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PICList Thread
'[EE]: controlling power supplies'
2001\12\10@115217 by ashly Dearden

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Is it a bad thing to use a solid state relay to control the power to a
switching power supply or is a mechanical relay a better device


-Ash

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2001\12\10@120413 by David VanHorn

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At 04:40 PM 12/10/01 +0000, ashly Dearden wrote:
>Is it a bad thing to use a solid state relay to control the power to a
>switching power supply or is a mechanical relay a better device

As long as they are rated for the surge current on connection, either type
should be fine.
The solid state type should be a bit better at this than the mechanical,
but I'm not sure that it would be significant.  Your PC power switch is
relay-like contacts.

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2001\12\10@123606 by Kirk Lovewell

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I've used an SSR on a reliability test fixture to cycle power to a 60W
switcher, ran for a year or so turning the switcher on and off every 15 min;
had no problems.

Kirk

>
> Is it a bad thing to use a solid state relay to control the power to a
> switching power supply or is a mechanical relay a better device
>
>
> -Ash

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2001\12\10@143749 by Andre Abelian

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Ash,

Inside of solid state relay is a triac with opto-coupler on input with
Ziner diode thru a resister. Triacs are always better. mechanical relay
Will generate spike RFI it is bad for sensitive electronics.

Andre Abelian


Is it a bad thing to use a solid state relay to control the power to a
switching power supply or is a mechanical relay a better device


-Ash

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2001\12\10@150044 by chris

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Just be sure to use a zero-cross firing opto, otherwise you will still get
random spikes on switching.

Chris
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2001\12\13@095350 by electme

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how about a pic to sense zero crossing that switches a snubberless
triac.They have higher di/dt for surge current & no moving parts , better
reliability
glen

At 03:11 pm Monday 10/12/2001 -0500, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\12\13@141517 by Eisermann, Phil [Ridg/CO]

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The suggestion was to use a zero crossing opto; why do you need a PIC?

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2001\12\14@063611 by mike

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There can be reasons for using a PIC for simple apps like this - if
the whole thing is line powered (i.e. no transformer), you need to
keep triac drive current down to reduce the size of the dropper cap,
so you want to use a narrow firing pulse. If your load is inductive,
you may need to issue several pulses to guarantee reliable firing due
to current phase shift, therefore an 'intelligent' PIC based solution
can sometimes be worthwhile even for apparently trival apps, and the
cost of a 'C508 is hardly going to break the bank!


On Thu, 13 Dec 2001 14:12:48 -0500, you wrote:

>The suggestion was to use a zero crossing opto; why do you need a PIC?
>
>> {Original Message removed}

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