cells
> http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/Electrical/Batteries,+Chargers+&+Holders/ANSMANN/5030641/displayProduct.jsp?sku=1173791&_requestid=100587
> but at £7 each excluding vat they aren't cheap.
>
oops wrong price, the actual price for the big nimh D cell was £8.73

2008\02\04@175951 by Neil Cherry

picon face
Matt Pobursky wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I'm not worried about weigh, with my fellow cyclist I'm considered
an extreme nut-case. My camelbak has a 3L bladder and all the change
I get dumped into the backpak (along with tools tire and what-ever).
It tends to weigh in at around 40 lbs. I use it as a training tool.
I also rides long distances (up to 120 miles on Saturdays during
May - Oct.). There tend to be no bike shops where I ride (NJ Pine
Barrens).

I'll take a look as the sound simple and perfect for my needs!

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2008\02\04@181306 by Dr Skip

picon face


Neil Cherry wrote:
> I'm not worried about weigh, with my fellow cyclist I'm considered
> an extreme nut-case. My camelbak has a 3L bladder and all the change
> I get dumped into the backpak (along with tools tire and what-ever).
> It tends to weigh in at around 40 lbs. I use it as a training tool.
> I also rides long distances (up to 120 miles on Saturdays during
> May - Oct.).

Having cycle-commuted in my early days, I can say with certainty that you
deserve your reputation! :)

2008\02\04@191611 by Jake Anderson

flavicon
face
Take a look at a pack of dewalt batteries from ebay (36V, they use A123
M1 cells).
They can be had for around $80US if your patient.
36V 2.2Ah ~ 700grams.

Li-Poly is slightly lighter but less robust (and prone to "may emit
flame in a bigass jet")
Cycle life of A123 is also better, reputedly > 2000 - 3000.

Charging is CC/CV like a lead acid. You are sposed to balance the cells
though which may be a negative.

Neil Cherry wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\02\04@200911 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
Many good and reasonably green recommendations here. If you
want something that meets the need well and you don't mind
it needing a real man to pull it (as is obviously the case)
then a lead acid battery would serve you well. Either 6V
with a linear or switching regulator (or resistor ! :-) ) or
12 V with a switcher. Cheap for capacity. Also large and
heavy for capacity compared to alternatives but not vastly
so in this application.

en eg 12V 7AH brick gives (logically and more or less
actually) 80WH or so.
10 Watts for 8 hours should keep most people happy -
especially with LED lighting.
Charging overnight at C/10 would usually be more than
adequate.

If money and playing time are less important then Bob
Blick's much beloed liIon would be a good solution here.
BUT charge at appropriate current limited rate (usually C/1)
until Vlimit is reached (typically 4.2V) and THEn stop
charging. This gives you about 60 to 70% of cell capacity
and is THE most long life storage point for LiIon. As long
as about 65% capacity is OK for you this maximises life and
gives you 1 hour charging AND is a very very easy charging
algorithm to implement :-). [[If Vcell < 4.2V then charge at
C/1 else don't charge]]. No doubt (whatsoever) someone here
will improve on that advice but the basics should be sound.

Put the battery in a vent-with-flame and subdued-explosion
proof area of your trailer and you're good to go. The above
charging algorithm should largely be gentle on your cells
unless they are over discharged. By using a commercial
charger or IC and stopping after an hour of C1 charging you
get the same result. Longer is OK - it just reduces cell
life. BB will no doubt tell you that these batteries are in
gfact very well behaved when not overly abused. lighting
should be a very low abuse use. Shorting is not a low abuse
use :-).



       Russell







2008\02\04@203936 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> doing a quick look on farnell I found a 10AH nimh D cells
> uk.farnell.com/jsp/Electrical/Batteries,+Chargers+&+Holders/ANSMANN/5030641/displayProduct.jsp?sku=1173791&_requestid=100587
> but at £7 each excluding vat they aren't cheap.
>

> oops wrong price, the actual price for the big nimh D cell
> was £8.73

At 1.2V nominal, that's GBP0.73/Wh.

