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'[EE]: nixie tubes'
2001\02\28@112059 by Dal Wheeler

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Anyone know of a surplus source for some small nixie tubes?  I've just been
looking at some clocks based on these and got my fingers itching to try
something like that...  What kinds of longevities can be expected with these
kinds of displays?

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2001\02\28@130154 by mike

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On Wed, 28 Feb 2001 09:16:45 -0700, you wrote:

>Anyone know of a surplus source for some small nixie tubes?  I've just been
>looking at some clocks based on these and got my fingers itching to try
>something like that...  What kinds of longevities can be expected with these
>kinds of displays?
I have a list of suppliers on my site http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~wwl/nixie_sources.html

..as well as a complete nixie clock design including PCB artwork.
Ready-made PTH PCBs are also available.

If run within spec, typical tube life is 100Khours

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2001\02\28@131437 by Brian Aase

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If you're so inclined, a quick check on eBay shows 8 current
auctions for Nixie tubes of various sorts.

> Anyone know of a surplus source for some small nixie tubes?  I've just been
> looking at some clocks based on these and got my fingers itching to try
> something like that...  What kinds of longevities can be expected with these
> kinds of displays?
>
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>

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2001\02\28@162304 by P.C. Uiterlinden

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Dal Wheeler wrote:
>
> What kinds of longevities can be expected with these kinds of displays?

I built a clock with twelve nixie tubes in 1987 and it has been on ever
since. The tubes show no degredation yet and they where not new to start
with.

So these tubes have been working for at least 130k hours! Gee, time flies
like an arrow and fruit flies like banana.   :-)

Paul.

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2001\02\28@163337 by Harold M Hallikainen

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       The radio station I worked in in the early 1970's at a Nixie based clock
as part of a program automation system. The Nixie tubes lasted forever,
but the driver chips would fail constantly. Handling that high voltage
seemed to be a problem.
       Speaking of old technology, anyone remember the (RCA, I think) Numitron
display? It was a seven segment display using incandescent filaments. You
could use them just like an LED seven segment, but could not multiplex
them without adding a bunch of diodes.

Harold


On Wed, 28 Feb 2001 18:07:30 +0000 Mike Harrison <spam_OUTmikeTakeThisOuTspamWHITEWING.CO.UK>
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2001\02\28@180219 by Nigel Goodwin

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In message <.....20010228.132730.-237529.0.haroldhallikainenKILLspamspam@spam@juno.com>,> Harold M Hallikainen <haroldhallikainenspamKILLspamJUNO.COM> writes
>        Speaking of old technology, anyone remember the (RCA, I think) Numitron
>display? It was a seven segment display using incandescent filaments. You
>could use them just like an LED seven segment, but could not multiplex
>them without adding a bunch of diodes.

I can't say I remember the trade name, but when I was at Technical
College in 1973 I was involved in building a project using seven segment
filament displays. It was based on a simple block diagram, using three
displays with just the horizontal filaments used, and was a simple 'slot
machine'. It consisted of ring of three counters feeding each display,
fed from astable oscillators via bistable latches. The three displays
cycled round, and you had to press three buttons to light up a single
line to win, win or lose was indicated by bulbs fed from a combination
of AND and OR gates. This was built using only discrete components, and
had to be built on plain matrix board with all wiring and components on
the top of the board. The completed machine (with a transparent perspex
top was exhibited at the college open day!.
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2001\02\28@182738 by Dingoblue mail

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Have a look at the info from one Russian supplier it may be of some
assistance

Rex

http://www.rayelec.ch/gdd.htm
{Original Message removed}

2001\02\28@183350 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 12:57 PM 2/28/01 -0800, you wrote:
>        The radio station I worked in in the early 1970's at a Nixie based
clock
>as part of a program automation system. The Nixie tubes lasted forever,
>but the driver chips would fail constantly. Handling that high voltage
>seemed to be a problem.
>        Speaking of old technology, anyone remember the (RCA, I think)
Numitron
>display? It was a seven segment display using incandescent filaments. You
>could use them just like an LED seven segment, but could not multiplex
>them without adding a bunch of diodes.

Yup. My company was distributor briefly for the Japanese manufacturer of these
(they might have been clones or they may have made them for RCA). The Japanese
company is still around making LCD displays these days.

They had a special TTL chip to drive them (?7447??) something like that.

BTW, the life of the Nixes is dependent on how much current you put through
them. The Burroughs(??) segmented plasma displays were around after the
Nixies,
on gas pumps, but they have finally died out too.

Best regards,
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EraseMEspeffspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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2001\02\28@183741 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 08:59 AM 3/1/01 +0930, you wrote:
>Have a look at the info from one Russian supplier it may be of some
>assistance
>
>Rex
>
>http://www.rayelec.ch/gdd.htm

Amazing! But even the Russians have stopped making them, still
some stock. I wonder if the "pin for pin" 74141 replacement is the
bastardized Russian not-quite-0.1"-'cause-we're-metric spacing
that I've heard of?

Best regards,


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speffspamspam_OUTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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2001\02\28@193018 by Barry Gershenfeld

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>        Speaking of old technology, anyone remember the (RCA, I think) Numitron
>display? It was a seven segment display using incandescent filaments. You
>could use them just like an LED seven segment, but could not multiplex
>them without adding a bunch of diodes.
>
>Harold

A friend of mine built his first project, a digital clock, using
the Numitron tubes.  A counter, decoder, driver for each digit.

