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'[EE]: Opinions spought on Electrostatic dissipatio'
2001\01\12@071513 by Roman Black

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Russell McMahon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Russell, this is VERY unscientific, but it works!
We use polypropyline plastic tubs, the cheap clear
ones they use for take away food. We buy them in
boxes of 500 with lids. They stack well, and you
can see inside.

We had many shelves in all 3 shops stacked high
with these with 20 years of saved components, used
and new. In TV industry you save chips, some you
can never source again. Now we have one main shop
and many of the parts are in my home workshop, wall
to wall. I am probably the only guy here with
10,000+ assorted transistors in my home.

Never ever had a problem, and we have apprentices
constantly rummaging in the tubs and pouring
parts in and out. And they get transported in cars,
rubbing on carpet and seats. :o)
-Roman

PS. I priced "nice" drawers and stuff, we were
up for thousands of dollars to duplicate the
setup we have now in "proper" drawers. Obviously
we left it how it is.

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2001\01\12@125501 by Lawrence Lile

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The old Polypropylene plastic tub method is begging for trouble.  Not
immediate trouble, you can install a zapped chip and it might work fine for
a while.  But it's LIFE is often shortened. Many zapped components will work
fine for a time or two, maybe even a month!.

However, for a TV repair shop, that might be just the thing you need!  More
customers!

I first experienced this when I was wearing a sweater, in the winter (Dry),
on a wooden bench.  I'd put a PIC in a circuit, it would work fine for a few
minutes, then die.  I'd scratch my head, replace it, unknowingly  rubbing my
arms in my sweater for another lightning bolt charge, and the new PIC would
work fine.  Twenty minutes later, the same failure mode.  I burnt up five in
a row before a carpet shock reminded me  "OH - DUH - Static!"

If your TV shop is in New Orleans, where it is always humid, or Hong Kong,
Viet Nam, or anywhere else where it is always foggy, you'll probably never
have a failure due to static.

-- Lawrence Lile


> Russell, this is VERY unscientific, but it works!
> We use polypropyline plastic tubs, the cheap clear
> ones they use for take away food. We buy them in
> boxes of 500 with lids. They stack well, and you
> can see inside.
>

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2001\01\25@012334 by Dan Michaels

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>Russell McMahon wrote:
>>
>> I'd be interested in opinions (backed by any available hard data) on what
>> constitutes an adequate dissipative surface for a storage container used for
>> electronic components.
>>
>> I have a number of plastic containers which I wish to use for component
>> storage.
>> I have lightly sprayed the interior of a number of these with a thin layer
>> of Nickel spray (intended for EMI/EMC shielding purposes.
>> While this produces an adequately conductive container, the spray is
>> horrendously expensive for this purpose and not always readily available.
>>
>> As a possible alternative I have a rub-on paint like which is intended to
>> produce a metallic "copper" finish for decorative purposes.
>>
>> The resultant finish produces a resistance of around 200 megohms (!!!)


Russell,

Answer here a little late in coming. Someone mentioned aluminum foil.

For something cheap, effective, durable, low-R, and easy to use,
try aluminum-foil duct tape. Basically, aluminum foil with stickum
on the back. Resistance is essentially non-existent, so ESD
dissipation is more than adequate. Easy to cut, not a mess like
paint or normal foil. When you put your hand in the storage bin,
you'll discharge nicely.

For hard evidence, I can attest that this tape is extremely good
at shielding EMI. Before I started using EMI-shielded ABS boxes
on one of my projects, I shielded a few normal boxes with the
stick-um foil. It worked great at keeping digital noise out
of the analog area a couple of inches away. I just applied the
foil to the inner surface of the ABS case with a strip going
over and catching a gnd lug. Also, used it for quick-build
gnd planes in a few situations.

This should be more "hard data" than you need for your storage
bins, unless protecting against possible EMP.

hope this helps,
- Dan Michaels
Oricom Technologies
http://www.oricomtech.com
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2001\01\25@044026 by Alan B. Pearce

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>For something cheap, effective, durable, low-R, and easy to use,
>try aluminum-foil duct tape. Basically, aluminum foil with stickum
>on the back. Resistance is essentially non-existent, so ESD

And the 3M stuff I have seen in the UK is made in NZ according to the inside of
the roll. Go get it Russell, it comes from just down the road!

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