A 12V 7Ah SLA would cost GBP61 at that rate.
here I can buy a reasonably OK 12V 7AH SLA for under GBP10
and an acceptable one for possibly half that.

If "green" issues are not the greatest factor then lead acid
is still pretty attractive in this role.

If green issues ARE (or aren't) a key factor you can take
suitable care with the recycling in due course. The highly
enthused could even strip the cell when dead and meutralise
the acid electrolyte prior to recycling the lead.

Here (NZ) people pay useful money for dead car batteries,
suggesting that the lead is getting properly recycled. With
NiCd batteries it's not at all certainthat they always
actually reach Nirvana after having been 'properly" disposed
of.



       Russell



2008\02\04@220333 by James Newton

face picon face
Dude, don't take this the wrong way, but I'd sort of like to see a picture
of your legs...

120 miles? In ONE day? With a 40 lb pack?

Like, how high can you jump, man?

--
James.

{Original Message removed}

2008\02\04@222509 by Neil Cherry

picon face
peter green wrote:
> peter green wrote:
>>> If I switch over to rechargeables then I'll be
>>> getting 'C' size batteries inside a 'D' size case.  
>> Yeah while high capacity nimh AAs are common trying to get nimh cells
>> in the larger normal sizes with a decent capacity to size ratio is a
>> bit tricky. They do exist but there is quite a price premium.
>>
>> doing a quick look on farnell I found a 10AH nimh D cells
>> http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/Electrical/Batteries,+Chargers+&+Holders/ANSMANN/5030641/displayProduct.jsp?sku=1173791&_requestid=100587
>> but at £7 each excluding vat they aren't cheap.
>>
> oops wrong price, the actual price for the big nimh D cell was £8.73
>
>

Well I won't be purchasing any batteries from Farnell, UK. :-)
I can get similar 10000mAh for ~$8 (US). The charger is only
$10 (US). This is affordable hopefully this will work.

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2008\02\04@225150 by Neil Cherry

picon face
James Newton wrote:
> Dude, don't take this the wrong way, but I'd sort of like to see a picture
> of your legs...
>
> 120 miles? In ONE day? With a 40 lb pack?
>
> Like, how high can you jump, man?

I don't know!? Since my legs are built specifically for cycling
probably not very high. BTW, the longest ride we do is 207 mile,
one day ride (close to June 21st). It takes 12.5 hours worth of
saddle time (start at 4:30 AM and finish no later than 8:30 PM).
We normally finish before 8 PM (once as early as 6:50 PM). I've
done 6 of the these double centuries. They're not hard to do
but you'd better know what you're doing. Oh, the pack is lighten
up quite a bit but I still have the 3L of Gatorade on my back
that I kept filled every twenty miles (our normal stop distance).

I'll just say that I don't look like that guy in Monster.com
commercial (he pedals to keep the earth spinning). Actually my
legs fit tightly in normal jeans. The problem is that my belly
is still too large for my slight frame. Hopefully this year
I'll lose a lot more weight off my body.

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2008\02\04@225400 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> Well I won't be purchasing any batteries from Farnell, UK.
> :-)
I can get similar 10000mAh for ~$8 (US). The charger is only
$10 (US). This is affordable hopefully this will work.
/>

I suspect that I'm beating a dead horse here, but ... :-)

That's still a high price compared to SLA (sealed lead
acid).
Above costs $US0.66 / Watt.hour.

12V 7AH SLA would cost about $US55 at that rate.
You can always buy premium gold plated ones (with OFCu leads
? :-) ) for that but I'd hope that you can also get $US10 to
$US15 ones.




