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'[EE]: SMD Soldering, was Printer to PCB?'
2002\11\18@062258 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I must say that I disagree with you about the solder and a very fine tip.

Yes I am aware of people that use a large tip, and wipe it down the pins of
an IC, and that solder paste is useful, but there are times when you need to
lift a leg on a chip because of a necessary circuit change, and the pin has
a track that goes under the chip ....

Large tips, paste etc work OK when starting with a fresh board, and loading
the components. The problem arises when you get to rework :)

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2002\11\18@063542 by Tal Bejerano - AMC

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well... I thought we do some regular soldering work here..not a NASA
experiments :-)
I'm sure there is a simple solution for all the gentle/fine rework' we just
need to be curious enough to find answers. in the piclist sometimes I see
some brilliant solutions that I never thought of it.
curiosity and "digging" is the name of the game! :-))


Regards

Tal Bejerano
AMC - ISRAEL


{Original Message removed}

2002\11\18@073358 by Roman Black

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Tal Bejerano - AMC wrote:
>
> well... I thought we do some regular soldering work here..not a NASA
> experiments :-)
> I'm sure there is a simple solution ...


There IS a very easy (and cheap!) way to do this,
which we discovered thanks to Alexandre G and the
temp curve info he so kindly supplied.

We use a typical cheap toaster oven with no fans,
and position the boards about 1" over the
elements, on the standard slide-out rack that
comes with the oven. This solders about a 2" max
"depth" area of the board as it has to be over
the bar element. For larger areas you need a fan
oven which costs a bit more.

The next step is to calibrate the oven dial
to 150'C, I did this by heating a large ceramic
block (a 30W resistor) over the element and
measuring it's temp, found that to get a good
constant 150'C above the element required the
oven dial to be on 160, which was marked with
a pen. This is our pre-heat temp.

If you don't have an IR thermometer ($40 ?) you
can get a 200'C glass lab thermometer ordered from
your pharmacist, probably about $12.

Soldering was incredibly easy. We put the boards
in, set oven to the pre-heat 150'C mark, and
wait 2 minutes with a timer or stopwatch.

Then, crank the oven up full, (elements full on)
and simply watch the solder paste with a bright
light through the oven door. This takes about
15 or so seconds for all the paste to melt and
go fully "wetted".

At this point just open the oven door, turn it
off, and the rack the PCBs are on is *gently*
slid out a few inches to cool.

It gives 100% perfect SMD soldering with the
absolute minimum heat needed and possibly the
quickest cool down and turn-around time.
Boards can be lifted out with pliers and the
cycle repeated within about 20 seconds of the
door opening.

A fan forced oven may be better for larger boards
but might take longer getting from 150'C up to
the wetted heat which might stress components.
For tiny boards a cheap bar-element oven works
very well with no expensive timers, but you do
have to watch it!
:o)
-Roman

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2002\11\18@114533 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Roman Black wrote:
> Tal Bejerano - AMC wrote:
>>
>> well... I thought we do some regular soldering work here..not a NASA
>> experiments :-)
>> I'm sure there is a simple solution ...
>
>
> There IS a very easy (and cheap!) way to do this,
> which we discovered thanks to Alexandre G and the
> temp curve info he so kindly supplied.
>
> We use a typical cheap toaster oven with no fans,
> and position the boards about 1" over the
> elements, on the standard slide-out rack that
> comes with the oven. This solders about a 2" max
> "depth" area of the board as it has to be over
> the bar element. For larger areas you need a fan
> oven which costs a bit more.

[snip]

Roman, how do you deposit the solder paste over the board's SMD pads?

Wagner.

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2002\11\18@145825 by Roman Black

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Wagner Lipnharski wrote:

> Roman, how do you deposit the solder paste over the board's SMD pads?


