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'[EE]: SMT Toaster Oven'
2001\07\01@110304 by Roman Black

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Hi Guys, we have successfully done a few boards
now with SMT PIC chips in a cheap toaster oven,
they are coming out quite good.

Many thanks to Alexandre who sent me a temperature
vs time chart, and helpful "expert" tips.

Just letting you know you can get a pretty good
result with a $35 US (second hand) toaster oven
and a stopwatch, and good solder paste of course.

Each run it seems to be getting a bit better.
:o)
-Roman

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2001\07\01@111756 by dpharris

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Hi-
Are you aware of the Easy-Bake egroup at
http://au.egroups.com/group/E-Z_Bake ?  Kind of quite now, but plans were
to dedign a controller with temperature control to do this.  Do you have
any pictures of the results?
David

Roman Black wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\07\01@112832 by Roman Black

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Hi David, I didn't see the group but had checked
out a couple of amatuer SMT pages on the web.

You really don't need a special controller, I
just preheat the oven to about 150'C, put the
boards in, wait 2 minutes, then turn the oven up
full and watch the stopwatch. Works every time,
just takes a little practice getting the boards
placed well over the elements for even heating.

I can take a picture and post it up if you like.
:o)
-Roman


David Harris wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\07\01@113657 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza

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>Hi Guys, we have successfully done a few boards
>now with SMT PIC chips in a cheap toaster oven,
>they are coming out quite good.
>Just letting you know you can get a pretty good
>result with a $35 US (second hand) toaster oven
>and a stopwatch, and good solder paste of course.
>Each run it seems to be getting a bit better.

       It's really nice, so bad we CAN'T find the proper solder in paste here in Brazil... :~(


---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

Alexandre Souza
spam_OUTtaitoTakeThisOuTspamterra.com.br
http://planeta.terra.com.br/lazer/pinball/

---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

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2001\07\01@142204 by Fritz Braun Jr.

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How long do you cook it at full temp?


----- Original Message -----
From: "Roman Black" <.....fastvidKILLspamspam@spam@EZY.NET.AU>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2001 11:22
Subject: Re: [EE]: SMT Toaster Oven


{Quote hidden}

were
{Quote hidden}

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2001\07\01@164949 by Dan Michaels

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Roman wrote:

>You really don't need a special controller, I
>just preheat the oven to about 150'C, put the
>boards in, wait 2 minutes, then turn the oven up
>full and watch the stopwatch. Works every time,
>just takes a little practice getting the boards
>placed well over the elements for even heating.
>
>I can take a picture and post it up if you like.


Roman,

Are you kidding? You sure better post "everything" about
this, otherwise someone will try to patent it out from
under you.

A toaster oven usually works by direct radiation. What
temperature do you suppose the surface of the pcb gets up
to? And is this allowable, regards the specs for the chips?
And how does this compare to commercial smt cookers?

- dan
==============

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2001\07\01@172354 by steve

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> Are you kidding? You sure better post "everything" about
> this, otherwise someone will try to patent it out from
> under you.
>
> A toaster oven usually works by direct radiation. What
> temperature do you suppose the surface of the pcb gets up
> to? And is this allowable, regards the specs for the chips?
> And how does this compare to commercial smt cookers?

I use a toaster oven too. I used to use a hot air gun and the results
were pretty good but required a lot of operator skill and attention.
Very easy to stuff it up. Then I tried experimenting with a pop-up
toaster on its side, working on the theory that the smaller air
volume would be better for control. The theory was OK but
implementing it with a mass produced product wasn't all that
practical. Because of the volume thing, I wasn't too sure how the
toaster oven would go.

I bought a fan forced toaster oven and after a bit of experimentation,
found that putting the boards on the mica element formers from the
previous toaster experiments was perfect as it forms a bit of a
barrier between the top and bottom halves of the oven. I played
around a bit with shelf height to get good even heat coverage.

My procedure is also manual at this stage but it will be simple to
automate as soon as I get time.
I use a single thermocouple (as I know from experiments that it is
representative) and the temp meter I use has time on the display.
Put the boards in the oven.
Set temp to max, top & bottom elements and fan on.
When temp reads about 5 degrees below preheat, turn everything
off. (the 5 degrees compenstates for the system lag so the temp
will reach the setpoint and hold steady for around 30 sec).
Wait the preheat period.
Select grill and max temp. No fan.
When temp reaches 200 degrees, turn off.
The board temp will peak at 210-215 and drop off.
At about 190 (solder solid again), turn the fan on with no elements
(mixes in the slightly cooler air from below).
I open the door a little at 160 degrees and fully at about 100
degrees.