       Russell

2008\02\04@234852 by Neil Cherry

picon face
Apptech wrote:
>> Well I won't be purchasing any batteries from Farnell, UK.
>> :-)
> I can get similar 10000mAh for ~$8 (US). The charger is only
> $10 (US). This is affordable hopefully this will work.
> />
>
> I suspect that I'm beating a dead horse here, but ... :-)
>
> That's still a high price compared to SLA (sealed lead
> acid).
> Above costs $US0.66 / Watt.hour.
>
> 12V 7AH SLA would cost about $US55 at that rate.

Oops, I just noticed that.

> You can always buy premium gold plated ones (with OFCu leads
> ? :-) ) for that but I'd hope that you can also get $US10 to
> $US15 ones.

I think due to my limited time I *may* go the 'D' cell route
as that would fit in the current setup. I also have a lead cell
setup but I need to find it and the charger. At the moment I
have to think through all my options.

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2008\02\05@115335 by David VanHorn

picon face
I was wondering about that guy with the $1000 replacement for a car's low-beam.

Would it not be appropriate to just use a car's low beam?
His solution didn't look all that small.

Some of the LEDs I'm playing with lately are in that range, but they
aren't all that affordable.

2008\02\05@122658 by Neil Cherry

picon face
David VanHorn wrote:
> I was wondering about that guy with the $1000 replacement for a car's
> low-beam.

I think I'll stick to something a little smaller. :-) It's not
that I'm lazy but I'd like the keep the bike a bit neat.

Turns out that the 'D' battery setup uses 5 batteries in series
(7.5v max). If I setup with two kits I can run the 10w lamp,
the 15w, the 10w and 15w or two 15w lamps. I have four kits,
one from a friend who gave me the broken kit. The switch is behaving
oddly and it may have a small micro in it to monitor the power.

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2008\02\05@123117 by Neil Cherry

picon face
Dr Skip wrote:
>
> Neil Cherry wrote:
>> I'm not worried about weigh, with my fellow cyclist I'm considered an
>> extreme nut-case. My camelbak has a 3L bladder and all the change I get
>> dumped into the backpak (along with tools tire and what-ever). It tends
>> to weigh in at around 40 lbs. I use it as a training tool. I also rides
>> long distances (up to 120 miles on Saturdays during May - Oct.).
>
> Having cycle-commuted in my early days, I can say with certainty that you
>  deserve your reputation! :)

Among some of my friends I'm considered a moderate distance rider.
These guys ride brevets, 300km up to 1200km rides which have to be
completed in a certain amount of time (not a leisurely pace).

;-)

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2008\02\05@124920 by Martin Klingensmith

face
flavicon
face
David VanHorn wrote:
> I was wondering about that guy with the $1000 replacement for a car's low-beam.
>
> Would it not be appropriate to just use a car's low beam?
> His solution didn't look all that small.
>
> Some of the LEDs I'm playing with lately are in that range, but they
> aren't all that affordable.
>  
A nice custom case in low quantity will add some money, but $1000 is for
the people with more money than brains.
What kind of LEDs have you been playing with lately?

-
Martin

2008\02\05@131235 by David VanHorn

picon face
> A nice custom case in low quantity will add some money, but $1000 is for
> the people with more money than brains.
> What kind of LEDs have you been playing with lately?

Osram golden dragon IR emitters, and some interesting visible ones at
much higher power, 20W or so.  They come with warnings like lasers do.

2008\02\05@134446 by John Gardner

picon face
> David VanHorn wrote:
> I was wondering about that guy with the $1000 replacement for a car's low-beam

Me too. I should know better than to indulge in irony on an engineering list.

I'm not in Neil's iron-man league, but hope to spend the summer touring
& camping - Turns out there's a commercial set-up that'll keep AA's chged,
consisting of a 3W Dymotec dynamo, Ixon IQ light, & a "Charge & Ride"
gizmo, all made by Busch & Mueller. Can be had for less than $300 - My
1st LED headlamp, but expectations are low - I don't ride at night.

best regards, Jack


On 2/5/08, Martin Klingensmith <spamBeGonemartinspamBeGonespamnnytech.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\02\05@152607 by Neil Cherry

picon face
John Gardner wrote:
>> David VanHorn wrote:
>> I was wondering about that guy with the $1000 replacement for a car's low-beam
>
> Me too. I should know better than to indulge in irony on an engineering list.

