Searching \ for '[EE]: PCB drill speeds' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/pcbs.htm?key=pcb
Search entire site for: 'PCB drill speeds'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE]: PCB drill speeds'
2005\08\05@082723 by Philip Pemberton

face picon face
Hi,
 Is anyone here using a Dremel (or similar tool) and tungsten-carbide bits
to drill PCBs? If so, what speed do you run the bits at?

Thanks.
--
Phil.                              | Acorn RiscPC600 SA220 64MB+6GB 100baseT
spam_OUTphilpemTakeThisOuTspamphilpem.me.uk              | Athlon64 3200+ A8VDeluxe R2 512MB+100GB
http://www.philpem.me.uk/          | Sony MZ-N710 NetMD Minidisc
... See that ZX81, That's your 486 DX 66 that is.

2005\08\05@090212 by Tarun Grover

picon face
Phil,

I use a Dremel type rotary tool, and usually run the spindle at a
setting between 4 and 6 (it has adjustments from off to 6(35000rpm)).
The PCB mill I have access to at University has a spindle speed of
20000rpm and does a fine job of drilling/cutting through PCBs.

-Tarun.

On 8/5/05, Philip Pemberton <.....philpemKILLspamspam@spam@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> Hi,
>   Is anyone here using a Dremel (or similar tool) and tungsten-carbide bits
> to drill PCBs? If so, what speed do you run the bits at?
>
> Thanks.
> --
> Phil.                              | Acorn RiscPC600 SA220 64MB+6GB 100baseT
> philpemspamKILLspamphilpem.me.uk              | Athlon64 3200+ A8VDeluxe R2 512MB+100GB
> http://www.philpem.me.uk/          | Sony MZ-N710 NetMD Minidisc
> ... See that ZX81, That's your 486 DX 66 that is.
> -

2005\08\05@091350 by John Remington

picon face
> On 8/5/05, Philip Pemberton <.....philpemKILLspamspam.....dsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> > Hi,
> >   Is anyone here using a Dremel (or similar tool) and tungsten-carbide bits
> > to drill PCBs? If so, what speed do you run the bits at?
> >
> > Thanks.
> > --
> > Phil.                              | Acorn RiscPC600 SA220 64MB+6GB 100baseT

I use a Dremel two speed unit.  High speed steel drill bit on the
35000 rpm setting.  Center punch the through-hole prior to drilling
(and prior to etching), keeps the drill from wandering around, works
great.

One like http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?&DID=7&Partnumber=360-652

I don't think you really need carbide unless you're doing thousands of holes.

2005\08\05@092507 by Jinx

face picon face
> I don't think you really need carbide unless you're doing
> thousands of holes.

Bearing in mind what you said, my experience is that carbide /
carbide-cobalt are good value. I used to use HSS a long time
ago but found you don't really get a lot of holes out of them. I
hate to think how many thousands of holes (not as a pro PCB
maker, but in a "I want a board and I want it now" capacity")
I've drilled over the years with just a couple of carbide bits

2005\08\05@095108 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 01:23 PM 8/5/2005 +0100, you wrote:
>Hi,
>   Is anyone here using a Dremel (or similar tool) and tungsten-carbide bits
>to drill PCBs? If so, what speed do you run the bits at?

Optimum drill speed is determined by the surface speed at the drill
cutting edges, typically measured in SFM in North America. If we assume
400 SFM for a carbide tool in FR4*, we have:

RPM ~= 4*SFM/diameter

If the maximum RPM your Dremel can do is 30K, then you can run it flat out
up to diameter

dia= 1600/30,000 = 53 thou

So, above about 0.05" tool diameter, you should start cutting back the
drill RPM proportionally.

Hope this helps.

Best regards,

* http://www.taconic-stl.com/fr4%20processing_guide.pdf


Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
EraseMEspeffspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com
->> Inexpensive test equipment & parts http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZspeff


2005\08\05@095830 by Philip Pemberton

face picon face
In message <89cc4e6005080506024f0ff998spamspam_OUTmail.gmail.com>>          Tarun Grover <@spam@tarun.groverKILLspamspamgmail.com> wrote:

> I use a Dremel type rotary tool, and usually run the spindle at a
> setting between 4 and 6 (it has adjustments from off to 6(35000rpm)).
> The PCB mill I have access to at University has a spindle speed of
> 20000rpm and does a fine job of drilling/cutting through PCBs.