If I plot the temp and time it's almost exactly on the line provided
by the solder manufacturer. The whole cycle is about 5 minutes
from board in to board out and yield so far has been no failures in
about 75 board/panels.

Steve.

======================================================
Steve Baldwin                Electronic Product Design
TLA Microsystems Ltd         Microcontroller Specialists
PO Box 15-680, New Lynn      http://www.tla.co.nz
Auckland, New Zealand        ph  +64 9 820-2221
email: .....stevebKILLspamspam.....tla.co.nz      fax +64 9 820-1929
======================================================

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2001\07\01@193834 by Brandon Fosdick

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Has anyone thought of making something like what the pizza delivery
places use? Put the board on a conveyer on one side, it goes through the
oven at a set rate and comes out the other side nicely baked. Seems like
it would be great for production work.

Steve Baldwin wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\07\01@194345 by David VanHorn

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At 07:27 PM 7/1/01 -0400, Brandon Fosdick wrote:
>Has anyone thought of making something like what the pizza delivery
>places use? Put the board on a conveyer on one side, it goes through the
>oven at a set rate and comes out the other side nicely baked. Seems like
>it would be great for production work.

It wouldn't be any huge deal to set up, the hard part would be to fab the belt.
Steppers would control the rate through, and you could control the
temperature profile as well.

BTW: I started the easy-bake group :)

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2001\07\01@202409 by michael brown

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> At 07:27 PM 7/1/01 -0400, Brandon Fosdick wrote:
> >Has anyone thought of making something like what the pizza delivery
> >places use? Put the board on a conveyer on one side, it goes through the
> >oven at a set rate and comes out the other side nicely baked. Seems like
> >it would be great for production work.
>
> It wouldn't be any huge deal to set up, the hard part would be to fab the
belt.

Go to a Quizno's and check out their setup.  I think they use a flexible
wire rack.  They drop a sandwich on one side and it travels thru the oven
and comes out the other.

> Steppers would control the rate through, and you could control the
> temperature profile as well.
>
> BTW: I started the easy-bake group :)
>
> --
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2001\07\01@210653 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza

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>Has anyone thought of making something like what the pizza delivery
>places use? Put the board on a conveyer on one side, it goes through the
>oven at a set rate and comes out the other side nicely baked. Seems like
>it would be great for production work.

       I did it here for thermoplastic...


---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

Alexandre Souza
taitospamspam_OUTterra.com.br
http://planeta.terra.com.br/lazer/pinball/

---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

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2001\07\01@211238 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza
2001\07\02@040448 by Roman Black

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Hi Fritz, i'm still learning here and that is
one thing i'm playing with. It depends on the
distance the boards are placed above the elements,
and how many boards are in there. And obviously
the element power.

Currently I have the boards about 25mm above the
element, it goes like this:

* preheat oven to 150'C
* insert boards, preheat for 2 to 3 minutes
* turn oven up full (check stopwatch)
* takes about 35 seconds for solder paste to melt
* give it about 15 seconds after that
* open door and gently slide rack out

The results are reasonably good, but more importantly
they are predictable each time. On the 28pin PIC
there were maybe 2 legs dry and 2 legs bridged, I
found by increasing the solder paste amount I now
get no drys and maybe 2 or 3 bridged. All of the
joints are excellent (I use 30x microscope) and
removing a couple of bridges per board takes a
few seconds manually with an iron and wick.

It's good enough for small production now, and
as I refine it it's getting better. I use a 19 gauge
needle on the paste syringe, ground flat and only
10mm of needle length. I just need to practice
laying down the correct amount of paste, each run
it gets easier.

I welcome any suggestions, and as usual I will
probably end up putting my procedure and pictures
on my web page. :o)
-Roman


Fritz Braun Jr. wrote:
>
> How long do you cook it at full temp?
>
> {Original Message removed}

2001\07\02@051040 by Roman Black

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David VanHorn wrote:
>
> At 07:27 PM 7/1/01 -0400, Brandon Fosdick wrote:
> >Has anyone thought of making something like what the pizza delivery
> >places use? Put the board on a conveyer on one side, it goes through the
> >oven at a set rate and comes out the other side nicely baked. Seems like
> >it would be great for production work.
>
> It wouldn't be any huge deal to set up, the hard part would be to fab the belt.
> Steppers would control the rate through, and you could control the
> temperature profile as well.