Actually I'm not sure the irony was missed. Though I can't see how
you could spend $1000 on a lighting system ??? Sure would be fancy!
Oddly enough I thought about the systems used by auto's and a lot
can be learned from their work. I'm pretty sure a 45W light with a
small enough reflector and a 10Ah 12v battery (or two) could be
thrown together 'cheap'. Of course do I need a light that can see
ahead several hundred feet but has a blank zone a few feet ahead of
me (answer is no). Actually what a cyclist really need is a left
and right light so blind spots on the roadway are easier to see.

> I'm not in Neil's iron-man league, but hope to spend the summer touring

I'm no iron man just a mental case who needs to ride to calm down.
I tend to relax a little after a long ride but my wife still
requires that I do my choirs around the house so I don't get to
take it easy. :-/

> & camping - Turns out there's a commercial set-up that'll keep AA's chged,
> consisting of a 3W Dymotec dynamo, Ixon IQ light, & a "Charge & Ride"
> gizmo, all made by Busch & Mueller. Can be had for less than $300 - My
> 1st LED headlamp, but expectations are low - I don't ride at night.

Currently the best working bike system I have is a 2W Cateye. It focuses
the light in the perfect spot. My 10W & 15W systems leave a bit to be
desired but I've never paired them together.

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2008\02\05@162021 by Dr Skip

picon face


Neil Cherry wrote:
> Currently the best working bike system I have is a 2W Cateye. It focuses
> the light in the perfect spot. My 10W & 15W systems leave a bit to be
> desired but I've never paired them together.
>

I hesitate to suggest this, but you probably have "Dollar Tree" stores there in
NJ. Here, they sell small 5 and 7 LED lights for $1 that throw a good light.
They're plastic and very light - even lighter once you toss all but the
head-LED-reflector part. They are made to run off of 3 AAA cells and have no
other components.

I've found it cheap, handy and effective to buy these, take the head off, and
apply whatever regulation I see fit (even a 3-terminal reg in current reg mode)
for spot or general lighting. For the price, you could line the fork and stem
with lights for a few dollars - and talk about redundancy! ;)

Just balance your supply with how many hundreds of LEDs and parabolic ;)
reflectors you want...

2008\02\05@170303 by Neil Cherry

picon face
Dr Skip wrote:
>
> Neil Cherry wrote:
>> Currently the best working bike system I have is a 2W Cateye. It focuses
>> the light in the perfect spot. My 10W & 15W systems leave a bit to be
>> desired but I've never paired them together.
>>
>
> I hesitate to suggest this, but you probably have "Dollar Tree" stores there in
> NJ. Here, they sell small 5 and 7 LED lights for $1 that throw a good light.
> They're plastic and very light - even lighter once you toss all but the
> head-LED-reflector part. They are made to run off of 3 AAA cells and have no
> other components.

I'm familiar with these lights. I'm not not particularly partial to LED
light. It tends to show up as a blue color on the roadway and hides/blends
things into the shadows. I have an LED lamp and I keep that as my 'all
else has failed' light. I find I prefer the yellow tint of most white
lights.

I'll still keep these in mind though.

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2008\02\05@171830 by Bob Blick

face picon face
--- Neil Cherry <ncherryEraseMEspam.....comcast.net> wrote:

> I'm familiar with these lights. I'm not not
> particularly partial to LED
> light. It tends to show up as a blue color on the
> roadway and hides/blends
> things into the shadows. I have an LED lamp and I
> keep that as my 'all
> else has failed' light. I find I prefer the yellow
> tint of most white
> lights.

I've seen the trick of putting some yellow LEDs in
with the whites to smooth out the spectrum.

