Searching \ for '[EE]: The joys of electronics' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=joys+electronics
Search entire site for: 'The joys of electronics'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE]: The joys of electronics'
2002\08\23@160329 by Benjamin Bromilow

flavicon
face
It's good to share.... :)
Just found a well out of date disposable camera in my "bits" bin so I took
it apart.....
I've still got a large area of my vision that I can't see because the flash
went off *whilst I was 2" away from it*....
Then I managed to put my demolition fingers across the charged capacitor...
I'd forgotten how painful that was even on small flashguns! Perhaps it's
true that with age you stop being able to take the things the same way you
could in your youth.....
Then I had the bright idea of shorting out the now mostly empty capacitor
using a screwdriver!!
Sorry to say but now all the magic smoke is gone (with a loud bang which has
given me rather impressive tinnitis) and the camera no longer works....

Now isn't that so much more fun than just throwing it away!!!

Ben

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spam_OUTlistservTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@164742 by Brent Brown

picon face
I did all the same wrong things in the same order! Sad thing though I
was fixing the camera for a friend, and the original fault was just a
loose spring but ended up killing the whole thing.

{Quote hidden}

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, Hamilton, New Zealand
Ph/fax: +64 7 849 0069
Mobile/txt: 025 334 069
eMail:  brent.brownspamKILLspamclear.net.nz

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservKILLspamspam.....mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@170026 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> It's good to share.... :)
> Just found a well out of date disposable camera in my "bits" bin so I took
> it apart.....
> I've still got a large area of my vision that I can't see because the
flash
> went off *whilst I was 2" away from it*....
> Then I managed to put my demolition fingers across the charged
capacitor...
> I'd forgotten how painful that was even on small flashguns! Perhaps it's
> true that with age you stop being able to take the things the same way you
> could in your youth.....
> Then I had the bright idea of shorting out the now mostly empty capacitor
> using a screwdriver!!
> Sorry to say but now all the magic smoke is gone (with a loud bang which
has
> given me rather impressive tinnitis) and the camera no longer works....
>
> Now isn't that so much more fun than just throwing it away!!!

Ever put a thin piece of carbon like a pencil lead across those terminals?
Now, I tell ya, that's even more impressive than the screwdriver.  I had a
bit of tintinitis for a while, myself after that one.  And the flash stuck
around on my retinas for a while too.  Strange thing is, though, that the
flash kept working after that, and a screwdriver without much trouble.  You
sure you didn't short something other than the cap leads?  Like short some
other part of the circuit into the high-voltage circuit?

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email EraseMElistservspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@180730 by Jim

flavicon
face
 "Ever put a thin piece of carbon like a pencil
  lead across those terminals?

Not yet ... maybe this evening! (I've got a whole
box of new wooden pencils too!)

"RF" Jim


   "Our ability to manufacture fraud has exceeded
    our  ability to detect it."

    - Al Pacino as Viktor Taransky in the movie 'Simone'*


  *Simone, it turns out, stands for:  "SIMulation ONE"





{Original Message removed}

2002\08\23@181355 by Jinx

face picon face
> Ben

The eyepatch and bandaged fingers are really going to
inspire confidence in you as an obgyn. A nice touch would
be a soot-blackened face and a smoking Don King hair-do

Please don't tell us you also do home repairs on the ultrasound
scanner and EKG machines too ;-)

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@181559 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
>   "Ever put a thin piece of carbon like a pencil
>    lead across those terminals?
>
> Not yet ... maybe this evening! (I've got a whole
> box of new wooden pencils too!)

I did mean from a mechanical pencil, but those might work too.

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email @spam@listservKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@182230 by Jim

flavicon
face
2H or HB -

.5, .7 or .9 mm?

RF Jim

   "Our ability to manufacture fraud has exceeded
    our  ability to detect it."

    - Al Pacino as Viktor Taransky in the movie 'Simone'


{Original Message removed}

2002\08\23@183449 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> 2H or HB -
>
> .5, .7 or .9 mm?

IIRC it was .5mm H or maybe HB.  Are you actually planning to try this?

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email KILLspamlistservKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@183859 by Jim

flavicon
face
Yup.

RF Jim

   "Our ability to manufacture fraud has exceeded
    our  ability to detect it."

    - Al Pacino as Viktor Taransky in the movie 'Simone'



{Original Message removed}

2002\08\23@184952 by Benjamin Bromilow

flavicon
face
> Please don't tell us you also do home repairs on the ultrasound
> scanner and EKG machines too ;-)
>

Alas no, they know me much too well at work........ If you ever hear....
"put the screwdriver down and step away from the scanner...."
you know it's one blink and I'm in town :)

Ben

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@185000 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> Yup.

Well, then, here's my experience on the subject:  First there was the
sroting it with the metal nose of a mechanical pencil, which produced a
moderate snap, as I'm sure you can imagine.

Then, for some reason, I got the bright idea of trying shorting it with the
pencil lead, expecting nothing to happen due to the higher resistance in the
carbon of the pencil lead.  Well, instead, it superheated, I guess, because
it went off like a fuse, and gave a bit of a flash, and quite a pop.

Good luck,

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spamBeGonelistservspamBeGonespammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@185922 by Charles Craft

picon face
Q: What did the redneck say just before he hurt / killt himself?

A: Hey ya'll, watch this!


