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'[EE]: Power supply'
2000\12\29@200752 by Jose S. Samonte Jr.

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Could you use a 12V-1000mA supply for a 12V-500mA equipment?

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2000\12\29@204941 by Byron A Jeff

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>
> Could you use a 12V-1000mA supply for a 12V-500mA equipment?

Yes. The equipment will only draw the power it requires.

It's the reverse (500ma supply, 1000ma equipment) that generally causes
trouble.

BAJ

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2000\12\29@210455 by Jinx

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> > Could you use a 12V-1000mA supply for a 12V-500mA equipment?
>
> Yes. The equipment will only draw the power it requires.
>
> BAJ

One thing you may have to watch out for is how they arrived at the
rating. You may be using a wall wart (ie a "battery eliminator" or
transformer that plugs into the wall and has a DC line coming from
it) and this might not be a regulated 12 volts

It's possible that the label "12V 1000mA" means the voltage will
be 12V ONLY IF THE EQUIPMENT IS DRAWING 1000mA !!!! The
unloaded or low-loaded voltage could be many volts over this. For
example my small 5" TV has a wall wart labelled as "12V 800mA"
but the unloaded voltage is 17.5 volts. Even when powering the TV
it drops to only 13.4 volts. Wall wart manufacturers are notorious
for sloppy labelling. Be careful.

Please measure the unloaded voltage of your transformer before you
attach it to anything that could be damaged by excess voltage. Also
check to see if the supply gets too hot. Some labels are over-optimistic
to say the least

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2000\12\29@210811 by Mike

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Jose S. Samonte Jr. wrote:
> Could you use a 12V-1000mA supply for a 12V-500mA equipment?

In general, yes you can.  The current rating on power supplies tends to
refer to the *maximum* current that the supply is capable of providing,
while the current rating on a piece of equipment will generally refer to how
much current the item requires to operate.  There's more to it than what
I've said (peak draw, surge, things like that), but for the basics yes, an
item that requires 500mA can be fed from a 1000mA supply.
-- Mike Werner  KA8YSD   | He that is slow to believe anything and
                     | everything is of great understanding,
'91 GS500E            | for belief in one false principle is the
Morgantown WV         | beginning of all unwisdom.



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2000\12\29@215259 by Herbert Graf

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> Could you use a 12V-1000mA supply for a 12V-500mA equipment?

    It depends on the equipment. Usually there is no problem in using a
1000mA supply for 500mA equipment. TTYL

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