That sounds about right - I've tried mine at 15,000RPM and 33,000RPM. At 33k
the drill bit produces rather oversized holes. At 15k it produces holes that
are about the right size.

I'm using a Dremel 285JB in a Wolfcraft drill stand (actually quite a good
stand, but it takes a bit of work to assemble). Seems to work fairly well;
certainly better than my last drill (an Expo Reliant - the chuck isn't
mounted on the motor shaft very well, so it's got a lot of runout - naff all
use for PCB drilling).

The bits are regrounds I bought from Jan-Erik Soderholm - some made by Tycom,
others by Kemmer-Präzision. Quite nice bits - certainly better than most,
even though they're regrounds that I've used to drill a good few hundred
holes.

Thanks.
-- Phil.                              | Acorn RiscPC600 SA220 64MB+6GB 100baseT
KILLspamphilpemKILLspamspamphilpem.me.uk              | Athlon64 3200+ A8VDeluxe R2 512MB+100GB
http://www.philpem.me.uk/          | Sony MZ-N710 NetMD Minidisc
... Contentsoftaglinemaysettleduringshipping

2005\08\05@112918 by Philip Pemberton

face picon face
In message <00e401c599c1$0ee0f990$0100a8c0@ivp2000>
         Jinx <RemoveMEjoecolquittTakeThisOuTspamclear.net.nz> wrote:

> Bearing in mind what you said, my experience is that carbide /
> carbide-cobalt are good value.

Until you break one. They're essential for glass fibre (FR4) laminates - HSS
bits tend to overheat and dull quite quickly. Carbides "just work" and
usually last for a few thousand holes.

> I used to use HSS a long time
> ago but found you don't really get a lot of holes out of them. I
> hate to think how many thousands of holes (not as a pro PCB
> maker, but in a "I want a board and I want it now" capacity")

The only real reason to keep a home PCB fab. "I want that board in two hours,
not two weeks!"

> I've drilled over the years with just a couple of carbide bits

I'm a clumsy oaf - I've broken about a dozen so far, partially thanks to
trying to use them at 2000RPM in a drill with naff bearings and a chuck that
was mounted at some odd angle to the motor shaft. The bits really don't seem
to like that... [sarcasm] I wonder why... [/sarcasm]

Given that I've just spent near enough £70 on a Dremel and a new drill stand,
I'd expect to break a few less bits... At £4.20 a throw, they're not exactly
cheap. Then again, I didn't pay £4.20 each for mine (see other message in
this thread) :)

Later.
-- Phil.                              | Acorn RiscPC600 SA220 64MB+6GB 100baseT
spamBeGonephilpemspamBeGonespamphilpem.me.uk              | Athlon64 3200+ A8VDeluxe R2 512MB+100GB
http://www.philpem.me.uk/          | Sony MZ-N710 NetMD Minidisc
... Hailing frequencies open Mr. Worf. - Hi, this is Steve Wright on 1 FM

2005\08\05@132801 by Dwayne Reid

flavicon
face
At 06:23 AM 8/5/2005, Philip Pemberton wrote:
>Hi,
>   Is anyone here using a Dremel (or similar tool) and tungsten-carbide bits
>to drill PCBs? If so, what speed do you run the bits at?

I've got a couple of different rigs here and all run the bits somewhere
between 30K to 60K RPM.

The oldest PCB drill I have is from "Metal Removal Corp" and looks like an
early Dremel tool with sleeve bushings.  I'm guessing it spins at 35K or so.

What's cool about that tool is that the run-out is just not measurable -
its so tiny.  I was told that was because of the sleeve bushings and
further experience seems to bear that out - any Dremel tool that I've
played with that came with sleeve bushings has always had less run-out than
those units with ball bearings.  I now grab any of the old sleeve bushing
Dremel tools I find at garage or yard sales - I don't think that Dremel
makes them anymore.