Actually, it was his second project.  His first attempt involved
building all the logic out of TRANSISTORS, then he got turned
onto TTL and scrapped all that.  I still have one of the discrete
counter boards and used to use it as a prop when giving basic
digital logic presentations.  (As in, "This chip here does what
this board over here did.")

This was 1972.  After I met him, he turned me on to TTL stuff.
My first project like this was almost a Nixie clock.  The
company (B&F) that I got the kit from took their clock and
added a timebase board, and voila...frequency counter.
Unfortunately the 180V for the displays came in contact
with the 5V for the logic...decimated the poor thing.  I
rebuilt it and learned ALL about logic and troubleshooting.

Barry

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2001\02\28@195114 by Max Toole

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In a message dated 2/28/2001 7:32:36 PM Eastern Standard Time,
@spam@barryKILLspamspamZMICRO.COM writes:

<< >        Speaking of old technology, anyone remember the (RCA, I think)
Numitron
>display? It was a seven segment display using incandescent filaments. You
>could use them just like an LED seven segment, but could not multiplex
>them without adding a bunch of diodes.
>
>Harold

A friend of mine built his first project, a digital clock, using
the Numitron tubes.  A counter, decoder, driver for each digit.

Actually, it was his second project.  His first attempt involved
building all the logic out of TRANSISTORS, then he got turned
onto TTL and scrapped all that.  I still have one of the discrete
counter boards and used to use it as a prop when giving basic
digital logic presentations.  (As in, "This chip here does what
this board over here did.")

This was 1972.  After I met him, he turned me on to TTL stuff.
My first project like this was almost a Nixie clock.  The
company (B&F) that I got the kit from took their clock and
added a timebase board, and voila...frequency counter.
Unfortunately the 180V for the displays came in contact
with the 5V for the logic...decimated the poor thing.  I
rebuilt it and learned ALL about logic and troubleshooting.

Barry
 >>
This is a great chuckle for me.  I graduated EE, 1960, and I very well
remember these evolutions.  Thanks for the memory.

I wonder if one can still buy Nixie tubes.  They were cool.

Max

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2001\02\28@233856 by Robert Francisco

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I think you might be thinking of Beckman. I still have a panel meter using
these plasma displays- the meter vendor stopped making units back in '93-
probably ran out of the displays.
I also have a 4.5 digit meter using these 7 segment filament.

RF
{Original Message removed}


'[EE]: nixie tubes'
2001\03\01@020705 by dr. Imre Bartfai
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AFAIK there is something in this direction at http://www.cosmodog.com

Imre

On Thu, 1 Mar 2001, Dingoblue mail wrote:

> Have a look at the info from one Russian supplier it may be of some
> assistance
>
> Rex
>
> http://www.rayelec.ch/gdd.htm
> {Original Message removed}

2001\03\01@044222 by mike

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On Wed, 28 Feb 2001 12:57:56 -0800, you wrote:

>        The radio station I worked in in the early 1970's at a Nixie based clock
>as part of a program automation system. The Nixie tubes lasted forever,
>but the driver chips would fail constantly. Handling that high voltage
>seemed to be a problem.
>        Speaking of old technology, anyone remember the (RCA, I think) Numitron
>display? It was a seven segment display using incandescent filaments. You
>could use them just like an LED seven segment, but could not multiplex
>them without adding a bunch of diodes.
For pictures of this and lots of other interesting obsolete display
and counting tubes, check out
http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~wwl/count.html

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2001\03\01@050815 by Roman Black

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Dal Wheeler wrote:
>
> Anyone know of a surplus source for some small nixie tubes?  I've just been
> looking at some clocks based on these and got my fingers itching to try
> something like that...  What kinds of longevities can be expected with these
> kinds of displays?


Nixes driven from a nice DC source will last just about
forever. The neon gas is inert, and if they are not
over-driven the worst cause of aging will probably
be the gas diffusion through the glass. :o)

Try an electronics junkyard or surplus dealer, they
may have 1960's equipment that has nixies in it.

If anyoe is still making/stocking new tubes I too would
like to know! :o)
-Roman

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2001\03\01@052311 by Roman Black

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P.C. Uiterlinden wrote:
>
> Dal Wheeler wrote:
> >
> > What kinds of longevities can be expected with these kinds of displays?
>
> I built a clock with twelve nixie tubes in 1987 and it has been on ever
> since. The tubes show no degredation yet and they where not new to start
> with.



Any pictures??? :o)
-Roman

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2001\03\01@065110 by mike

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<snip>
>This is a great chuckle for me.  I graduated EE, 1960, and I very well
>remember these evolutions.  Thanks for the memory.
>
>I wonder if one can still buy Nixie tubes.  They were cool.
yes - http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~wwl/nixie_sources.html

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2001\03\01@161638 by P.C. Uiterlinden

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Roman Black wrote:

> > I built a clock with twelve nixie tubes in 1987 and it has been on ever
> > since. The tubes show no degredation yet and they where not new to start
> > with.
>
> Any pictures??? :o)

Sorry, no. To busy (PIC of course, nowadays).

Paul.

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