I fixed a wire belt conveyor oven, it was used by
a printer for drying special inks on business cards.

They usually shake a lot, not good for melted solder.

What about a slowly rotating platter, ie a rotary
motion instead of a linear motion?? Or even rotate
the heating elements over a flat metal table??
That has a lot of possibilities. With a cheap toaster
oven we can do 4 boards in about 5 minutes, which is
fine, but a continuous production would be excellent.
-Roman

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2001\07\02@052326 by Roman Black

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Thanks Steve for the good info. The procedures are
very similar, and hopefully Alexandre from Africa will
post some of his info too?

I don't use a thermocouple, but I first put a ceramic
block in the oven at different locations and times and
measured it's temp with my non-contact thermometer.

Surface mount production is much more gentle than rework,
the boards are treated very well. With my setup the
oven just brings the solder to melt and is turned off
a few seconds later. Since I know the max rate the oven
can heat, this ensures the total board heating never
gets over the safe amount. According to my non-contact
thermometer, the max temp of the chips and board is LESS
than normal soldering with my temp controlled weller
iron.

The solder joints are very bright and nicely wetted,
microscope inspection shows they are very high qualty
soldered. I use the 2% silver solder paste that Alexandre
suggested.
-Roman



Steve Baldwin wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\07\02@064658 by Alexandre Domingos F. Souza

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>Thanks Steve for the good info. The procedures are
>very similar, and hopefully Alexandre from Africa will
>post some of his info too?

       Eh...maybe Brazil? :o)


---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

Alexandre Souza
@spam@taitoKILLspamspamterra.com.br
http://planeta.terra.com.br/lazer/pinball/

---8<---Corte aqui---8<----

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2001\07\02@094758 by David VanHorn

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>
>What about a slowly rotating platter, ie a rotary
>motion instead of a linear motion?? Or even rotate
>the heating elements over a flat metal table??
>That has a lot of possibilities. With a cheap toaster
>oven we can do 4 boards in about 5 minutes, which is
>fine, but a continuous production would be excellent.
>-Roman

You know.. There is a home-type pizza baker that works this way.
Hmm :)
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2001\07\02@150738 by Olin Lathrop

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> I would have a link to http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/find.cgi?KC6ETE-9 here
> in my signature line, but due to the inability of sysadmins at TELOCITY to
> differentiate a signature line from the text of an email, I am forbidden
to
> have it.

Um, but you DO have a link there, and it works too.  I tried it.


********************************************************************
Olin Lathrop, embedded systems consultant in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, KILLspamolinKILLspamspamembedinc.com, http://www.embedinc.com

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2001\07\02@152403 by Barry Gershenfeld

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>Has anyone thought of making something like what the pizza delivery
>places use? Put the board on a conveyer on one side, it goes through the
>oven at a set rate and comes out the other side nicely baked. Seems like
>it would be great for production work.

Wait a minute...these are real.  They are called convection reflow
ovens and the only difference is they are longer.  You can
have "zones" and a temperature profile (curve) as the board
goes through.  It's the kind of thing you need if you ever
get into BGA chips.

Now I know the idea works in reverse--I always suggested running pizzas
through the thing...then I read somewhere that someone was doing
that and they found that the residues had an effect on the solder
joints when they went back to using it to do boards...oh, well.

Barry

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2001\07\02@183347 by Dale Botkin

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On Mon, 2 Jul 2001, Barry Gershenfeld wrote:

> Now I know the idea works in reverse--I always suggested running pizzas
> through the thing...then I read somewhere that someone was doing
> that and they found that the residues had an effect on the solder
> joints when they went back to using it to do boards...oh, well.

Ick... I hope paste solder is lead-free??

Dale
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2001\07\02@190544 by Dal Wheeler

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----- Original Message -----
From: Barry Gershenfeld <RemoveMEbarryTakeThisOuTspamZMICRO.COM>

> Now I know the idea works in reverse--I always suggested running pizzas
> through the thing...then I read somewhere that someone was doing
> that and they found that the residues had an effect on the solder
> joints when they went back to using it to do boards...oh, well.

Hmmm...  Pepperoni grease doesn't make a good fluxing agent?  Maybe an
enterprising sort could come up with a pepperoni that has a more compatible
"organic flux", so the dream of a pizza shop by day/electronics production
house at night could be a reality.
:)

Along a similar thought, there's a new business that opened across town
that's a Laundromat + pub, called Suds and Duds.  I could imagine some of
the opening lines that go on in that bar.