----- Original Message -----
From: Brendan Moran <TakeThisOuTbmoranEraseMEspamspam_OUTMILLENNIUM.CA>
To: <RemoveMEPICLISTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Friday, August 23, 2002 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: [EE]: The joys of electronics


> > Yup.
>
> Well, then, here's my experience on the subject:  First there was the
> sroting it with the metal nose of a mechanical pencil, which produced a
> moderate snap, as I'm sure you can imagine.
>
> Then, for some reason, I got the bright idea of trying shorting it with
the
> pencil lead, expecting nothing to happen due to the higher resistance in
the
> carbon of the pencil lead.  Well, instead, it superheated, I guess,
because
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email EraseMElistservspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@190810 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> Q: What did the redneck say just before he hurt / killt himself?
>
> A: Hey ya'll, watch this!

Until you've vapourized a component worth more than $.50, you aren't really
an electronics/electrical engineer.

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservEraseMEspamEraseMEmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\23@191015 by Jim

flavicon
face
Cool ...


I was doing Engineering Production support on the
Panavia Nose mounted RADAR for the Tornado Aircraft
on the LRU 2 GMR (Ground Mapping RADAR) transmitter
back in it's early production run at TI -

- this unit's electronics for the power supply (-30,000
some odd volts for the *large* TWT amplifier's cathode
supply) which was bathed in Silicone Oil.

One of the test sets (for that *large* TWT) had an
access cover comprised of a 1" thick clear Plexiglass
cover over what was called the 'floating deck' board
(holding the grid control circuitry - this was a
grided TWT!) WHICH sat at that -30,000 some odd volt
potential ... this poor little board contained the
usual 5V TTL logic (popular at the time!) plus some
other odds and ends such as BITE (Built In Test
Equipment) circuits and the grid supply and control
circuity - oh, and the filament supply (after all,
this was a vacuum tube!).

Every so often if the techs didn't process the oil
(it had a propensity for absorbing atmospheric
moisture as the test set was not sealed!) an arc
would occur and take out several components.

One particular part was a 2 Watt carbon comp resistor
(don't now remember it's purpose) whose only remains
would be to bent leads (no body) aching into the board!
The sound when this occured was a muffled WHUMP! from
within the oil - and not much of a flash ...

"RF" Jim

   "Our ability to manufacture fraud has exceeded
    our  ability to detect it."

    - Al Pacino as Viktor Taransky in the movie 'Simone'



{Original Message removed}

2002\08\23@193055 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> One particular part was a 2 Watt carbon comp resistor
> (don't now remember it's purpose) whose only remains
> would be to bent leads (no body) aching into the board!
> The sound when this occured was a muffled WHUMP! from
> within the oil - and not much of a flash ...

Sounds like pretty well the same kind of "failure".  Enjoy your carbon
vapour ;)

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservspam_OUTspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\24@060946 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Fri, 23 Aug 2002, Brendan Moran wrote:

>> Q: What did the redneck say just before he hurt / killt himself?
>>
>> A: Hey ya'll, watch this!
>
>Until you've vapourized a component worth more than $.50, you aren't really
>an electronics/electrical engineer.

I always though you are that when you STOP.

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
RemoveMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestTakeThisOuTspamspammitvma.mit.edu


2002\08\24@060956 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Fri, 23 Aug 2002, Jim wrote:

>  "Ever put a thin piece of carbon like a pencil
>   lead across those terminals?
>
>Not yet ... maybe this evening! (I've got a whole
>box of new wooden pencils too!)

Wear welder's goggles and don't get too close. The carbon will splatter
your face black.

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamspamspamBeGonemitvma.mit.edu


2002\08\24@070111 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Fri, 23 Aug 2002, Jim wrote:

>2H or HB -

0.7mm 4B works best ;-) (almost pure pressed graphite carbon)

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
RemoveMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu


2002\08\24@114254 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
> On Fri, 23 Aug 2002, Brendan Moran wrote:
>
> >> Q: What did the redneck say just before he hurt / killt himself?
> >>
> >> A: Hey ya'll, watch this!
> >
> >Until you've vapourized a component worth more than $.50, you
> aren't really
> >an electronics/electrical engineer.
>
> I always though you are that when you STOP.

       Does a bang and a lot of smoke count? I've never actually completely
vaporized a part... (feeling disappointed and inadequate now) :( TTYL

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
piclist-unsubscribe-requestSTOPspamspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu


2002\08\24@142124 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
At 10:47 AM 24/08/2002 -0400, you wrote:
> > On Fri, 23 Aug 2002, Brendan Moran wrote:
> >
> > >> Q: What did the redneck say just before he hurt / killt himself?
> > >>
> > >> A: Hey ya'll, watch this!
> > >
> > >Until you've vapourized a component worth more than $.50, you
> > aren't really
> > >an electronics/electrical engineer.
> >
> > I always though you are that when you STOP.
>
>         Does a bang and a lot of smoke count? I've never actually completely
>vaporized a part... (feeling disappointed and inadequate now) :( TTYL

Yeah, I think that counts ;)

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
spamBeGonepiclist-unsubscribe-requestSTOPspamspamEraseMEmitvma.mit.edu


2002\08\24@142933 by Nelson Hochberg

flavicon
face
> On Fri, 23 Aug 2002, Brendan Moran wrote:
>
> >> Q: What did the redneck say just before he hurt / killt himself?
> >>
> >> A: Hey ya'll, watch this!
> >
> >Until you've vapourized a component worth more than $.50, you
> aren't really
> >an electronics/electrical engineer.
>
> I always though you are that when you STOP.