Just spot or "line" with the solder paste syringe,
I got a 19 gauge needle from the pharmacist (the
real BIG one you don't want to ever see in your
doctor's hand) cut it to 10mm length and filed
the cut end very smooth and flat. Alexandre G said
to always use the good paste with 2% silver and
I followed his advice. :o)
-Roman

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2002\11\18@170019 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Roman Black wrote:
> Wagner Lipnharski wrote:
>
>> Roman, how do you deposit the solder paste over the board's SMD pads?
>
>
> Just spot or "line" with the solder paste syringe,
> I got a 19 gauge needle from the pharmacist (the
> real BIG one you don't want to ever see in your
> doctor's hand) cut it to 10mm length and filed
> the cut end very smooth and flat. Alexandre G said
> to always use the good paste with 2% silver and
> I followed his advice. :o)
> -Roman


I just used the very narrow plastic noozle it comes with, around 1mm line
can be poured.
The idea of using a X/Y home made plotter with a paste spitter would be
great.

Wagner.

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2002\11\18@175948 by Steve Ruse

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Regarding the toaster oven technique, I have seen SMDs soldered by placing a
single bead of solder paste on all of the legs, down the entire length of
the chip. Just one bead of solder per row of legs (not sure if I'm making
sense here). Then heat the chip with a heat gun (or toaster) & the solder
will separate between each leg (due to surface tension?) & solder each leg
to the board. Saves time because you only have to put down one bead of
solder. It looks very slick, as it is such a crude method but it works so
well. If you were good at it you could probably solder a 32 pin PLCC to a
board in less than a minute.

Steve

{Original Message removed}

2002\11\18@183506 by Nick Veys

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Happen to know if a Hair Dryer would produce enough heat for this?  I
know heat guns are inredibly hot so I'm wondering if it's really
necessary for moving the solder paste.

Nick Veys / spam_OUTnickTakeThisOuTspamveys.com / http://www.veys.com

] Regarding the toaster oven technique, I have seen SMDs
] soldered by placing a single bead of solder paste on all of
] the legs, down the entire length of the chip. Just one bead
] of solder per row of legs (not sure if I'm making sense
] here). Then heat the chip with a heat gun (or toaster) & the
] solder will separate between each leg (due to surface
] tension?) & solder each leg to the board. Saves time because
] you only have to put down one bead of solder. It looks very
] slick, as it is such a crude method but it works so well. If
] you were good at it you could probably solder a 32 pin PLCC
] to a board in less than a minute.
]
] Steve

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2002\11\18@184345 by Olin Lathrop

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> Happen to know if a Hair Dryer would produce enough heat for this?

Think about it.  Can your hair withstand the temperature of molten solder?


*****************************************************************
Embed Inc, embedded system specialists in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, http://www.embedinc.com

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2002\11\18@184355 by Josh Koffman

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I have no idea if it will, but you might be able to get the heat up by
using some sort of mechanical concentrator. Basically a metal funnel of
sorts.

Josh
--
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completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
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Nick Veys wrote:
> Happen to know if a Hair Dryer would produce enough heat for this?  I
> know heat guns are inredibly hot so I'm wondering if it's really
> necessary for moving the solder paste.

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2002\11\18@190244 by Dal Wheeler

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Sure, it'd just get more and more curly.  :')  Paint stripper guns are cheap
and available enough and they have metal barrels and concentrators.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Olin Lathrop" <.....olin_piclistKILLspamspam@spam@EMBEDINC.COM>

> > Happen to know if a Hair Dryer would produce enough heat for this?
>
> Think about it.  Can your hair withstand the temperature of molten solder?

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2002\11\18@190903 by Jonathan Johnson

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I reckon my mother outlaw's hair would ;-)...or maybe her breath would take
care of the necessary heat requirements <G>

> {Original Message removed}

2002\11\20@180846 by Philip Pemberton

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Steve Ruse wrote:
> Regarding the toaster oven technique, I have seen SMDs soldered by
> placing a single bead of solder paste on all of the legs, down the
> entire length of the chip. Just one bead of solder per row of legs
> (not sure if I'm making sense here). Then heat the chip with a heat
> gun (or toaster) & the solder will separate between each leg (due to
Now I know how I'm soldering all my SMDs in future :-)
Snaffle them off the board using the B&D heatgun, resolder them onto new
boards with the same heatgun and some fresh solder paste :-)
Has anyone here tried any of the solder pastes Multicore (UK) makes? See
http://www.multicore.com . Farnell stock nearly everything Multicore makes, btw.
But they don't stock any of the Kester solders...

Later.
--
Phil.
philpemspamKILLspamdsl.pipex.com
http://www.philpem.dsl.pipex.com/

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