Stray animal pound + lunch meat company?
-Dal

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2001\07\02@231301 by James Newton. Admin 3

face picon face
My dad was an engineer at Hughes Aircraft in the semiconductor division (did
you know they had one?) and had to troubleshoot a number of problems. The
worst one was when the metallic vapors that were deposited on the wafers
stopped sticking to the surface. After much investigating, dad found out
that the night crew was using the ovens to heat up their chicken, burritos,
etc... and the microscopic volume of grease was plating onto the inside and
then coating the wafers along with the metals during production.

No metal vapor in the kitchen, no food in the clean room.

James Newton, PICList Admin #3
spamBeGonejamesnewtonspamBeGonespampiclist.com
1-619-652-0593 phone
http://www.piclist.com

{Original Message removed}

2001\07\03@040906 by Roman Black

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James Newton. Admin 3 wrote:
>
> My dad was an engineer at Hughes Aircraft in the semiconductor division (did
> you know they had one?) and had to troubleshoot a number of problems. The
> worst one was when the metallic vapors that were deposited on the wafers
> stopped sticking to the surface. After much investigating, dad found out
> that the night crew was using the ovens to heat up their chicken, burritos,
> etc... and the microscopic volume of grease was plating onto the inside and
> then coating the wafers along with the metals during production.
>
> No metal vapor in the kitchen, no food in the clean room.


Ha ha! Now I know why PICs fail sometimes!
Traces of Burrito in the die...
;o)
-Roman

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2001\07\03@123218 by Harold M Hallikainen

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On Mon, 2 Jul 2001 17:59:03 +1000 Roman Black <TakeThisOuTfastvidEraseMEspamspam_OUTEZY.NET.AU>
writes:
> It's good enough for small production now, and
> as I refine it it's getting better. I use a 19 gauge
> needle on the paste syringe, ground flat and only
> 10mm of needle length. I just need to practice
> laying down the correct amount of paste, each run
> it gets easier.

       Anyone having their board house silkscreen on the solder paste? I know
there's an issue with the amount of time after paste placement before
component placement. Can boards be refrigerated or something to extend
this time?

Harold



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2001\07\05@163540 by Lawrence Lile

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You paid too much.  My toaster ovens cost $35 new.  Buy one online at
http://www.toastmaster.com

[Shameless plug, toungue in cheek]


-- Lawrence Lile
Toastmaster, inc.

{Original Message removed}

2001\07\05@164430 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 03:33 PM 7/5/01 -0500, you wrote:
>You paid too much.  My toaster ovens cost $35 new.  Buy one online at
>http://www.toastmaster.com
>
>[Shameless plug, toungue in cheek]

I've seen some with (some kind of) electronic controls for around
US$70, IIRC. LCD display.

Best regards,
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
RemoveMEspeffspamTakeThisOuTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com
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2001\07\05@170231 by Lawrence Lile

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They also fail to mention you can hack a standard Handi-Pan and use it to
make a nice bulk soldering pot.  I did this for a dip-soldering "wave
solder" machine before I discovered SMT toaster ovens.  You hold the board
with a pair of vice grips, and dunk the solder side into the molten solder,
holding it for 15 seconds and jiggling it a little.

<Begin Legal Notice>
Do not try using a toaster oven for SMT soldering nor use a handi-pan for
melting bulk solder.  Doing so voids your warrantee.  Toastmaster does not
condone nor endorse such abuse of our products nor are we going to be
responsible when you dump molten solder in your lap.  </Notice>




{Original Message removed}

2001\07\05@171041 by David VanHorn

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At 04:00 PM 7/5/01 -0500, Lawrence Lile wrote:
>They also fail to mention you can hack a standard Handi-Pan and use it to
>make a nice bulk soldering pot.  I did this for a dip-soldering "wave
>solder" machine before I discovered SMT toaster ovens.  You hold the board
>with a pair of vice grips, and dunk the solder side into the molten solder,
>holding it for 15 seconds and jiggling it a little.
>
><Begin Legal Notice>
>Do not try using a toaster oven for SMT soldering nor use a handi-pan for
>melting bulk solder.  Doing so voids your warrantee.  Toastmaster does not
>condone nor endorse such abuse of our products nor are we going to be
>responsible when you dump molten solder in your lap.  </Notice>

I'd like to try that rotary pizza thing, but at $88 locally, it's a bit pricey.