       Does a bang and a lot of smoke count? I've never actually completely
vaporized a part... (feeling disappointed and inadequate now) :( TTYL

Everyone should have goals, dreams and aspirations.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
KILLspampiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamBeGonespammitvma.mit.edu


2002\08\26@102810 by llile

flavicon
face
Well, last week we finished a protptype of a new compact oven, with fancy
LCD controls, a nice microprocessor, and a lot of teeth-grinding work. One
of our UL test technicians was just taking the first prototype into the UL
lab to begin the rigorous UL tests.  I had worked a week, one night the
night through, to complete this one handbuilt prototype on time.  The
first test involves running the unit for 50 cycles at 20% overvoltage,
which is 144 volts.  She calmly misread the meters and hooked this
hard-won prototype to 244 volts.  The heating elements got so bright I
could see them across the room, just before the bang.  Ever since then,
the tech has been called "240 Volt Marsha"

--Lawrence






Nelson Hochberg <EraseMEnelsonspamEraseMENOSUFFERING.COM>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <@spam@PICLIST@spam@spamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
08/24/02 01:06 PM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     spamBeGonePICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE]: The joys of electronics


{Quote hidden}

       Does a bang and a lot of smoke count? I've never actually
completely
vaporized a part... (feeling disappointed and inadequate now) :( TTYL

Everyone should have goals, dreams and aspirations.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
.....piclist-unsubscribe-requestspam_OUTspammitvma.mit.edu

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@112926 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 09:26 AM 8/26/02 -0500, you wrote:
>   She calmly misread the meters and hooked this
>hard-won prototype to 244 volts.  The heating elements got so bright I
>could see them across the room, just before the bang.  Ever since then,
>the tech has been called "240 Volt Marsha"

Marsha, Marsha, Marsha...  ;-)

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
TakeThisOuTspeff.....spamTakeThisOuTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com
9/11 United we Stand

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@141254 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Mon, 26 Aug 2002 TakeThisOuTllileKILLspamspamspamSALTONUSA.COM wrote:

>Well, last week we finished a protptype of a new compact oven, with fancy
>LCD controls, a nice microprocessor, and a lot of teeth-grinding work. One
>of our UL test technicians was just taking the first prototype into the UL
>lab to begin the rigorous UL tests.  I had worked a week, one night the
>night through, to complete this one handbuilt prototype on time.  The
>first test involves running the unit for 50 cycles at 20% overvoltage,
>which is 144 volts.  She calmly misread the meters and hooked this
>hard-won prototype to 244 volts.  The heating elements got so bright I
>could see them across the room, just before the bang.  Ever since then,
>the tech has been called "240 Volt Marsha"

ROFL.

Otoh, is there a particularly good reason for running UL tests on a
prototype (should not be run on pre-series units - usually the first 10
manufactured using the final factory preocedures and jigs) ?

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@141849 by Barry Gershenfeld

face picon face
>>         Does a bang and a lot of smoke count? I've never actually completely
>>vaporized a part... (feeling disappointed and inadequate now) :( TTYL
>
>Yeah, I think that counts ;)

Turn on board.
Nothing unusual happens...for awhile...
BANG!
Huh?  Look at board, oh, there is a pair of leads
where there used to be a part.
Then,
the sound of something bouncing off the counter across the room.
Go retreive part.  It's the can from the electrolytic capacitor.

In an unrelated explosion, you know how you can spot check
a board, and how the electrolytics always have their negative
lead soldered to the ground plane?   Except, not on
the negative supply :)

Barry

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@143524 by llile

flavicon
face
We run UL tests on various things from rudest prototypes to full
production units.  UL cares if the construction is the same as will be
done in production, or that we document and test any changes from the
prototype to the real production unit that are "signifigant" in thier
opinion.

We have run UL procedures on units where the whole chassis was made in our
sheet metal shop, and all of the plastic parts were SLA, and all of the
electronics were hand built by me.

In an ideal world, we run a pre-UL unofficial test on these rude proto's,
then fine tune things and get the factory to make the real UL test units
which will fly through UL like a greased armadillo heading for the middle
of the road.

UL likes production units best of all, of course.

--Lawrence






"Peter L. Peres" <.....plpspamRemoveMEACTCOM.CO.IL>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <RemoveMEPICLISTspamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
08/26/02 12:57 PM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     spamBeGonePICLIST@spam@spamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE]: The joys of electronics


On Mon, 26 Aug 2002 TakeThisOuTllilespamspamSALTONUSA.COM wrote:

>Well, last week we finished a protptype of a new compact oven, with fancy
>LCD controls, a nice microprocessor, and a lot of teeth-grinding work.
One
>of our UL test technicians was just taking the first prototype into the
UL
>lab to begin the rigorous UL tests.  I had worked a week, one night the
>night through, to complete this one handbuilt prototype on time.  The
>first test involves running the unit for 50 cycles at 20% overvoltage,
>which is 144 volts.  She calmly misread the meters and hooked this
>hard-won prototype to 244 volts.  The heating elements got so bright I
>could see them across the room, just before the bang.  Ever since then,
>the tech has been called "240 Volt Marsha"

ROFL.

Otoh, is there a particularly good reason for running UL tests on a
prototype (should not be run on pre-series units - usually the first 10
manufactured using the final factory preocedures and jigs) ?

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@171620 by Nelson Hochberg

flavicon
face
>>         Does a bang and a lot of smoke count? I've never actually
completely
>>vaporized a part... (feeling disappointed and inadequate now) :( TTYL
>
>Yeah, I think that counts ;)

Does moving the power switch and thermostat on a window air conditioner
resulting in three city blocks going dead count?  Just did that this
morning.