I also acquired some tiny inexpensive air-powered die-grinders that run at
about 60K.  I'm pretty sure they have ball bearings in them but the run-out
on the two or three I have here is so tiny as to be not a problem.

The last rig we use is a much modified engraving machine set up as a CNC
controlled PCB mill.  I'm pretty sure that it spins the bit at about 30K
RPM - and it should be faster when drilling PCB holes.  But its a fixed
speed motor that we just don't feel like messing with (no time to fix what
ain't broke) and the speed has to be slow enough so that the V-bit cutters
we use don't burn up.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <TakeThisOuTdwaynerEraseMEspamspam_OUTplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

Celebrating 21 years of Engineering Innovation (1984 - 2005)
 .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-
    `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'
Do NOT send unsolicited commercial email to this email address.
This message neither grants consent to receive unsolicited
commercial email nor is intended to solicit commercial email.

2005\08\05@180334 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
>> Bearing in mind what you said, my experience is that carbide /
>> carbide-cobalt are good value.

Especially with the PCB industry throwing them away after perhaps half
of their nominal life, so that "used" carbide drills are widely
available
from surplus dealers at a fraction of their original price.

BillW

2005\08\05@184203 by Jinx

face picon face
> Especially with the PCB industry throwing them away after perhaps
> half of their nominal life, so that "used" carbide drills are widely
> available from surplus dealers at a fraction of their original price.

Too true. I'd recommend anyone doing PCB fab at home to pay a
visit to a board house (maybe "I do this at home and wondered how
the pros do it" to get in the door) and see what's going spare. Well,
bits and offcuts, free if you ask nicely, are about it actually. A pity I
fell out with the knob-end who runs my local, but at least I had a
good old rummage through his offcuts bin first

2005\08\05@184210 by Jinx

face picon face
> Given that I've just spent near enough £70 on a Dremel and a
> new drill stand, I'd expect to break a few less bits...

I've never got the hang of using a drill stand for PCBs and have
always done it free-hand. Perhaps why I seldom break a bit ?

2005\08\05@191237 by PicDude

flavicon
face
I've had excellent results with Harbor Freight drill bits -- US$5 (or $3 when
on sale) for 20 assorted carbide bits in a case.  Check item #'s 44924 and
34640 at http://www.harborfreight.com .  More than half are useful sizes for PC
boards.

BTW, what does the term "knob-end" mean?  Should I guess it to be a derogatory
term?

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Friday 05 August 2005 05:39 pm, Jinx scribbled:
{Quote hidden}

2005\08\05@191716 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 03:03 PM 8/5/2005 -0700, you wrote:
>>>Bearing in mind what you said, my experience is that carbide /
>>>carbide-cobalt are good value.
>
>Especially with the PCB industry throwing them away after perhaps half
>of their nominal life, so that "used" carbide drills are widely available
>from surplus dealers at a fraction of their original price.
>
>BillW

I got a pack of 50 resharpened carbide bits of various sizes (with color-
coded plastic collars and 1/8" shafts) for really cheap (can't remember the
exact price, but it was an impulse purchase) from Lee Valley. They are
USD$18.95/CAD25.95 now (item 92W02.22). There are more really tiny
ones (for vias) than most DIY PCB makers will want, but at the price of
just a few new ones, you can't go far wrong.

>Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
RemoveMEspeffspamTakeThisOuTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com
->> Inexpensive test equipment & parts http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZspeff


2005\08\05@193420 by Jinx

face picon face
> BTW, what does the term "knob-end" mean?  Should I guess it
> to be a derogatory term?

Ding !! Neil moves on to the next round ;-)

2005\08\08@045721 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>> BTW, what does the term "knob-end" mean?  Should I guess it
>> to be a derogatory term?
>
>Ding !! Neil moves on to the next round ;-)

Related to the head honcho being similar in brains to a certain part of male
anatomy ... ;))

2005\08\08@055355 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
On Sat, 06 Aug 2005 11:34:14 +1200, Jinx wrote:

> > BTW, what does the term "knob-end" mean?  Should I guess it
> > to be a derogatory term?
>
> Ding !! Neil moves on to the next round ;-)

Unless he calls someone that, in which case he'll have been knocked out in this one!  :-)

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2005 , 2006 only
- Today
- New search...