Cheerful regards,

Bob


2008\02\05@171900 by David VanHorn

picon face
> I'm familiar with these lights. I'm not not particularly partial to LED
> light. It tends to show up as a blue color on the roadway and hides/blends
> things into the shadows. I have an LED lamp and I keep that as my 'all
> else has failed' light. I find I prefer the yellow tint of most white
> lights.

A nice green might be interesting. Of course you can buy LEDs in
different colors and mix in a bit of the appropriate one.

One thing I find still a bit "sneaky" about LED lights, is that the
color is flat all the way down. No yellowing as we are SO used to with
bulbs.  So I always carry two sets of backup batteries.

2008\02\05@173948 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
> I'm familiar with these lights. I'm not not particularly
> partial to LED
> light. It tends to show up as a blue color on the roadway
> and hides/blends
> things into the shadows. I have an LED lamp and I keep
> that as my 'all
> else has failed' light. I find I prefer the yellow tint of
> most white
> lights.

LED white lighting is a very variable feast. If you use a
quality high power LED you can choose "warm white" which
should suit your colour rendering preferences. I've foung
the 3 Watt Edison Star LEDs good in efficiency and price.



       Russell

2008\02\05@175522 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
>> I'm familiar with these lights. I'm not not
>> particularly partial to LED
>> light. It tends to show up as a blue color on the
>> roadway and hides/blends
>> things into the shadows. I have an LED lamp and I
>> keep that as my 'all
>> else has failed' light. I find I prefer the yellow
>> tint of most white
>> lights.

> I've seen the trick of putting some yellow LEDs in
> with the whites to smooth out the spectrum.

Yes - a useful idea.

Have a look at a chromaticity diagram that shows white in
the middle with the colours around the periphery.
Example here if needed. 60 kB

       http://others.servebeer.com/misc/chromaticity.jpg

The white area in the middle does not make "sense" because
it's partially based on 'just how the brain works'. If the
vector sum of the light seen falls in that area we see
white, of sorts. This is simplistic, but if you have a light
that is not quite as you want it to be you can "pull" it in
the desired direction by vector adding some appropriate
colour or, more bizarrely, several less apparent colours
that overall pull you to where you want to be.

So eg if you were on the somewhat bluish 0.3,0.3 point you
could add a whiff of 570 yellow, OR some 510 greenish-blue
(near Cyan) and some 600 ish red. Adding Cyan and Red to
make a bluish light yellowish is a good trick :-).

Some of our buses use "Yellow" LED message panels to meet
regulations re allowable colours. At any distance they do
appear yellow. Up close they are a nasty mess of mixed reds
and greens. Good enough to meet regulations, apparently.



       Russell






2008\02\05@180741 by Bob Blick

face picon face
--- Apptech <EraseMEapptechspamparadise.net.nz> wrote:
> Some of our buses use "Yellow" LED message panels to
> meet
> regulations re allowable colours.

Do you have a link to the proper use of color for
indicators? I keep trying to convince my boss that red
is not an acceptable color for a power indicator.

Thanks,

Bob

2008\02\05@232525 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Feb 5, 2008, at 12:26 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:

> I can't see how you could spend $1000 on a lighting system ???

www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=125819
52 million candlepower mercury arc re-built... parabolic rhodium
plated reflector.  Precision lamp mount.  Electronic Ballast.

BillW


2008\02\05@235414 by Dr Skip

picon face
If you don't want LEDs, then

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40809
for $3.99 and 500,000 candlepower and runs off a 12v gel cell (at this price
you can get dual headlights)

or

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=8825
3 million and battery/charger built in (I use this one, pointed at the ceiling,
to light up the room during power outages...) and it has high and low settings

or

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=93366
1 million candlepower, streamlined shape, built in battery and charger, and $14.99

See and be seen!!!!


