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'[EE]: mu metal (was Re: Effects of a magnet on a P'
2001\10\05@135411 by Michael Vinson

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Robert Rolf wrote, in part:
>[shielding from a strong constant magnetic field] If you're really worried,
>just put the project in a metal box with a very high mu (magnetic
>conductance). Mu Metal sheilding is readily available from many supplier
>(CRT shielding).

Will this block a *DC* magnetic field? I have no experience with
"mu metal", and I'm wondering if it can block a constant magnetic
field (I can see how it might be better at blocking an AC field).

Of course, if you really, really want to shield your circuit from
a magnetic field, I suppose you could use the Meissner effect
and put it in a superconducting box! :-)

Michael

Thank you for reading my little posting.




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2001\10\05@140253 by Douglas Butler

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A copper box, or better yet a superconducting box would protect you from
an AC magnetic field.  A mu metal box protects you from a STATIC field.
It conducts the magnetic field around your circuit, rather that a copper
box that would conduct an electric current produced by a change in the
mag field.

Of course the mu metal box, being metal, also protects from an AC field
but perhaps not as well as copper.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\10\05@143002 by David VanHorn

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>
>Of course the mu metal box, being metal, also protects from an AC field
>but perhaps not as well as copper.

True. When the frequency gets above a couple kHz, copper is better.
The metals people can give you specific data for the alloy and thickness.
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2001\10\05@151203 by Olin Lathrop

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> Will this block a *DC* magnetic field? I have no experience with
> "mu metal", and I'm wondering if it can block a constant magnetic
> field (I can see how it might be better at blocking an AC field).

Mu metal shielding will certainly attenuate magnetic fields.  It's like a
shunt for magnetic flux.


********************************************************************
Olin Lathrop, embedded systems consultant in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, spam_OUTolinTakeThisOuTspamembedinc.com, http://www.embedinc.com

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2001\10\05@162809 by Lawrence Lile

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What's wrong with a plain ol' steel box?  Would not steel, being a fair
conductor and good magnetic material do an adequate job of shielding in all
but the worst situations?

-- Lawrence Lile

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