Searching \ for '[EE]: infra red camera query' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=infra+red+camera
Search entire site for: 'infra red camera query'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE]: infra red camera query'
2002\10\22@021719 by Shaun Wright

picon face
As far as I know, you just need a very bright Infra Red Light. But I know
little on this subject so I have taken the liberty of posting your question
to the PICList mailing list.

---
James Newton, webhost piclist.com (former Admin #3)
spam_OUTjamesnewtonTakeThisOuTspampiclist.com 1-619-652-0593 fax:1-208-279-8767
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

{Original Message removed}

2002\10\22@030840 by Jonathan Johnson

flavicon
face
Hi Shaun,
I am from a security background so have experience playing with this sort of
thing at the lowest competitive cost. Some cameras are specially designed to
be extra sensitive to IR energy(quite pricey tho) but most of them will
respond to IR illumination unless they have an IR cutting film on the CCD
chip, look for board cameras that have a low light responsiveness for a best
result at lowest cost something in the 0.1 lux range will serve you well
then check the specs to see where in the IR spectrum the particular CCD is
most responsive and base your illumination on this. There is not too much to
it past this until you get into the high end IR and thermal imaging. Best of
luck.

Regards,

Jonathan


{Original Message removed}

2002\10\22@095831 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
> i am trying to find out how to make my black and white board
> cameras see in
> total darkness. they only have to see at a range of 2 feet but must see
> clearly in darkness. what do i need for this project?, some of my cameras
> already have ir but dont seem very bright so can i replace irs
> with stronger
> version. the cameras in question are black and white ,with no
> audio and will
> be used to monitor bird boxes. thanks for your time and help.

       I have found that some cameras are more sensitive to IR then others. Is the
camera in question marketed as "IR"? If not it's possible it has an IR
filter (although generally black and white cameras don't have IR filters,
some do). Logitech Quickcams (those video conferencing cameras) are
excellent in their IR response once you remove the IR filter, a IR remote is
often enough to light up a room with one of those babies. TTYL

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservKILLspamspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\10\22@160131 by Matt Heck

flavicon
face
When selecting IR LEDs, pay attention to the divergence (beam
angle).  Get something that will match your lens's viewing
angle.  One configuration I have used is a "halo" of LEDs
arranged in a ring around the lens of the camera.  Edmund
Scientific and a few others also sell some LARGE infrared
sources that might be appropriate.

With CCD imagers, lowering the frame-rate will increase per-
frame light gain (think of it as the amount of time you're
letting a capacitor charge) but of course this may yield
motion blur.

If the object is stills only, an IR strobe may be appropriate.

Cooling the imager will also improve IR response in many cases
(actual far-infrared [thermal] cameras are ALWAYS actively
cooled, as I recall).  The idea part for this is a cascade
peltier junciton, which looks sort of like a pyramid of three
or four stacked squares, the smallest one of which goes on the
back of the imager and will cool the hell out of it, assuming
the large side has a decent heat sink and fan.  Either CMOS
or CCD shows significantly more improvement than the other
when actively cooled, but I am not dead sure about which.

One other thing.  Since your application is nature monitoring,
keep in mind that many animals cannot see monochromatic red
light, so you may be able to use something like a deep red
filter over a floodlight and still get the results you want.
(This is also an effective, though not very sporting, way to
hunt for food in an emergency.)

Cheers,
  Matt

> {Original Message removed}

2002\10\22@173723 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
>>
When selecting IR LEDs, pay attention to the divergence (beam
angle).  Get something that will match your lens's viewing
angle.  One configuration I have used is a "halo" of LEDs
arranged in a ring around the lens of the camera.  Edmund
Scientific and a few others also sell some LARGE infrared
sources that might be appropriate.
<<

Why not use an ordinary LEB (light emitting bulb).  These things are
actually quite efficient and reliable at above-visible wavelengths.  Start
with an ordinary bulb and lower the voltage just below where you can't see
the filament lit anymore.


*****************************************************************
Embed Inc, embedded system specialists in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, http://www.embedinc.com

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\10\22@184410 by Matt Heck

flavicon
face
Neat!  That makes perfect sense, but it never occurred to me!

That would be a pretty cool surveillence trick, too-- have the
"off" position for an incandescent ceiling light actually just
lower the filament temperature to an IR-only range.  Hmmm!

--Matt

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email EraseMElistservspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\10\22@184615 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
> When selecting IR LEDs, pay attention to the divergence (beam
> angle).  Get something that will match your lens's viewing
> angle.  One configuration I have used is a "halo" of LEDs
> arranged in a ring around the lens of the camera.  Edmund
> Scientific and a few others also sell some LARGE infrared
> sources that might be appropriate.
> <<
>
> Why not use an ordinary LEB (light emitting bulb).  These things are
> actually quite efficient and reliable at above-visible wavelengths.  Start
> with an ordinary bulb and lower the voltage just below where you can't see
> the filament lit anymore.

       That is a REALLY good idea, never even considered it. Plus, with such a low
voltage across the bulb it will probably last as long as an LED! TTYL

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\10\22@215433 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
> thank you for taking the time to reply to my quiery. i think
> cameras had ir
> added to them at later date but on side of camera it says "ccir",
> how can i
> tell if filter fitted and how can i remove if so?.

       Well it all depends on how much your value your camera and how good a
"hacker" you are! :) I must mention though that many black and white cameras
have no IR filter. The filter itself is usually located in the lens
assembly, glued to the inside. It is generally quite easy to take the
cammera apart, screw out the lens and see if there is a filter. It is
usually glass and with a slight blue tint. Be careful when you do this
though, you will be exposing the CCD and even one dust particle will show
up, and will be hard to remove (ask me how I know...). Good luck, TTYL

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email @spam@listservKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\10\23@131201 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
*>Why not use an ordinary LEB (light emitting bulb).  These things are
*>actually quite efficient and reliable at above-visible wavelengths.  Start
*>with an ordinary bulb and lower the voltage just below where you can't see
*>the filament lit anymore.

Actually maximum useful near IR emission occurs when the filament is
glowing deep red.

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
KILLspampiclist-unsubscribe-requestKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2002 , 2003 only
- Today
- New search...