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'[EE]: Plated thru holes'
2002\12\15@213929 by PicDude

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Building a circuit that depends on the component-mounting
pads to pass signals from bottom to top, like vias would.
However, the holes are not plated thru.  My worry is that
some of the components are flush-mounted to the board (like
large caps) and some holes are tight enough that solder may
not get thru to connect the sides.

Is there something I can do to help fix this *before* I
start mounting the components?  I'm going to pre-tin the
holes on the component side, and the components close to
the body, but not sure that will be a full solution.

Cheers,
-Neil.

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2002\12\15@214346 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 08:37 PM 12/15/02 -0600, you wrote:
>Building a circuit that depends on the component-mounting
>pads to pass signals from bottom to top, like vias would.
>However, the holes are not plated thru.  My worry is that
>some of the components are flush-mounted to the board (like
>large caps) and some holes are tight enough that solder may
>not get thru to connect the sides.
>
>Is there something I can do to help fix this *before* I
>start mounting the components?  I'm going to pre-tin the
>holes on the component side, and the components close to
>the body, but not sure that will be a full solution.

Small eyelets, but the holes (and by extension, probably the pads)
have to be made oversize.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
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2002\12\15@215420 by Rick C.

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When I have to prototype a double sided board and have pads on the top
that I need to connect to, I just solder where I can on the top. Large
components, I just don't push them all the way in and use a solder
pencil to reach under the component to the pad. Of course mechanical
g-forces may work on the component but adequate for prototyping. Another
trick I use, as long as there aren't too many, is that I take a very
thin 30 ga wirewrap type wire and push it thru a hole, lay the wire
tight against the pad and touch a small amount of solder to the pads on
both sides to the board as long as the hole is big enough to insert the
component. An example would be an IC socket.
Rick

PicDude wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2002\12\15@231356 by A.J. Tufgar

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I remember reading a web page awhile back that some bought small metal
tubes (don't think they were actually vias) and loaded them into a 0.5
mm pencil, they pushed the pencil up against the board clicked it and
the via would pop into the board, a little solder on each side and
presto your done.  You could do something like this, but I have
absolutly no idea what page I saw it on.  :)

Hopefully this helps some, sorry I don't know where I found it,

Aaron

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2002\12\15@232013 by PicDude

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Spehro Pefhany wrote:
>
> Small eyelets, but the holes (and by extension, probably the pads)
> have to be made oversize.


Rick C. wrote:
>
> ...  I just don't push them all the way in and use a solder
> pencil to reach under the component to the pad. Of course mechanical
> g-forces may work on the component but adequate for prototyping. Another
> trick I use, as long as there aren't too many, is that I take a very
> thin 30 ga wirewrap type wire and push it thru a hole, lay the wire
> ...


Ray Gallant wrote:
> ...
> I typically insert two 30  or 36 AWG or smaller bare wire in the
> hole.  Since there are two wires, the solder should flow through.



Things are tight in this circuit and one result of this is that
pad OD's are not much bigger than the corresponding ID's.  (Space
is at a premium in the enclosure.)  So drilling the pads open a
bit for eyelets or other wires is not going to be easy, or even
possible.

[ PCB was originally designed expecting to go to a proto-house
but I really want to get it done before leaving town tomorrow. ]

I've just tried a couple things, and the best answer is that of
leaving the components a bit higher off the board and getting in
there with a small pencil iron.  I do have some space behind the
board, so in some cases (depending on which side the signals
connect to) I'm going to mount the components on the back of the
board.  I have space on the back since I had already planned to
mount the TO-220 components on the back for easier heatsinking.

Since this board will be in a car, I'll probably have to pour on
some epoxy, hot-glue or similar to secure the components better.


Thanks,
-Neil.

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2002\12\15@232016 by Rick C.

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You probably saw it here:
http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~wwl/pcbs.html
Rick

"A.J. Tufgar" wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2002\12\15@232224 by PicDude

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A.J. Tufgar wrote:
>
> I remember reading a web page awhile back that some bought small metal
> tubes (don't think they were actually vias) and loaded them into a 0.5
> mm pencil, they pushed the pencil up against the board clicked it and
> the via would pop into the board, a little solder on each side and
> presto your done.  You could do something like this, but I have
> absolutly no idea what page I saw it on.  :)
>
> Hopefully this helps some, sorry I don't know where I found it,
>
> Aaron


I've also seen this, and sure it's bookmarked somewhere, but my bookmarks
have become like the web -- it's a pain searching thru it.  The product
was sort of an end-user thru-hole plating tool.

Cheers,
-Neil.

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2002\12\15@233846 by A.J. Tufgar

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Thanks Rick,
           I think that's where I saw it.  On his page he mentions
using long wavelength UV.  I was going to build a short wavelength box
to do PCB's and EPROM's, would you recommend against that for PCB's?

Thanks,
Aaron

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2002\12\15@235129 by Rick C.