Actually I think it was a coincidence since the breaker popped, but if it
does count -- I DID IT.

Actually if the police or power company ask you, I had nothing to do with
it.

Name withheld

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@172719 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> >>         Does a bang and a lot of smoke count? I've never actually
> completely
> >>vaporized a part... (feeling disappointed and inadequate now) :( TTYL
> >
> >Yeah, I think that counts ;)
>
> Does moving the power switch and thermostat on a window air conditioner
> resulting in three city blocks going dead count?  Just did that this
> morning.

LOL

> Actually I think it was a coincidence since the breaker popped, but if it
> does count -- I DID IT.

I don't know if that one counts...  Adjusting a knob is somewhat different
from wiring something in wrong, giving it too much voltage/current etc...
But top marks for effect, that's for sure!  I've never managed any more than
1 house, myself.

> Actually if the police or power company ask you, I had nothing to do with
> it.

Who?

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@181438 by Nelson Hochberg

flavicon
face
{Quote hidden}

I did more than turn the knob.  When I moved the power switch and
thermostat, I moved them from the air conditioner to the wall with 8 feet of
MX cable in between.  Found out one other wire came loose and touched to
side of the unit.  Power is back on.  A transformer blew.  Don't think my
air conditioner did it but no one else in the office thinks its a
coincidence.

One whole house is pretty good -- nothing to sneeze at.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@182303 by Benjamin Bromilow

flavicon
face
I once did something really bad to a 555 chip. Not sure exactly what, but
the top blew off giving me a good look at the grizzly inards, including
where the wafer used to be.... The bang was almost as loud as the time I put
240v across a fluorscent starter just to see what would happen (I was 12 at
the time)....

Ben

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@182606 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> > > Does moving the power switch and thermostat on a window air
conditioner
> > > resulting in three city blocks going dead count?  Just did that this
> > > morning.
>
> > I don't know if that one counts...  Adjusting a knob is somewhat
different
> > from wiring something in wrong, giving it too much voltage/current
etc...
> > But top marks for effect, that's for sure!  I've never managed
> > any more than
> > 1 house, myself.
>
>
> I did more than turn the knob.  When I moved the power switch and
> thermostat, I moved them from the air conditioner to the wall with 8 feet
of
> MX cable in between.  Found out one other wire came loose and touched to
> side of the unit.  Power is back on.  A transformer blew.  Don't think my
> air conditioner did it but no one else in the office thinks its a
> coincidence.

Well, since you did more than turn the knob, I'd say it definitely counts ;)

> One whole house is pretty good -- nothing to sneeze at.
>

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@182828 by Dave Tweed

face
flavicon
face
Nelson Hochberg <@spam@nelsonRemoveMEspamEraseMENOSUFFERING.COM> wrote:
> Does moving the power switch and thermostat on a window air conditioner
> resulting in three city blocks going dead count?  Just did that this
> morning.
>
> Actually I think it was a coincidence since the breaker popped, but if it
> does count -- I DID IT.

Isn't that the weirdest feeling?

Many years ago, I worked as a computer operator in a huge computer room
with two complete IBM System/370s, each with about 12 huge disk drives and
8 tape drives, card reader/punch, printer and a motor/generator unit to
filter the power.

One day, I was in there by myself. I walked to the rear of one of the
printers to collect the accumulated printouts, hit the "pause" button so I
could tear the fanfold paper, and the entire room went dead. It was
amazing how quiet that room could be without all those fans running.

It turned out to be pure coincidence; an electrician working on the air
conditioners had done something he shouldn't have at that exact moment.
But I sure felt funny for a while until we figured out what had happened.

-- Dave Tweed

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@183235 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> I once did something really bad to a 555 chip. Not sure exactly what, but
> the top blew off giving me a good look at the grizzly inards, including
> where the wafer used to be.... The bang was almost as loud as the time I
put
> 240v across a fluorscent starter just to see what would happen (I was 12
at
> the time)....

I miswired a 79L12 once a few years ago.  It cracked off one leg, and a
corner of its TO-92 package and started to spew steam.  It actually melted
part of my breadboard.  The other fun one was the time I managed to create a
crater-like hole in the front of a package very similar to the TO-92.  To
this day, I have no idea what kind of component it was, and since I blew a
hole right through the part number marking, I will never know.

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\26@211122 by Nelson Hochberg

flavicon
face
{Quote hidden}

I'm sure there was an EE somewhere in New York City that flipped a switch
for the first time on his prototype the exact moment the entire city went
black.  I bet he considered starting his own church.

Nelson

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2002\08\27@004805 by Dwayne Reid

flavicon
face
At 06:09 PM 8/26/02 -0700, Nelson Hochberg wrote:

>I'm sure there was an EE somewhere in New York City that flipped a switch
>for the first time on his prototype the exact moment the entire city went
>black.  I bet he considered starting his own church.
>
>Nelson

Fifteen or so years ago, a local electrician did exactly that to
approximately 1/4 of the city of Edmonton (about 800K citizens
currently).  He was setting up for a LARGE rock show in the local coliseum
and had just finished tying in the feeds to the lighting rig.  Because of
the size of the lighting show, he was getting power without the benefit of
fuses in the tie lines to the substation.

He apparently had a large wrench sitting on the top of the cabinet.  When
he was finished, he turned to leave and casually swung the door of the
cabinet closed.  The wrench fell inside the cabinet . . .

