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'[EE]: measuring fluid flow in an automotive coolin'
2006\06\21@040152 by Gus S Calabrese

face picon face
My truck overheats when I am pulling a small load uphill.
I do not think it should overheat.  I am working on instrumenting
various parts of the cooling system.  I would like to insert some kind
of flow detection in the hose that leads to the top of the radiator.  
I would
like to get 3 or 4 bits of flow rate info.  Does not have to be  
terribly linear.

Any suggestions ?   How do piezoelectrics do in a 130 degree Celcius
wet environment ?


Gus S Calabrese   AGSC
Denver, CO
720 222 1309     303 908 7716 cell
I allow everything with  "spamcode2006"  in the subject or text to  
pass my spam filters


2006\06\21@173008 by Dave Lag

picon face
Gus S Calabrese wrote:
> My truck overheats when I am pulling a small load uphill.
> I do not think it should overheat.  I am working on instrumenting
> various parts of the cooling system.  I would like to insert some kind
> of flow detection in the hose that leads to the top of the radiator.  
> I would
> like to get 3 or 4 bits of flow rate info.  Does not have to be  
> terribly linear.
>
> Any suggestions ?   How do piezoelectrics do in a 130 degree Celcius
> wet environment ?
>
>
> Gus S Calabrese   AGSC
> Denver, CO
> 720 222 1309     303 908 7716 cell
> I allow everything with  "spamcode2006"  in the subject or text to  
> pass my spam filters
>
>
Don't forget the contribution of the tranny adding heat back into the
rad. Probably the reason towing kits have separate tranny coolers
(assuming automatic)

2006\06\21@190008 by peteHVAC

flavicon
face
Hello,
Check your clutch fan if it's bad no air flow through radiator.
If you have electric fans be sure there turning on.
The thermostat may not be opening all the way.
Most of the time you can see the change in flow through the radiator.
Does it look cruddy in there?.
Old hoses may collapse at higher RPM.
Slipping belt?
On the far out side if the belts have been replaced is the pump
turning in the right direction (seen this).
A lean condition or improper timing may get things hot.
Dirty radiator? Separate the fins a little to see.
How's the cap? Low pressure = steam = poor pumping + hot spots.
What load is the engine at? Half throttle floored?
Are you at low speed climbing the hill?

You may want to measure temperature in and out as well as flow.
For flow when the thermostat opens you could time how long the
hot coolant takes to get to the output. Not a specific flow rate but a good
idea of what's going on.

Sorry I can't help with the sensors or if this all is obvious but better
said than not.

Thanks, Pete

{Original Message removed}

2006\06\21@230008 by PicDude

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face
I would expect that you'd easily find something that can withstand 130 deg-C.  
Check out places like http://www.gemssensors.com .

Otherwise, could you make it like a mass-air sensor? -- ie: resistive heating
element that gets cooled by the fluid flow.

BTW, flow is probably not the issue if the cooling system works decently when
lightly loaded on level roads.  Too much flow rate can sometimes be worse as
it does not have enough contact time with the hot engine parts to absorb
heat.  You should probably be looking at oil temps and transmission temps
instead, and possibly using an oil cooler and/or transmission fluid cooler.  
If the cooling system really is not operating up to par, then a better
(multi-core) radiator may help.  A quick experiment to see if the cooling
system is really the primary issue is to use a mixture with more water, and
add some water-wetter.  See if that makes a difference.

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Wednesday 21 June 2006 03:01, Gus S Calabrese wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\06\21@234646 by Martin K

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face
My head says maybe he has a blockage in one (or more) of the radiator
passages. That would easily keep the radiator from working as it should.
--
Martin K

PicDude wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2006\06\22@041927 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
> My truck overheats when I am pulling a small load uphill.
> I do not think it should overheat.

You don't say how old the truck is, but my bet would be you need a new
radiator core, or perhaps they fitted an undersized core to keep the price
down.

2006\06\22@090309 by VULCAN20

picon face
Check the front of the radiator to see if it is clean.  I have seen them
covered with bugs, cottonwood tree fluff and other such Items.  One
event had a piece of clear plastic that covered about 75 % of the
radiator surface.


Martin K wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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