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'[EE]: white goo from superglue'
2007\02\21@105212 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
(I guess this falls under everything engineering...)

I use superglue to glue some metal parts in a box I make. Recently my
customer complained about some white grease-like goo on the PCB. This
goo appears mostly near the places where I used the glue. Has anyone
seen this? Is it known to be harmfull to electronics? How to prevent
this - up to now I waited 12 hours (for the glue to harden - seemed more
than enough for one-second-glue) before closing the boxes, maybe I must
wait longer?

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2007\02\21@112249 by Mike Harrison

flavicon
face
On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 16:51:56 +0100, you wrote:

>(I guess this falls under everything engineering...)
>
>I use superglue to glue some metal parts in a box I make. Recently my
>customer complained about some white grease-like goo on the PCB. This
>goo appears mostly near the places where I used the glue. Has anyone
>seen this? Is it known to be harmfull to electronics? How to prevent
>this - up to now I waited 12 hours (for the glue to harden - seemed more
>than enough for one-second-glue) before closing the boxes, maybe I must
>wait longer?
>
>Wouter van Ooijen

I think it comes from vapour from the glue - I saw this on a PCB that was glued into a small acrylic
moulding.
You can get 'low bloom' cyanoacrylate to prevent this, e.g. Loctite 46017

2007\02\21@112722 by Timothy J. Weber

face picon face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> (I guess this falls under everything engineering...)
>
> I use superglue to glue some metal parts in a box I make. Recently my
> customer complained about some white grease-like goo on the PCB. This
> goo appears mostly near the places where I used the glue. Has anyone
> seen this? Is it known to be harmfull to electronics? How to prevent
> this - up to now I waited 12 hours (for the glue to harden - seemed more
> than enough for one-second-glue) before closing the boxes, maybe I must
> wait longer?

I saw this myself a while ago, and my wife (who reads murder mysteries)
says cyanoacrylate glue makes that white powdery stuff where your finger
oils are left.  Apparently that feature is used in forensics.

Don't know whether it's bad, though.
--
Timothy J. Weber
http://timothyweber.org

2007\02\21@114641 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>I saw this myself a while ago, and my wife (who reads murder
>mysteries) says cyanoacrylate glue makes that white powdery
>stuff where your finger oils are left.
>Apparently that feature is used in forensics.

Yeah, if you watch any of the CSI series you often see them putting items in
a fume box with cyanoacylate fumes to bring out fingerprints.

2007\02\21@114948 by Mike Harrison

flavicon
face
On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 16:51:56 +0100, you wrote:

>(I guess this falls under everything engineering...)
>
>I use superglue to glue some metal parts in a box I make. Recently my
>customer complained about some white grease-like goo on the PCB. This
>goo appears mostly near the places where I used the glue. Has anyone
>seen this? Is it known to be harmfull to electronics? How to prevent
>this - up to now I waited 12 hours (for the glue to harden - seemed more
>than enough for one-second-glue) before closing the boxes, maybe I must
>wait longer?

I think the delay may be due to the glue vapour waiting until moisture condenses on the PCB.

2007\02\21@123115 by Peter P.

picon face
Wouter van Ooijen <wouter <at> voti.nl> writes:

> (I guess this falls under everything engineering...)
>
> I use superglue to glue some metal parts in a box I make. Recently my
> customer complained about some white grease-like goo on the PCB. This
> goo appears mostly near the places where I used the glue. Has anyone
> seen this? Is it known to be harmfull to electronics? How to prevent
> this - up to now I waited 12 hours (for the glue to harden - seemed more
> than enough for one-second-glue) before closing the boxes, maybe I must
> wait longer?

I think that it's acrylic plastic (same as polymerized glue). It comes off with
warm acetone. It is not harmful. I think that you can control it by changing the
humidity while the glue cures (higher I think). E.g. putting the glued boxes in
a large cardboard box that also contains a humid towel should do it as a test.

Peter P.