The resulting hot air explosion tossed him across the room.  And the entire
north - east corner of Edmonton went dark.

We still kid him about it.

 . . .

A similar but more recent incident was related to me by a buddy.

He was part of the local 'dial before you dig' (underground utilities
locaters) group for Edmonton.  He got a call about a cable hit at a
construction site at a major freeway intersection and went to investigate.

It turns out that the fellow who had marked the locations of all the
utilities in the area had somehow managed to NOT mark the location of a
13.8 KV feeder.  The backhoe operator had seen something (a flash - I'm not
sure) and had stopped working and called in the hit.

The guy who had marked the site (and missed that line) got there first, my
buddy arrived just after.  He heard this dolt say something like "there's
nothing there!  Here: I'll show you".  This guy grabbed a 5 foot steel
crowbar and jumped into the hole.  Seconds later, there was a HUGE flash
and the entire south - central part of Edmonton went dark.

My buddy ran over to see if anything was left of the guy - who climbed out
the hole in the ground and muttered "I guess I better call somebody".  He
was fine, although I was told that he did get a serious black mark in his
record.

I've been careful to not mention names . . .

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <@spam@dwaynerspam_OUTspam.....planet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

Celebrating 18 years of Engineering Innovation (1984 - 2002)
 .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-
    `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'
Do NOT send unsolicited commercial email to this email address.
This message neither grants consent to receive unsolicited
commercial email nor is intended to solicit commercial email.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@015526 by Katinka Mills

flavicon
face
> -----Original Message-----
> From: pic microcontroller discussion list
> [spamBeGonePICLISTEraseMEspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Dwayne Reid
> Sent: Tuesday, 27 August 2002 12:07 PM
> To: PICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [EE]: The joys of electronics
<Sniped some great stories>

> dwayne

ROFLMAO, I have 2 stories to tell, about here in good ol WA (AU).

#1

A Large City skyscrpaer was being built, It was time to finish off the
Ground floor landscaping, so the site electrician was asked to run conduits
for the outside lighting. As there are many services in a CBD street, Dial
before you Dig was called, and the relevent service locations were
furnished, Including Detailed plans. So they set to work, a few hours work,
should be finished by 3PM (our construction site knock off time) Well things
got held up, it seemed that someone had some excess concreate, and just
buried it, so they had to break through this. As usuall the Aprentice gets
the fun jobs and was using the jack hammer. All went well for a few hours,
but around 5PM something strange happened, the aprentice was jackhammering,
and broke through the concrete, but as he was starting to get tired, did not
pull up as quick as before. There was a massive explosion, The poor guy was
thrown 6 foot back, the people (mainly formen and the required number of
union ppl) standing at the top of the trench were blown over. The Bang was
heard at the other end of the CBD, all the FreeWay interchange street
lighting went out, and so did all the buildings on that 11 Kv feed. When the
accident was investigated, the cable had been laid on the wrong side of the
street. The poor aprentice had is nylon undies melted by the flash. Luckily
no one was critically injured.

#2

A new quarrey was being setup in the hills of Perth. The time came for the
switchboard to be switched on. When they did a Massive explosion destroyed
the switch room and the entire board. It turns out that the aprentice was
given the task of checking the touqe on all the buss bar bolts. He needed an
extention to get to the ones on the main switch, but not the rest, so when
he had finished the main switch, he placed the extention bar on the top of
the main switch, it rolled back and rested on the buss bars. No one noticed
it untill after power up. A few people were hauled over the coals about not
doing proper tests.


Regards,

Kat.

**********************************************
K.A.Q. Electronics.
Electronic and Software Engineering.
Perth, Western Australia.
Ph +61 (0) 419 923 731
**********************************************
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.384 / Virus Database: 216 - Release Date: 21/08/2002

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@045335 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> > I once did something really bad to a 555 chip. Not sure exactly what,
but
> > the top blew off giving me a good look at the grizzly inards, including
> > where the wafer used to be.... The bang was almost as loud as the time I
> put
> > 240v across a fluorscent starter just to see what would happen (I was 12
> at
> > the time)....

I'll see your fluro starter and raise  you a line of metal can transistors
in the lab power sockets and then turn the mains on.

(Not the) "Loudest noise I ever heard" * but lots of fun.
Don't try that at home (or in the lab) if you want to live and/or finish
your degree :-)
(We managed both but YMMV).



       RM

* - Scott Crossfield, after the engine under static test in the X15 he was
sitting in underwent a spontaneous dismantlement.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@045404 by Roman Black

flavicon
face
Barry Gershenfeld wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Ha ha! Bingo! Only a day ago I blew the main filter
cap on a stepper driver board I was testing, slowly
increasing voltage to the driver and testing
performance, I got to 35v and BANG (+ PSU went direct
to the 6 amp current limit which is never a good sign)

Turns out the 470uF cap was a 16v one... Whoops.
Surprising how it worked fine at 32v, but those extra
3 volts weren't appreciated apparently. The rest of
the board was undamaged. Cap bulged badly and went
short, it was red hot but I hit it with the freezer
spray and prevented it spraying acid steam all over
the workshop. At least the other 7 boards I built
had the 50v caps. :o)

Now I know the safe voltage overhead for that brand
470uF 16v at least. ;o)
-Roman

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@064740 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
Ah,  this 13KV / 11KV stuff is kid's stuff...