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2001\07\06@043221 by Roman Black

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Lawrence Lile wrote:
>
> You paid too much.  My toaster ovens cost $35 new.  Buy one online at
> http://www.toastmaster.com
>
> [Shameless plug, toungue in cheek]


Umm, but mine is full stainless steel body, inside
and out, 4 elements, 2500 watts. New they cost about
$85 US. I thought $35 for a used one in top condition
was quite ok.
:o)
-Roman

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2001\07\06@054159 by Roman Black

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Hi Lawrence, I just went and looked at your toaster
oven products at:
http://www.toastmaster.com

Cool! Your other post to the list about the use of your
toaster ovens voiding the warranty worries me.

Surely using toaster ovens for SMT work is quite gentle
and controlled, compared to most other kitchen type
use?? And maybe if you could build a data set of temps
and heating times you could sell a lot of toaster ovens
for SMT use?? I'm just guessing that there is a waiting
market of people ready to do home SMT if they could get
an oven and data on how to use it.

We have just started doing SMT, and it really is not
that hard. People are scared of investing in hardware
and trying something new and unproven. Maybe the first
toaster oven maker that has the guts to approach this
market will sell thousands of toaster ovens??
-Roman




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2001\07\06@113104 by Lawrence Lile

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Ya, maybe.  1000 customers just gets a yawn from our marketing department
They pay no attention to products with less than a million pieces potential
sales.   That's why we make George Foreman Grills instead of soldering
equipment.

Now, a small company or consultant could possibly modify equipment and
resell it, with the proper legal agreements ahead of time .......


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2001\07\06@115228 by goflo

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Had'nt occurred to me, but 1500W toaster ovens are what
you see here - 120V vs 240V mains? Something to keep in
mind per the reflow times quoted, perhsps.

Jack

Roman Black wrote:
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2001\07\06@121038 by David VanHorn

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At 10:30 AM 7/6/01 -0500, Lawrence Lile wrote:
>Ya, maybe.  1000 customers just gets a yawn from our marketing department
>They pay no attention to products with less than a million pieces potential
>sales.   That's why we make George Foreman Grills instead of soldering
>equipment.

I just bought one of those. For food though.

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2001\07\07@005032 by Roman Black

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John Gardner wrote:
>
> Had'nt occurred to me, but 1500W toaster ovens are what
> you see here - 120V vs 240V mains? Something to keep in
> mind per the reflow times quoted, perhsps.


Thanks John, mine is actually a 1500W 4 element
oven. My memory failed me, I remembered rejecting
a smaller oven that was only 1250W, and for some
reason I thought the stainless one was 2500W.
Sorry about that!
-Roman

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2001\07\15@233002 by 859-1?Q?Alexandre_Guimar=E3es?=

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Hi, Everyone

> Hi Guys, we have successfully done a few boards
> now with SMT PIC chips in a cheap toaster oven,
> they are coming out quite good.
>
> Many thanks to Alexandre who sent me a temperature
> vs time chart, and helpful "expert" tips.


   You are welcome Roman. I have been out for a while so I will post some
details so that everyone can see that the crazy idea of soldering SMT on
toaster ovens works quite nicely...

   I am doing about 500 boards a month with 200 '0805' components and one
SOIC avr Cpu and have not problems at all. The oven is a small 800w toaster
oven with infrared "burners". The temperature profile is controlled by a
comercial temperature controller that can do 'ramps'. The full cycle for a
board is 6 minutes because I prefer to start the temperature slowly and keep
it for a while bellow the flux activation phase just to make sure the board
temperature equalizes all over. We have produced more than 4000 boards and
had no problems at all with the soldering procedure. I even have SMD
components on BOTH SIDES of the board and solder them all at the same time.
The tension of the solder paste keeps the components from falling down.

   I would never try to build a moving conveyor !! It would make things
much harder to control. I got the temperature profile from my setup and it
beats a 3 zone oven by much. It is almost as good as a 7 zone oven. You get
many more problems when you move the boards. If you have big production
needs just go and buy a big oven or have the boards made by someone else.

   I got some of my board analysed with xray and all is really fine...

   If you want to try the toaster oven go ahead, it works nicely.... Be
carefull with the temperature profile, use 2% silver solder paste and use
only evens that have mostly infrared heating. I could not get repeatable
results without a nice temperature controller.

   If anyone have any questions I would be happy to help in all I can..

PS: I am not in Africa, Roman... I am down in Brazil. It seems that we have
2 brazilian Alexandres on the Piclist.

