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'[EE]: Measuring Current'
2002\02\18@140812 by Donovan Parks

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Hello,

Will placing an ammeter in series along the positive end of my power supply
tell me how much current my circuit requires?  Seems like it should, but my
thumbs are green when it comes to actually doing EE.  Thanks for taking the
time to enlighten me.

+5V ---> Ammeter ----> +5V terminal of circuit

Regards,
Donovan

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2002\02\18@141659 by Jim

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Yes.

Connect an Ammeter *in series* for current

and a Voltmeter *in parallel* for Voltage.

Jim


{Original Message removed}

2002\02\18@141702 by Dale Botkin

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On Mon, 18 Feb 2002, Donovan Parks wrote:

> +5V ---> Ammeter ----> +5V terminal of circuit

That's the way, yes.

Dale

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2002\02\18@150051 by Michael Vinson

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Donovan Parks wrote:
>Will placing an ammeter in series along the positive end of my power supply
>tell me how much current my circuit requires?  Seems like it should, but my
>thumbs are green when it comes to actually doing EE.  Thanks for taking the
>time to enlighten me.
>
>+5V ---> Ammeter ----> +5V terminal of circuit

Yes, unless your application is supplied from several different
voltage sources (e.g. 5V and 12V). In that case, you can connect
the ammeter between circuit ground and the (common) power supply
ground. That will allow you to measure TOTAL current drain.

Michael V

Thank you for reading my little posting.


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2002\02\18@150433 by Dal Wheeler
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Just make sure you have the meter set on the amperage setting and in the
expected range before you power up the circuit...  You could pop a fuse in
the meter if you aren't careful.  I seem to manage to do this every other
month or so...

----- Original Message -----
From: Dale Botkin <spam_OUTdaleTakeThisOuTspamBOTKIN.ORG>

>
> > +5V ---> Ammeter ----> +5V terminal of circuit
>
> That's the way, yes.
>
> Dale

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2002\02\18@152838 by Thomas C. Sefranek

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Michael Vinson wrote:

> Donovan Parks wrote:
>
>> Will placing an ammeter in series along the positive end of my power
>> supply
>> tell me how much current my circuit requires?  Seems like it should,
>> but my
>> thumbs are green when it comes to actually doing EE.  Thanks for
>> taking the
>> time to enlighten me.
>>
>> +5V ---> Ammeter ----> +5V terminal of circuit
>
>
> Yes, unless your application is supplied from several different
> voltage sources (e.g. 5V and 12V).

OF THE SAME POLARITY!!!

{Quote hidden}

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2002\02\18@153845 by Jim

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael Vinson" <mjvinsonspamKILLspamHOTMAIL.COM>
To: <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Monday, February 18, 2002 1:59 PM
Subject: Re: [EE]: Measuring Current


> Donovan Parks wrote:
> >Will placing an ammeter in series along the positive end of my power
supply
> >tell me how much current my circuit requires?  Seems like it should, but
my
> >thumbs are green when it comes to actually doing EE.  Thanks for taking
the
{Quote hidden}

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2002\02\18@154750 by Olin Lathrop

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> Will placing an ammeter in series along the positive end of my power
supply
> tell me how much current my circuit requires?  Seems like it should, but
my
> thumbs are green when it comes to actually doing EE.  Thanks for taking
the
> time to enlighten me.
>
> +5V ---> Ammeter ----> +5V terminal of circuit

That should work fine most of the time.


********************************************************************
Olin Lathrop, embedded systems consultant in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, EraseMEolinspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTembedinc.com, http://www.embedinc.com

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2002\02\19@054747 by Vasile Surducan

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On Mon, 18 Feb 2002, Jim wrote:

> Yes.
>
> Connect an Ammeter *in series* for current
>
> and a Voltmeter *in parallel* for Voltage.
>

 connect an ohmmeter in parallel with your mains socket to measure the
 internal mains resistence....

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