I do some work for the Robert Moses Niagara Power Project at Niagara Falls.
The plant contains 13 large hydroelectric generators with capacities
approaching 200MW each. Each generator has an associated transformer
adjacent to it that steps up the 13KV from the generator to 115KV or 220KV
before sending the power to the switchyard. The transformers are in
partially enclosed concrete bays, with a large hole in the top of the
enclosure.

One day a company was contracted to recaulk all the joints in the concrete.
A laborer was working on top of one of the transformer bays and needed to
get from one corner to another. As we walked across he didn't realize it,
but his extension cord dropped down on top of the 115KV bus in the
transformer bay.

Bang... and a hugh plasma ball comes rolling out of the transformer bay.

Believe it or not the guy with the extension cord was ok (tho' he may have
needed a clean pair of short). Another tech was working down below and was
knocked on his backside.

The extension cord basically disappeared, as did the powerline that fed it.
It even evaporated a good length of the conduit feeding the outlet.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@073913 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
> I'll see your fluro starter and raise  you a line of metal can transistors
> in the lab power sockets and then turn the mains on.

When I was a kid I wanted to see what would happen if you plugged in one of
those little neon lights *without* that silly series resistor.

But, the best one was in college where I plugged in a telephone mouthpiece.
This produced a spectacular 1m orange flame shooting out straight, along
with a very satifying bang and evil looking smoke.


*****************************************************************
Embed Inc, embedded system specialists in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, http://www.embedinc.com

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@082712 by Nelson Hochberg

flavicon
face
> > I'll see your fluro starter and raise  you a line of metal can
> transistors
> > in the lab power sockets and then turn the mains on.
>
> When I was a kid I wanted to see what would happen if you plugged
> in one of
> those little neon lights *without* that silly series resistor.
>
> But, the best one was in college where I plugged in a telephone
> mouthpiece.
> This produced a spectacular 1m orange flame shooting out straight, along
> with a very satifying bang and evil looking smoke.

I remember as a kid, I had some 40ga wire, an automobile coil, an
oscillator, a battery and an available toilet seat.  No bang or smoke but
still very loud and messy.

My brother was, should we say, pissed off.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@103205 by llile

flavicon
face
We built a new air handler for a large office building.  The air handler
had a 200 HP fan motor, which delivered 80,000 CFM at high pressure (5"
static).  I got involved when we had to install a variable frequency drive
to run the 200 HP motor, and interlock it with the HVAC controls.

Now this was one of the bigger air handlers the contractor had built.
Picture this, an airtight box, maybe 50 feet long, with a fan at one end
sucking air out of the box, various filters and cooling coils inside, and
a big wall of dampers at the other end.  The dampers selected between
outside air and return air, and the controls picked whichever one used the
least energy to cool.

Now one or the other damper *must* be open at all times, and one of my
jobs was to build the interlock that made this happen.  My stuff worked
fine, but the contractor put tiny little motors on the dampers.  I was
*inside* the air handler when the inevitable occurred.  The 200 HP fan
kicked on, and both dampers remained closed.  The walls began buckling,
and the whole wall of dampers began to move toward me with a noise like a
bulldozer was coming through them. .  I had to hit the door (which opened
OUT) with my shoulder a few times to get out of there alive.  I ran is
slow motion like one of those dream sequences in the movies to slam the
panic switch on the motor controls and shut the whole system down.


-- Lawrence Lile

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@120503 by Nelson Hochberg

flavicon
face
The quick fix after all that:

Remove label which says Model # XXXXX Air Handler S/N XXXX.

Replace with label which says Model # XXXX Vacuum former and meat slicer
S/N XXXX


> {Original Message removed}

2002\08\27@122707 by Brendan Moran

flavicon
face
> > I'll see your fluro starter and raise  you a line of metal can
transistors
> > in the lab power sockets and then turn the mains on.

Well, my version of that (when I was much, much younger, back before I knew
Ohm's law) was a bent paperclip, and an old toaster switch.  I wanted to see
if it would glow...  Well, it did, for about a second, before the main CB
went. (That's right, it tripped the second level breaker.  The breaker for
that branch never blew.

But that's not my best story.  When I was taking a power electronics course
in college, we were in the machines lab, doing some kind of lab with big
resistor banks.  My friend had just finished his lab with his partner, and
they were starting to take down the wiring, when my friend gets shocked and
yelps "Ow!  It's still on!"  His lab partner somehow missinterprets that as
"these resistors sure are hot" and cotinues to disassemble his part of the
circuit, until he drops two of the wires together which, of course, arc for
a second, but not long enough to blow fuses or breakers.  He then says
something to the effect of "Hey, it's still on!"

--Brendan

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@125815 by Dave Tweed

face
flavicon
face
llile@SALTONUSA.COM wrote:
> Now one or the other damper *must* be open at all times, and one of my
> jobs was to build the interlock that made this happen.  My stuff worked
> fine, but the contractor put tiny little motors on the dampers.  I was
> *inside* the air handler when the inevitable occurred.  The 200 HP fan
> kicked on, and both dampers remained closed.  The walls began buckling,
> and the whole wall of dampers began to move toward me with a noise like a
> bulldozer was coming through them. .  I had to hit the door (which opened
> OUT) with my shoulder a few times to get out of there alive.  I ran is
> slow motion like one of those dream sequences in the movies to slam the
> panic switch on the motor controls and shut the whole system down.