Best regards,
Alexandre Guimaraes
RemoveMEalexgEraseMEspamEraseMEiis.com.br

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2001\07\15@233011 by 859-1?Q?Alexandre_Guimar=E3es?=

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Hy, Alexandre

   Yes we have solder paste down here in Brazil !! We even have a Kester
factory down here ! Anyone that needs it can send me a private mail and I
will grab the phone number. I use Kester R276 with 2% silver. Works
beautifully...

Best regards,
Alexandre Guimaraes
RemoveMEalexgTakeThisOuTspamspamiis.com.br




> >Hi Guys, we have successfully done a few boards
> >now with SMT PIC chips in a cheap toaster oven,
> >they are coming out quite good.
> >Just letting you know you can get a pretty good
> >result with a $35 US (second hand) toaster oven
> >and a stopwatch, and good solder paste of course.
> >Each run it seems to be getting a bit better.
>
>         It's really nice, so bad we CAN'T find the proper solder in paste
here in Brazil... :~(

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2001\07\18@011935 by Roman Black

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Tony Nixon wrote:

> I am finishing up a project I started awhile back that uses SM parts on
> a small fiddly PCB. I'd be interested knowing how the oven and paste
> work out. I might have to set up something like that myself. I takes me
> about an hour to solder the parts on this small PCB and the result is
> not very professional looking and is bound to lead to problems.
>
> Is the Farnell Part number - 149-968
> What oven brand do you use?
> Does this method work on double sided SM components?


Hi Tony, some good posts so far on this hey! I'm
a real beginner with this and learning as much
as anyone from the expert SMT guys posts. :o)

The oven we use is a Ronson combi-oven, it has
2 bar elements on the bottom and two on the top.
It was cheap and 1500w, and works great. We do
4 boards in 5 minutes with good repeatability.
I could put 8 boards in, but can't be bothered,
we only need to make small batches of 12 or 16
boards anyway.

Heating is very localised above the elements,
but our boards have all the chips within a 2"
square so this works fine. I don't think we
could solder a large board, not in one go anyway.

It's working great for this particular project,
a 28 pin SMT PIC and a few 8-pin SMT chips all
close to each other. We then hand solder the
PTH components (my preferred method). It heats
the small boards completely, so would work on
all SMT components top or bottom, but it sounds
scary putting parts on the bottom! Alex G said
he was going to put up some pictures of his
equipment soon.
-Roman

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2001\07\18@020351 by Ashley Roll

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Hi everyone,

Just to put in my two cents, I've started experimenting with this as well
and I have the paste from Prime Electronics. "Multicore RM10" that someone
mentioned earlier..

I've been talking with Alexandre G about this stuff and we have just started
designing a temperature controller to adapt a toaster oven to a completely
controllable SMT oven :)

It will have the ability to define temperature profiles on a PC and download
them into the controller then select them and run them standalone. Probably
have the ability to log temperature to the PC as well just 'cause we can :)
LCD and a few buttons for the interface. Temperature sensing using a
thermocouple probably..

The intention is to release it for all to use. I'll keep everyone informed
as we progress over the next several weeks.

The questions is: do we make the SMT oven controller all surface mount
components :) Chicken and Egg, which came first :P

Cheers,
Ash.

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2001\07\18@110438 by 859-1?Q?Alexandre_Guimar=E3es?=

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Hi, Everyone

> I've been talking with Alexandre G about this stuff and we have just
started
> designing a temperature controller to adapt a toaster oven to a completely
> controllable SMT oven :)
> The questions is: do we make the SMT oven controller all surface mount
> components :) Chicken and Egg, which came first :P

   My vote is to make it all SMT ! Let's let everybody have some fun with
small parts and tweezers and let's start to train them to make the necessary
rework task they will have once they have the oven working. :-)

   About the solder paste I prefer to use it with 2% silver because on may
capacitors the contact points have silver on them and it migrates to the
solder if you use plain tin/lead paste. At least that is what AVX and some
other capacitor manufacturers recommend. Try Kester, they are very reponsive
to costumers, at least here in Brazil. They send me samples and sold me
small quantities without any trouble at all.

   Remember always to store the paste in the refrigerator and take it out
at least one hour before using it. If you don't store it at the fridge it
will be bad really soon and if you do not let it warm to room temperature it
does not stick to the pads or to the components.

Best regards,
Alexandre Guimaraes
RemoveMEalexgKILLspamspamiis.com.br

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