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'[EE]: Thermoelectric coolers...'
2001\01\26@175140 by Bill Westfield

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Be aware that the semiconductor thermoelectric coolers are VERY inefficient.
For every watt of heat energy (can I do that?) you absorb from the "cold"
side of the cooler, you need to dissipate something like 10 watts from a
heatsink/fan on the "hot" side (~10% efficient ?)  There were some SCATHING
reviews of the CPU coolers marketted containing such devices (to keep your
CPU cold, you have to heat up the rest of your computer quite a bit!), and
the "cold drink cooler" application is pretty iffy as well.  The devices
shine when you have to get something very cold but dissipate very little
heat - say cooling an image sensor to reduce noisee, or getting low temps
for far-infrared (heat) imagers.  A normal refridgerator  does MUCH, MUCH
better for removing large amounts of heat at not-so-low temperatures (since
they're heat pumps, the "efficiency" is much greater than 100%)

BillW

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2001\01\29@031730 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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{Quote hidden}

Absolutely, I have tried to explain this to many people who see TEC's as a
miracle solution for their cooling problem.  My first PIC project was a PID
controler that used a TEC to wavelength stabilise a laser.  A big problem
was the huge efficiency jump when switching from heat to cool, the loop
gains had to be modified depending on direction of heat flow to obtain the
fastest and most stable response.

Mike

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2001\01\29@101353 by Shawn Yates

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So if your goal is to actualy HEAT something, TEC is a good way to go?



-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Rigby-Jones [.....mrjonesKILLspamspam.....NORTELNETWORKS.COM]
Sent: Monday, January 29, 2001 3:18 AM
To: EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [EE]: Thermoelectric coolers...


{Quote hidden}

Absolutely, I have tried to explain this to many people who see TEC's as a
miracle solution for their cooling problem.  My first PIC project was a PID
controler that used a TEC to wavelength stabilise a laser.  A big problem
was the huge efficiency jump when switching from heat to cool, the loop
gains had to be modified depending on direction of heat flow to obtain the
fastest and most stable response.

Mike

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2001\01\29@135544 by mike

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On Mon, 29 Jan 2001 10:13:20 -0500, you wrote:

>So if your goal is to actualy HEAT something, TEC is a good way to go?
If energy use is absolutely critical, and you have somewhere to dump
the 'cold', possibly but it would be a pretty slim advantage.


>{Original Message removed}

2001\01\30@030717 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Shawn Yates [SMTP:KILLspamsyatesKILLspamspamCARETECHNOLOGIES.COM]
> Sent: Monday, January 29, 2001 3:13 PM
> To:   RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject:      Re: [EE]: Thermoelectric coolers...
>
> So if your goal is to actualy HEAT something, TEC is a good way to go?
>
>
Well, it would certainly do the job, but there seems little point when they
are so much more expensive than e.g. a power resistor! (unless you need to
cool something at the same time of course :o)

Mike

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2001\01\30@035150 by Vasile Surducan

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On Tue, 30 Jan 2001, Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:

> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Shawn Yates [SMTP:TakeThisOuTsyatesEraseMEspamspam_OUTCARETECHNOLOGIES.COM]
> > Sent: Monday, January 29, 2001 3:13 PM
> > To:   RemoveMEPICLISTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> > Subject:      Re: [EE]: Thermoelectric coolers...
> >
> > So if your goal is to actualy HEAT something, TEC is a good way to go?
> >
> >
> Well, it would certainly do the job, but there seems little point when they
> are so much more expensive than e.g. a power resistor! (unless you need to
> cool something at the same time of course :o)
>
> Mike

 I'm totaly agree, peltier heating/coolers are excellent but only for
both operation: freezing AND heating, they have a poor efficiency but they
are the only one solution ( as I know ) for bidirectional thermostat
usage.

Vasile

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2001\01\30@061030 by Russell McMahon

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>   I'm totaly agree, peltier heating/coolers are excellent but only for
> both operation: freezing AND heating, they have a poor efficiency but they
> are the only one solution ( as I know ) for bidirectional thermostat
> usage.


The Peltier device has the great advantage that it can be DRIVEN up or down
to maintain a control loop.
Most systems allow you to drive them UP but cool down passively so if you
overshoot you are at the whim of the cooling characteristics. With active
drive you can correct for variations in ambient etc.



   Russell McMahon

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