That's an amazing story, but I have to ask:

1. Why wasn't the interlock *mechanical*, so that it would be impossible
  to close both dampers at once?

2. Why weren't there switches to detect the both-closed condition and
  disable the fan?

-- Dave Tweed

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@131651 by Barry Gershenfeld

face picon face
>I'm sure there was an EE somewhere in New York City that flipped a switch
>for the first time on his prototype the exact moment the entire city went
>black.  I bet he considered starting his own church.
>
>Nelson
>

You know, I almost posted this yesterday, but I was afraid that
too many people weren't around then, or don't live in this
country...but there was a story about a kid who hit the power
pole with his bat just as the lights went off...

...I was going to ask if maybe you were that kid...

Barry

Y'all google for Nov 9 1965 if you don't know about this one.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@134809 by Nelson Hochberg

flavicon
face
> >I'm sure there was an EE somewhere in New York City that flipped a switch
> >for the first time on his prototype the exact moment the entire city went
> >black.  I bet he considered starting his own church.
> >
> >Nelson
> >
>
> You know, I almost posted this yesterday, but I was afraid that
> too many people weren't around then, or don't live in this
> country...but there was a story about a kid who hit the power
> pole with his bat just as the lights went off...
>
> ...I was going to ask if maybe you were that kid...
>
> Barry
>
> Y'all google for Nov 9 1965 if you don't know about this one.


I wasn't in NYC and was past a kid at the time.  I think I will dig my bat
out of the garage and start testing the theory.

Nelson

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@141053 by llile

flavicon
face
Yep, that's exactly how the controls worked in phase II  !

-- Lawrence Lile





Dave Tweed <RemoveMEpic@spam@spamspamBeGoneDTWEED.COM>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <.....PICLIST@spam@spamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
08/27/02 11:56 AM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     .....PICLISTRemoveMEspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE]: The joys of electronics


.....llileSTOPspamspam@spam@SALTONUSA.COM wrote:
> Now one or the other damper *must* be open at all times, and one of my
> jobs was to build the interlock that made this happen.  My stuff worked
> fine, but the contractor put tiny little motors on the dampers.  I was
> *inside* the air handler when the inevitable occurred.  The 200 HP fan
> kicked on, and both dampers remained closed.  The walls began buckling,
> and the whole wall of dampers began to move toward me with a noise like
a
> bulldozer was coming through them. .  I had to hit the door (which
opened
> OUT) with my shoulder a few times to get out of there alive.  I ran is
> slow motion like one of those dream sequences in the movies to slam the
> panic switch on the motor controls and shut the whole system down.

That's an amazing story, but I have to ask:

1. Why wasn't the interlock *mechanical*, so that it would be impossible
  to close both dampers at once?

2. Why weren't there switches to detect the both-closed condition and
  disable the fan?

-- Dave Tweed

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@142900 by Walter Banks

picon face
> > >I'm sure there was an EE somewhere in New York City that flipped a switch
> > >for the first time on his prototype the exact moment the entire city went
> > >black.
> > Y'all google for Nov 9 1965 if you don't know about this one.
>

A commercial pilot friend of mine was flying to NY on the night the
lights went out. The lights below just blinked out like a big cloud
suddenly arrived. The ATC voice disappeared mid sentence. And he
looked down at the panel just in time to see the VOR go to "off".

How many pilots on the list would know know exactly where
you are if your nav aids disappear. Nov 1965 was before GPS.

w..

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@143253 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Tue, 27 Aug 2002, Olin Lathrop wrote:

>> I'll see your fluro starter and raise  you a line of metal can transistors
>> in the lab power sockets and then turn the mains on.
>
>When I was a kid I wanted to see what would happen if you plugged in one of
>those little neon lights *without* that silly series resistor.

Hehe. That I did too, by mistake. I dropped a sofite neon bulb and it fell
into a schuko receptacle on a power strip. Then I tried to pry it out
using the screwdriver I was using (the other hand was holding something).
The driver slipped into the phase hole and at the same time touched the
lamp which was resting against one of the ground springs. No GFI = big
bright flash and metallized glass flying everywhere. I was blind for a few
minutes after that.

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@151233 by mike

flavicon
face
Sounds familiar - when I was working at a repair shop fixing cheap
clock-radios and the like, the favorite was a 10uf 16v electrolytic
concealed in the mains plug of a soldering iron (here in the UK we
have fused plugs with quite a lot of space inside, and 240 volts to
play with....). This sort of escalated to the point that every time I
turned up there , I had to tur everything on at arms length, with a
stick in case of explosions....

For retalliation I resorted to somewhat more subtle tactics - we had
quick-connect 'safebloc' mains connectors on the bench, and I
dismantled the 3 amp ceramic mains fuse from one , and inserted  a
ground-down 1N4007 diode inside the ceramic tube, in place of the fuse
wire. I think it must have killed the internal fuses in about half a
dozen clock-radio mains transformers before they figured it out....
This tactic is also highly effective in bench lights, which run at
half brightness!



On Tue, 27 Aug 2002 21:14:02 +0300, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2002\08\27@212429 by Ashley Roll

flavicon
face
I'll see your paper clip and raise you a steel ruler :)

A little background.. For those that don't know, in Australia all the power
outlets are individually switched.. and normally the switch is above the
socket (sometimes a little offset to the side).

Back in High-School in a science lab the power points were for some reason
quite difficult to pull a plug out of. So one day in class a friend of mine
needed to unplug a piece of equipment..

Now this guy is a big lad.. about 6.5 foot tall even when he was in year 8..
He tries to pull the out the plug and can't get it out..

So, he reasons that he needs some leverage and picks up his ruler - made of
nice shiny steel.