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I don't really have a preference. I use an old UVS11E eprom eraser for
eproms and just the old No.2 photoflood for the boards. UV is faster and
doesn't generate any heat so there are advantages except for the cost.
Rick

"A.J. Tufgar" wrote:

> Thanks Rick,
>             I think that's where I saw it.  On his page he mentions
> using long wavelength UV.  I was going to build a short wavelength box
> to do PCB's and EPROM's, would you recommend against that for PCB's?
>
> Thanks,
> Aaron
>

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2002\12\16@003331 by Quentin

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I have used these pins for via's. I found them to big (although if
memory serves me correctly, my supplier were out of stock of smaller
ones). But they work. I know the name sounds like Harris or Harvard
(been a while). Try RS Electronics for it.
My problem with through hole plating (the lack there of) was with IC
pins, where you have a track on the top layer and need to solder on the
bottom. If I can find a solution for it (without changing my layout)
I'll happily start doing my own prototypes again.

Quentin
.....qscKILLspamspam@spam@iptech.co.za
http://www.iptech.co.za

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2002\12\16@010934 by Pang

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I have posted quite a number of enquiries to the list on this issue of
plated thru holes and up till now, still looking for an acceptable, cheaper
solution. The website for the Harvin vias mention the availability of
samples, but I got a quotation instead and no samples till now.
Actually,  the tool ( I have never used before ) that we are looking for is
available from Farnell, as mention by one of the listers. Check out the
details at Farnell, UK website.
Manufacturer Product Code  -  CSS001
Manufacturer    -    Multicore

remember to check the price too....


{Original Message removed}

2002\12\16@032251 by ISO-8859-1?Q?Ruben_J=F6nsson?=

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> Building a circuit that depends on the component-mounting
> pads to pass signals from bottom to top, like vias would.
> However, the holes are not plated thru.  My worry is that
> some of the components are flush-mounted to the board (like
> large caps) and some holes are tight enough that solder may
> not get thru to connect the sides.
>
> Is there something I can do to help fix this *before* I
> start mounting the components?  I'm going to pre-tin the
> holes on the component side, and the components close to
> the body, but not sure that will be a full solution.
>
> Cheers,
> -Neil.

What I usually do when it comes to large components like caps, relays, connectors etc. is to drill a second hole right next to the one for the component itself, in or at the edge of the pad. In this hole I press a rectangular shaped pin (from a suitable pcb header) and cut it flush against the PCB surface. I then solder it carefully on both sides, taking care not to get solder into the real hole and not to build it too high on the component side. Of course, this only works if the pad is big enough. I try to make sure that it is when the PCB is layed out (alternatively, just make a via next to the pad - if there is room for it, that is).

For smaller components, like decoupling caps which are connected to the top layer (usually ground plane for double sided PCB's) I just bend the pin and solder it directly to the top layer instead of putting it through the hole. Compared to raising the component a bit over the PCB and solder under the component on the top side, this ensures that there is as short extra lead length as possible between the trace (or ground plane) on the PCB and the component. This can be important since it is often a prototype that is used for EMC testing.

IC pins can often be soldered directly on the component side. This may require some care in deciding in what order the components have to be mounted - mount the ones that need most of component side soldering first, when the others are not in the way.

Ruben
==============================
Ruben Jönsson
AB Liros Electronic
Box 9124, 200 39 Malmö, Sweden
TEL INT +46 40142078
FAX INT +46 40947388
.....rubenKILLspamspam.....pp.sbbs.se
==============================

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2002\12\16@054441 by Mike Harrison

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On Sun, 15 Dec 2002 23:13:29 -0500, you wrote:

>I remember reading a web page awhile back that some bought small metal
>tubes (don't think they were actually vias) and loaded them into a 0.5
>mm pencil, they pushed the pencil up against the board clicked it and
>the via would pop into the board, a little solder on each side and
>presto your done.  You could do something like this, but I have
>absolutly no idea what page I saw it on.  :)
>
>Hopefully this helps some, sorry I don't know where I found it,
>
>Aaron
This was the copperset system, described on my site : http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~wwl/pcbs.html

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2002\12\16@054650 by Mike Harrison

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On Mon, 16 Dec 2002 07:30:22 +0200, you wrote:

>I have used these pins for via's. I found them to big (although if
>memory serves me correctly, my supplier were out of stock of smaller
>ones). But they work. I know the name sounds like Harris or Harvard
>(been a while). Try RS Electronics for it.
>My problem with through hole plating (the lack there of) was with IC
>pins, where you have a track on the top layer and need to solder on the
>bottom. If I can find a solution for it (without changing my layout)
>I'll happily start doing my own prototypes again.
ICs are no problem - use turned-pin sockets, which are relatively easy
to top-solder.

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2002\12\16@054856 by Mike Harrison

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It is expensive but you don't need the whole kit - just the bail bars.
You can use a 0.9mm automatic pencil to dispense them and a
ground-down centre punch to fit them.

Detailed info on this system at http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~wwl/pcbs.html
On Mon, 16 Dec 2002 14:01:17 +0800, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

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