2007\02\21@125153 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
Mike Harrison wrote:
> On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 16:51:56 +0100, you wrote:
>
>  
>> (I guess this falls under everything engineering...)
>>
>> I use superglue to glue some metal parts in a box I make. Recently my
>> customer complained about some white grease-like goo on the PCB. This
>> goo appears mostly near the places where I used the glue. Has anyone
>> seen this? Is it known to be harmfull to electronics? How to prevent
>> this - up to now I waited 12 hours (for the glue to harden - seemed more
>> than enough for one-second-glue) before closing the boxes, maybe I must
>> wait longer?
>>    
>
> I think the delay may be due to the glue vapour waiting until moisture condenses on the PCB.
>
>  
I agree with this. I use a gel-type cyano superglue which forms a
perfectly-clear joint until about 12 hrs later, whereupon a
faint white mist has formed on anything in its vacinity...


--Bob

2007\02\21@131344 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I think that it's acrylic plastic (same as polymerized glue).
> It comes off with
> warm acetone. It is not harmful. I think that you can control
> it by changing the
> humidity while the glue cures (higher I think). E.g. putting
> the glued boxes in
> a large cardboard box that also contains a humid towel should
> do it as a test.

It is amazing how quickly the list comes with the answers to a
non-electrical question.

thanks guys!

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2007\02\21@151102 by Peter P.

picon face
Wouter van Ooijen <wouter <at> voti.nl> writes:

>
> > I think that it's acrylic plastic (same as polymerized glue).
> > It comes off with
> > warm acetone. It is not harmful. I think that you can control
> > it by changing the
> > humidity while the glue cures (higher I think). E.g. putting
> > the glued boxes in
> > a large cardboard box that also contains a humid towel should
> > do it as a test.
>
> It is amazing how quickly the list comes with the answers to a
> non-electrical question.
>
> thanks guys!
>
> Wouter van Ooijen
>

and it's even more amazing when one is taken literally without checking.
Apparently the high humidity trick will increase the white residue. Therefore
make it low humidity (don't know how - maybe keep a heater fan pointed at the
glued items)

http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/feneric/cyanoacrylate.html

Peter P.

2007\02\21@155849 by Jinx

face picon face
> It comes off with warm acetone

Good suggestion, although you have to be a little careful with
acetone.It takes just about everything off (silk-screening,
polyurethane, attacks case plastic etc) and also evaporates
so quickly that it's difficult to do a thorough job. Cotton-bud
approach rather than slosh it on with a rag

2007\02\21@231047 by John Chung

picon face
The white stuff is very common with Zap-A-Gap.

John


--- "Timothy J. Weber" <spam_OUTtwTakeThisOuTspamtimothyweber.org> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2007\02\22@052955 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


{Quote hidden}

But high humidity causes the CA glue to cure more quickly, e.g. a common trick is you gently breath on a glued joint to speed up curing, especialy if there is a little too much glue on the joint.  If the joint is made under very dry conditions, it will cure more slowly so vapour will be around for longer, so it's swings and roundabouts.

One thing that hasn't been mentioned if the use of an accelerator.  This is sprayed onto one half of the joint and causes the glue to cure almost instantly which should reduce any blooming problems to a minimum.

Regards

Mike



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2007\02\22@124635 by PicDude

flavicon
face
Ah yes... memories from my RC airplane past.  The white film forms when the
cyanoacrylate cures.  The best way to prevent this was to get some airflow
over the area during curing to move the fumes away.

-Neil.


On Wednesday 21 February 2007 10:25, Mike Harrison wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2007\02\22@154330 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face

On Feb 22, 2007, at 10:29 AM, PicDude wrote:

> The white film forms when the cyanoacrylate cures.

*I* wouldn't call the white film from CA curing "goo" for
most american definitions of the word "goo."  Are we sure
we're all talking about the same thing?

BillW

2007\02\22@161859 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> *I* wouldn't call the white film from CA curing "goo" for
> most american definitions of the word "goo."  Are we sure
> we're all talking about the same thing?

Yes, but maybe we were not raised using the same language...

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


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