He tuns off the switch (safety first you know) and proceeds to jam the ruler
into the top of the plug to lever it out of the socket. This is, of course,
a perfectly rational thing to do :)

As he is rocking the ruler back and forth to extract the plug it presses
against the switch and **BANG**.

One bright flash, one loud noise, one expletive from the teacher and the
circuit breakers kicks in and throws the lab into darkness :)

My friend is left standing there with a look of utter disbelief on his face
and a steel ruler with two melted notches in the end.. I think he still has
it to this day.. :)

Cheers,
Ash.

---
Ashley Roll
Digital Nemesis Pty Ltd
http://www.digitalnemesis.com
Mobile: +61 (0)417 705 718




> {Original Message removed}

2002\08\28@032651 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> A commercial pilot friend of mine was flying to NY on the night the
> lights went out. The lights below just blinked out like a big cloud
> suddenly arrived. The ATC voice disappeared mid sentence. And he
> looked down at the panel just in time to see the VOR go to "off".


I imagine the thought of nuclear war occurred to him for a moment or two.

While working for NZ Telecom I was talking to our head office 450 odd miles
away in Wellington city when connection via the internal phone system cut
out. Dialled back - dead. Tried outside lines to Wellington - dead. Tried
other Wellington numbers - dead. Turned out that we lost ALL comms to
Wellington in one  hit - a most unusual event. Can't even recall why now but
the redundancy planners would have had some explaining to do.

       RM

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservEraseMEspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\28@092755 by Chris Wheeler

flavicon
face
The stories you hear second hand when you work with ex Telstra people.....

#1 Painter was freshing up the walls in a telephone exchange. Placed his
paint can on the convienient metal busbars, and the paint flash boiled and
left a pretty pattern on the wall.

#2 Digging trenches for comms lines on campus, dug too deep, and pulled up
the ring main, big flash and sustained arc. By the time the power was shut
off the digger was welded solid.

#3 Contractors opened up the the access doors on one of those ground mounted
street transformers in darwin. whatever they touched started an arc, so they
steped back and rang for help. Neither was equipped with gloves or any other
safety equipment.

--
CW

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservspamspamBeGonemitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\28@123219 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
> Actually if the police or power company ask you, I had nothing to do with
> it.

Ha ha Did anyone pull a cash machine out of a wall while the power was off
?? :))

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spamBeGonelistservKILLspamspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\28@125751 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
> I'll see your fluro starter and raise  you a line of metal can transistors
> in the lab power sockets and then turn the mains on.

Hmm, the things we do when young and silly.

I was a lab boy in the physics lab during my last year of secondary school.
We had all sorts of equipment for doing the experiments described in the
PSSC Physics curriculum (anyone remember this course back in the mid 1960's
?). One of the items was a large bench power supply, capable of 3 outlets,
each going to 30V at 30A, AC or DC. The voltage control was a variac, and a
simple bridge rectifier was switched in for the DC mode. We had great fun
using this to try arc welding the vertical rods of test tube stands
together, and all sorts of other weird and wonderful experiments in our
lunch hours.

As for "professional" situation stories, I also have one. The company I
worked for decided to install the first of a new line of computers it
decided to try and sell, in the head office building, which was a
multi-storey one in downtown Wellington, New Zealand. This machine consisted
of a single rack unit for the CPU, with a CDC disc drive in a separate
cabinet. A low raised floor was fitted for the equipment to sit on, so that
all the cabling could be "underfloor". This meant that the rack unit had to
be lifted up, and there was minimal clearance to the suspended ceiling,
which got the inevitable knock or two. Next thing the fire alarm goes, and
the whole building empties of people, to await the arrival of the fire
service to declare the building safe, and everyone troops back in. Some more
fiddling with the machine and again a knock or two on the ceiling, another
fire alarm, and repeat evacuation. In due course it was discovered that the
fire sensor just above where the computer was being installed had the wires
to the alarm panel just twisted together, not even in a piece of "chocolate
block" screw connector, and the bumps the ceiling received were enough to
disturb the connection and set of the alarm.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspam_OUTspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\08\29@051004 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>> A commercial pilot friend of mine was flying to NY on the night the
>> lights went out. The lights below just blinked out like a big cloud
>> suddenly arrived. The ATC voice disappeared mid sentence. And he
>> looked down at the panel just in time to see the VOR go to "off".
>
>
>I imagine the thought of nuclear war occurred to him for a moment or two.
>
>While working for NZ Telecom I was talking to our head office 450 odd miles
>away in Wellington city when connection via the internal phone system cut
>out. Dialled back - dead. Tried outside lines to Wellington - dead. Tried
>other Wellington numbers - dead. Turned out that we lost ALL comms to
>Wellington in one  hit - a most unusual event. Can't even recall why now
but
>the redundancy planners would have had some explaining to do.



Shades of what happened to the company I worked for in Auckland. The company
set up am 0800 number for fault calls, and had operators in Auckland to
handle these. The company also moved to a computer database fault logging
system which allowed the operator to assign the call to an engineer, and
then when the call log was completed, would page the engineer with details
of the call which would show on an alpha pager.

The problem was that the morning the system went live, a contractor dug up
the main telecom cable in the Bombay Hills, south of Auckland, which carried
the pager calls to the pager handling centre in Hamilton. Result was a very
quiet day for fault calls. :)

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
spamBeGonepiclist-unsubscribe-request@spam@spammitvma.mit.edu


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2002 , 2003 only
- Today
- New search...