2008\02\06@003652 by Neil Cherry

picon face
Dr Skip wrote:
> If you don't want LEDs, then
>
> www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40809
> for $3.99 and 500,000 candlepower and runs off a 12v gel cell (at this price
> you can get dual headlights)
>
> or
>
> www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=8825
> 3 million and battery/charger built in (I use this one, pointed at the ceiling,
> to light up the room during power outages...) and it has high and low settings
>
> or
>
> www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=93366
> 1 million candlepower, streamlined shape, built in battery and charger, and $14.99
>
> See and be seen!!!!

I think I'll pass adding that to my bike would make me look too
dorky (uhm but I do wear spandex) besides I wan't both hands
on the handle bars to handle traffic.

--
Linux Home Automation         Neil Cherry       RemoveMEncherryEraseMEspamEraseMElinuxha.com
http://www.linuxha.com/                         Main site
http://linuxha.blogspot.com/                    My HA Blog
Author of:            Linux Smart Homes For Dummies

2008\02\06@003759 by Neil Cherry

picon face
William "Chops" Westfield wrote:
> On Feb 5, 2008, at 12:26 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:
>
>> I can't see how you could spend $1000 on a lighting system ???
>
> www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=125819
> 52 million candlepower mercury arc re-built... parabolic rhodium
> plated reflector.  Precision lamp mount.  Electronic Ballast.

How the heck would I explain the burnt motorist if I hit them with
that? Dang that's nasty!

--
Linux Home Automation         Neil Cherry       RemoveMEncherryspam_OUTspamKILLspamlinuxha.com
http://www.linuxha.com/                         Main site
http://linuxha.blogspot.com/                    My HA Blog
Author of:            Linux Smart Homes For Dummies

2008\02\06@005647 by Apptech

face
flavicon
face
>> I can't see how you could spend $1000 on a lighting
>> system ???
>
> www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=125819
> 52 million candlepower mercury arc re-built... parabolic
> rhodium
> plated reflector.  Precision lamp mount.  Electronic
> Ballast.

Or, just try and fit out a photographic studio with "brand
name" lighting :-)


       Russell

2008\02\06@043148 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>A nice green might be interesting. Of course you can buy LEDs
>in different colors and mix in a bit of the appropriate one.

Careful, someone might think you are a doctor ...

2008\02\06@043158 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>Do you have a link to the proper use of color for
>indicators? I keep trying to convince my boss that red
>is not an acceptable color for a power indicator.

Point him at CE regulations. Under those you are not allowed red as a power
indicator. I got pulled up over it, and had to fit a green indicator.

2008\02\06@090457 by Dr Skip

picon face


Neil Cherry wrote:
> I think I'll pass adding that to my bike would make me look too
> dorky (uhm but I do wear spandex) besides I wan't both hands
> on the handle bars to handle traffic.
>

I wouldn't be so tacky as to suggest you HOLD them... ;)

The $3.99 one has the right parts for 1 or 2 lights with lens and reflector of
the right spectrum. Take the parts and build a pair at fork level, cut out an
arc at the bottom of the reflector and add a simple pwm (555 timer and a fet)
and you have near-in light and distance, will be seen, and you can dim or crank
it as needed.

The streamlined one might be a good one for handlebar level. Add the same pwm
circuit and fab a bracket and it not only would be a nice big light with
battery, but with the pwm and your needs, it would last for hours on a charge
AND if the bracket were done right, it could be removable for hand use.

Mods can be anything form shopping the handles off to a simple bracket as is to
just using the parts. Dimmed down, the bulbs should last forever too...
Cranked up there'll be no doubt who's got the biggest... ;)


2008\02\06@093751 by David VanHorn

picon face
On Feb 6, 2008 4:21 AM, Alan B. Pearce <RemoveMEA.B.PearceTakeThisOuTspamspamrl.ac.uk> wrote:
> >A nice green might be interesting. Of course you can buy LEDs
> >in different colors and mix in a bit of the appropriate one.
>
> Careful, someone might think you are a doctor ...

I'm not, but I play one sometimes. :)

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