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'[EE]: What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\11\06@195855 by hard Prosser

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(Subject changed to [EE]:)

Sounds strange - I'd always assumed that the exposed bulb type operated via
a transformer.
I live in one of the main "Xmas Light" areas of Chch. and over the last few
years there
has been some vandalism of my neighbours lights resulting in exposed,
broken filaments.
Maybe I should tell him to leave them turned on!
(Or change to a string of neons operating at 2kV)
RP




> I'm just not too sure on the safety of the system, Jinx.
> The bulbs are connected directly to AC so they would need
> suitable physical protection - how have you organised that?
>
> RP

I presume this is what you're talking about -

The strings used where sheathed in clear heat-shrink tubing. But
many 240V strings available off the shelf don't have even that
protection - the bulbs are bare and as they have passed all the
regs and been deemed fit for sale I guess you take the same risk
that you would with any exposed conductor. Obviously it's not the
intention to make something dangerous, but accidents and stupid
human tricks do happen

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2002\11\06@203408 by Jinx

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> Maybe I should tell him to leave them turned on!
> (Or change to a string of neons operating at 2kV)
> RP

There's LEDs. If you like fiddly soldering and heat-shrinking

You could fuse the string but that wouldn't protect much against
personal shock, and I don't know if an RCD would pass the
switching very well. And there's always buying sensibly, ie not
from, well, you can imagine where they're made and who sells
them........ There's cheap, and then there's cheap and nasty

A string of parallel bulbs would be better, and then you could run
it from 6V. I don't particularly like series arrangements.

I remember dad, always slightly the worse for wear after several
Xmas tipples, doing the annual tradition of trying to find which bulb
had blown using some very un-Christmassy language. I'm surprised
Santa didn't come back and nuke us

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2002\11\06@204258 by Jim

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  "You could fuse the string but that wouldn't
   protect much against personal shock,"

Isn't this a *perfect* application for one of
those "new fangled" plug-in-at-the-outlet GFI
devices?

Or are they only available to us residing in N. America
who use the civilised house-mains voltage of 120 V?

RF Jim


{Original Message removed}

2002\11\06@210509 by hard Prosser

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Yep - That's my job these days - with pretty much the same results!
It always seems that there are 2 bulbs blown for some reason, so doing a
progressive swap just doesn't find the problem.

I'm always a bit wary these days about where the tinsel on the tree sits
also - more than the lights can light up otherwise!
On the other hand, with a suitable exciter, electroluminecent tinsel could
be a big hit.

RP


I remember dad, always slightly the worse for wear after several
Xmas tipples, doing the annual tradition of trying to find which bulb
had blown using some very un-Christmassy language. I'm surprised
Santa didn't come back and nuke us

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2002\11\07@031540 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jim [SMTP:EraseMEjvpollspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTDALLAS.NET]
> Sent: Thursday, November 07, 2002 1:42 AM
> To:   PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject:      Re: [EE]: What have you designed using PIC?
>
>    "You could fuse the string but that wouldn't
>     protect much against personal shock,"
>
> Isn't this a *perfect* application for one of
> those "new fangled" plug-in-at-the-outlet GFI
> devices?
>
> Or are they only available to us residing in N. America
> who use the civilised house-mains voltage of 120 V?
>
No, they are also available in the parts of the world where you can plug
high power devices into the mains as well :o)

Mike

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2002\11\07@091854 by Jim

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Gosh, you could not tell I was kidding
when I wrote that little 'jab'?

The use of 120V "mains" is no more or no less
'civilized' than the use any other "mains" voltage
in a home.

I *do* think that the two-blade and two-blade/one-prong
"power plugs" we use here in N. America are badly in
need of re-design - as it is too easy for a child to
come in contact with the mains voltage. A much better
mechanism would prevent the exposure of the energized
metallic blades as a plug is inserted *or* removed and
I'm sure this would also work to reduce the occurance
of fires in the home (and office!).

To *not* consider a re-design with safety in mind, I
think, is uncivilized ...

RF Jim


----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael Rigby-Jones" <KILLspammrjonesKILLspamspamNORTELNETWORKS.COM>
To: <RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Thursday, November 07, 2002 2:14 AM
Subject: Re: [EE]: What have you designed using PIC?


> > {Original Message removed}

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